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The Great Divorce

The Great Divorce

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Ratings:
Rating: 4 out of 5 stars4/5 (1,010 ratings)
Length: 120 pages2 hours

Description

The narrator finds himself in a bland, hopeless town during nightfall. The town appears to be completely empty except for a line of beings waiting at a bus stop. With nothing else to do, the narrator joins them. While waiting, he watches a man and woman fight over whether to get on the bus, and eventually leave the line. Another man complains about other people in line, and is eventually forced out. Two people trick a young woman out of her place in line, and once she is out no one will let her back in. Eventually the bus arrives, and everyone in line boards. The narrator begins to chat with many of the passengers, trying to learn their story and how they came to where they are…

The Great Divorce represents C.S. Lewis’s vision of the Afterworld, telling the story of the narrator on a bus during a drizzly English afternoon. He soon finds himself on an incredible journey through Heaven and Hell, meeting a host of supernatural beings along the way, many of which are completely different than his expectations. After much journeying, the narrator eventually comes to significant realizations about the nature of good and evil, about Heaven, Hell, and even Purgatory.
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The Great Divorce

Book Actions

Start Reading

Book Information

The Great Divorce

Ratings:
Rating: 4 out of 5 stars4/5 (1,010 ratings)
Length: 120 pages2 hours

Description

The narrator finds himself in a bland, hopeless town during nightfall. The town appears to be completely empty except for a line of beings waiting at a bus stop. With nothing else to do, the narrator joins them. While waiting, he watches a man and woman fight over whether to get on the bus, and eventually leave the line. Another man complains about other people in line, and is eventually forced out. Two people trick a young woman out of her place in line, and once she is out no one will let her back in. Eventually the bus arrives, and everyone in line boards. The narrator begins to chat with many of the passengers, trying to learn their story and how they came to where they are…

The Great Divorce represents C.S. Lewis’s vision of the Afterworld, telling the story of the narrator on a bus during a drizzly English afternoon. He soon finds himself on an incredible journey through Heaven and Hell, meeting a host of supernatural beings along the way, many of which are completely different than his expectations. After much journeying, the narrator eventually comes to significant realizations about the nature of good and evil, about Heaven, Hell, and even Purgatory.
Read More