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C. S. Lewis's dazzling allegory about Heaven and Hell—and the chasm fixed between them—is one of his most brilliantly imaginative tales, where we discover that the gates of Hell are locked from the inside.

In a dream, the narrator boards a bus on a drizzly afternoon in Hell and embarks on an incredible voyage to Heaven. Anyone in Hell is invited on board, and anyone may remain in Heaven if he or she so chooses. But do we really want to live in Heaven? This powerful, exquisitely written fantasy is one of C. S. Lewis's most enduring works of fiction and a profound meditation on good and evil and on what God really offers us.

Topics: Philosophical, British Author, The Afterlife, Hell, Heaven, Christian Afterlife, Allegory, Inklings, First Person Narration, Inspirational, Morality, Angels, Christianity, Journeys, Speculative Fiction, Contemplative, Novella, and Catholicism

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061947353
List price: $9.99
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Here are some quotes I took away from this read: "Thirst was made for water; inquiry for truth. What you now call the free play of inquiry has neither more nor less to do with the ends for which intelligence was given you than masturbation has to do with marriage""Heaven is reality itself. All that is fully real is Heavenly. For all that can be shaken will be shaken and only the unshakeable remains." "There is but one good; that is God. Everything else is good when it looks to Him and bad when it turns from Him." This is a thought-provoking read, easily done in the span of an afternoon. As stated in the preface, it is to be read as a fantasy, but it of course has an intentional moral. One of the biggest things I took from this novel is the natural error we often make of confusing means and ends. We do this with many activities/hobbies: we collect albums, but forget to listen to them; we do homework quickly and negate learning; we study the Bible and forget to love the Word as the living breath of God. I do this quite often. My heart is prone to switch from delighting in God to delighting in the methods that I use bring me this pleasuring in Him. This is idolatry. It is a sinful snare that takes people away from what makes them truly happy. True happiness is only ever achieved when God is the end.more
I tried to get into this literary classic and just couldn't quite understand it. It came highly recommended to me by a friend of mine because he knew I had just read and enjoyed Rob Bell's, "Love Wins". Apparently Lewis and Bell think similarly on issues relating to Heaven, Hell, and the afterlife. But, there was just too much use of allegory and symbolism in "The Great Divorce" that I couldn't bring myself to finish it simply for a lack of understanding on my part. If I can't understand a book then I don't see the sense in continuing to read it. And, so I reluctantly stopped reading this one about halfway through. If you have no problem understanding allegory, then I recommend this book. But, if you are like me and find it difficult to understand allegory, then save yourself the time and read Love Wins instead.more
An interesting book, even though there are many things I don’t agree with in it. It’s overly preachy, full of straw man arguments, and generally full of the idea that you should never question or stray from strict Christian dogma or you are a damned fool. Other than that it has some good, thought provoking ideas that you can take in ways the author may not have intended. It is very short, and that’s a good thing, I wouldn’t have wanted too much of it.more
Lewis' story of a bus trip from hell to heaven is one of Lewis' most quotable books, and contains a number of fascinating insights into human nature. The book is perhaps best summed up in the quote, "There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, “Thy will be done,” and those to whom God says, in the end, “Thy will be done.” All that are in Hell, choose it." It is one of those books you can easily read from cover to cover in one night.more
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Reviews

Here are some quotes I took away from this read: "Thirst was made for water; inquiry for truth. What you now call the free play of inquiry has neither more nor less to do with the ends for which intelligence was given you than masturbation has to do with marriage""Heaven is reality itself. All that is fully real is Heavenly. For all that can be shaken will be shaken and only the unshakeable remains." "There is but one good; that is God. Everything else is good when it looks to Him and bad when it turns from Him." This is a thought-provoking read, easily done in the span of an afternoon. As stated in the preface, it is to be read as a fantasy, but it of course has an intentional moral. One of the biggest things I took from this novel is the natural error we often make of confusing means and ends. We do this with many activities/hobbies: we collect albums, but forget to listen to them; we do homework quickly and negate learning; we study the Bible and forget to love the Word as the living breath of God. I do this quite often. My heart is prone to switch from delighting in God to delighting in the methods that I use bring me this pleasuring in Him. This is idolatry. It is a sinful snare that takes people away from what makes them truly happy. True happiness is only ever achieved when God is the end.more
I tried to get into this literary classic and just couldn't quite understand it. It came highly recommended to me by a friend of mine because he knew I had just read and enjoyed Rob Bell's, "Love Wins". Apparently Lewis and Bell think similarly on issues relating to Heaven, Hell, and the afterlife. But, there was just too much use of allegory and symbolism in "The Great Divorce" that I couldn't bring myself to finish it simply for a lack of understanding on my part. If I can't understand a book then I don't see the sense in continuing to read it. And, so I reluctantly stopped reading this one about halfway through. If you have no problem understanding allegory, then I recommend this book. But, if you are like me and find it difficult to understand allegory, then save yourself the time and read Love Wins instead.more
An interesting book, even though there are many things I don’t agree with in it. It’s overly preachy, full of straw man arguments, and generally full of the idea that you should never question or stray from strict Christian dogma or you are a damned fool. Other than that it has some good, thought provoking ideas that you can take in ways the author may not have intended. It is very short, and that’s a good thing, I wouldn’t have wanted too much of it.more
Lewis' story of a bus trip from hell to heaven is one of Lewis' most quotable books, and contains a number of fascinating insights into human nature. The book is perhaps best summed up in the quote, "There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, “Thy will be done,” and those to whom God says, in the end, “Thy will be done.” All that are in Hell, choose it." It is one of those books you can easily read from cover to cover in one night.more
This classic Lewis book was fascinating, interesting, and moving.more
A fable about what it means to get to heaven. Done very well with the imagery of a "solid" heaven. Lewis did a good job of describing Hell not as a demon-filled inferno; rather as a dreary town where no one gets along and no one is happy. Kind of reminded me of the novel "Hell". Especially meaningful were the scenes where the phantoms would not shed their earthly vanities for the chance of heaven. I also liked Lewis' interaction with George MacDonald - his self-proclaimed inspiration. Jack never disappoints.more
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