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Wouldn't you love to abolish the IRS ...
Keep all the money in your paycheck ...
Pay taxes on what you spend, not what you earn ...
And eliminate all the fraud, hassle, and waste of our current system?

Then the FairTax is for you. In the face of the outlandish American tax burden, talk-radio firebrand Neal Boortz and Congressman John Linder are leading the charge to phase out our current, unfair system and enact the FairTax Plan, replacing the federal income tax and withholding system with a simple 23 percent retail sales tax on new goods and services. This dramatic revision of the current system, which would eliminate the reviled IRS, has already caught fire in the American heartland, with more than six hundred thousand taxpayers signing on in support of the plan.

As Boortz and Linder reveal in this first book on the FairTax, this radical but eminently sensible plan would end the annual national nightmare of filing income tax returns, while at the same time enlarging the federal tax base by collecting sales tax from every retail consumer in the country. The FairTax, they argue, would transform the fearsome bureaucracy of the IRS into a more transparent, accountable, and equitable tax collection system. Among other benefits, it will:

  • Make America's tax code truly voluntary, without reducing revenue
  • Replace today's indecipherable tax code with one simple sales tax
  • Protect lower-income Americans by covering the tax on basic necessities
  • Eliminate billions of dollars in embedded taxes we don't even know we're paying
  • Bring offshore corporate dollars back into the U.S. economy

Endorsed by scores of leading economists and supported by a huge and growing grassroots movement, the FairTax Plan could revolutionize the way America pays for itself. In this straight-talking book, Neal Boortz and John Linder show you how it would work—and how you can help make it happen.

Published: HarperCollins on Mar 17, 2009
ISBN: 9780061742644
List price: $8.99
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Awesome, go read if you have interest in anything. Vote for it, write your senator, congressman/woman, rally for it, whatev.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a pretty interesting read. It gets rather redundant towards the end, it almost feels like the author is trying to pound their message into you.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I will begin by stating I had never heard of Neal Boortz until about two years ago when his syndicated show came to our local market; with that I still have never listened to one full hour. We definitely share political ideologies, but I wouldn't consider myself a sycophant. I picked this book up for $2 and wanted to inform myself on different tax plans floating around after becoming intrigued by Herman Cain's 999 plan.This is a book review however, and not a radio personality piece. I found the FairTax idea an interesting one and worth investigating. The book itself provided a well written history of the income tax, withholding (a subversive method of siphoning our money for political fodder), and the evolution of Medicare and Social Security. I would liked to have read a book dedicated just to these topics alone. The two authors lay out a very compelling argument for their desired tax plan. It is a consumption tax, rather than an "off the top" involuntary tribute to the government. Say what you will about some intricacies, the overall idea is very fair - there is no built in class warfare or pitting groups against each other. This exposes opponents, who regularly talk about fairness in the tax system, as having no desire for fairness, but only of punishment and redistribution. The equitable goal of the FairTax is that everyone (working poor, black marketeer, family of four, uber-rich yachtsman and politician) would pay, at the time of the book's writing, 23% "sales" tax on any good purchased. This is appreciably more reasonable than the convoluted system of taxation which burdens us now. The FairTax would do away with our current regulations, which are often contradictory and far too confusing for even an attorney or tax agent to completely understand. As the authors mention a few times, those who administer black market and illegal trades that deal in cash, the estimated 1-plus trillion dollars lost in the underworld markets would be captured through consumption of legal goods; most importantly, the activity would not be legalized.My dislike for the FairTax is the idea of a "prebate." The book explains it as a monthly check to sent to every household to prophylactically rebate purchase of items deemed essential. For instance in my state, items deemed necessary (non-prepared food, medicine and clothing) are not subject to a sale's tax. The prebate would be issued on something similar to a debit card. While it isn't the idea of not applying a sales tax to food and medicine, it is the fact that the government still determines what is and isn't taxed, doling out money (a reasonable assumption the monthly total would be set by the legislature), and continues the Social Security-style monthly check. While this plan is a great step to limiting the size of government, the idea of a prebate group to replace the Internal Revenue Service seems like a zero-sum game. What is encouraging would be the repatriation of off-shored money residing in tax sheltered accounts; the disappearance of the approximately 23% "built in" tax each layer of regulation and corporate taxes add to the final cost of a good or service; and no withholding of our paychecks.Take it as you will, it is from a radio talk host and a congressman, but as the opposition always demands an alternative to the "no" of Republicans, here is one of many tax proposals.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Interesting idea. Would it work? Boortz comes over as a wingnut, which doesn't help his credibility. A well-reasoned, tone-neutral approach would, I think, be more likely to sway the public. Righteous indignation never won me over.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Fair Tax Book covers the advantages and the process of instituting a national fair sales tax. For an introductory reader on the subject, the book will really help you gain insight into why we need a fair sales tax (or why we don’t need the current system of taxing that we have). I love the concept of a national sales tax instead of income taxes, corporate taxes, property taxes, etc.The reason why I only gave this book a 3-star rating (instead of a 5) was because I felt that it was a little redundant towards the end, and there were a few problems with some of the arguments. For the most part, I think that the authors did an excellent job, but I don’t feel like they needed to exagerrate the facts or continually repeat key points in order to win people over. Overall, I would recommend this book as a resourceful read for those interested in learning a little more about our tax code and the problems with it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Here is a tax policy that is thoroughly researched, treats everyone fairly, would encourage savings and investment, and gets rid of the IRS! What more could you ask for...Here you have a tax proposal that not only simplifies the tax code, but could actually make the USA the number location for manufacturing. Gets rid of all payroll, income taxes, and inheritance, and replaces with a simple national sales tax. This proposal would also completely untax the poor by providing a prebate on all taxes for spending up to the poverty level of each household.I highly recommend it this book!!!!!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is a great read, and a must for anyone who wants to be informed about how our current tax code is corrupt, and how we can fix it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
simple solutions to complex problems? i recall when i finished reading it that it wasnt regressive, but now i cant remember :(radical changeread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Awesome, go read if you have interest in anything. Vote for it, write your senator, congressman/woman, rally for it, whatev.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a pretty interesting read. It gets rather redundant towards the end, it almost feels like the author is trying to pound their message into you.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I will begin by stating I had never heard of Neal Boortz until about two years ago when his syndicated show came to our local market; with that I still have never listened to one full hour. We definitely share political ideologies, but I wouldn't consider myself a sycophant. I picked this book up for $2 and wanted to inform myself on different tax plans floating around after becoming intrigued by Herman Cain's 999 plan.This is a book review however, and not a radio personality piece. I found the FairTax idea an interesting one and worth investigating. The book itself provided a well written history of the income tax, withholding (a subversive method of siphoning our money for political fodder), and the evolution of Medicare and Social Security. I would liked to have read a book dedicated just to these topics alone. The two authors lay out a very compelling argument for their desired tax plan. It is a consumption tax, rather than an "off the top" involuntary tribute to the government. Say what you will about some intricacies, the overall idea is very fair - there is no built in class warfare or pitting groups against each other. This exposes opponents, who regularly talk about fairness in the tax system, as having no desire for fairness, but only of punishment and redistribution. The equitable goal of the FairTax is that everyone (working poor, black marketeer, family of four, uber-rich yachtsman and politician) would pay, at the time of the book's writing, 23% "sales" tax on any good purchased. This is appreciably more reasonable than the convoluted system of taxation which burdens us now. The FairTax would do away with our current regulations, which are often contradictory and far too confusing for even an attorney or tax agent to completely understand. As the authors mention a few times, those who administer black market and illegal trades that deal in cash, the estimated 1-plus trillion dollars lost in the underworld markets would be captured through consumption of legal goods; most importantly, the activity would not be legalized.My dislike for the FairTax is the idea of a "prebate." The book explains it as a monthly check to sent to every household to prophylactically rebate purchase of items deemed essential. For instance in my state, items deemed necessary (non-prepared food, medicine and clothing) are not subject to a sale's tax. The prebate would be issued on something similar to a debit card. While it isn't the idea of not applying a sales tax to food and medicine, it is the fact that the government still determines what is and isn't taxed, doling out money (a reasonable assumption the monthly total would be set by the legislature), and continues the Social Security-style monthly check. While this plan is a great step to limiting the size of government, the idea of a prebate group to replace the Internal Revenue Service seems like a zero-sum game. What is encouraging would be the repatriation of off-shored money residing in tax sheltered accounts; the disappearance of the approximately 23% "built in" tax each layer of regulation and corporate taxes add to the final cost of a good or service; and no withholding of our paychecks.Take it as you will, it is from a radio talk host and a congressman, but as the opposition always demands an alternative to the "no" of Republicans, here is one of many tax proposals.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Interesting idea. Would it work? Boortz comes over as a wingnut, which doesn't help his credibility. A well-reasoned, tone-neutral approach would, I think, be more likely to sway the public. Righteous indignation never won me over.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Fair Tax Book covers the advantages and the process of instituting a national fair sales tax. For an introductory reader on the subject, the book will really help you gain insight into why we need a fair sales tax (or why we don’t need the current system of taxing that we have). I love the concept of a national sales tax instead of income taxes, corporate taxes, property taxes, etc.The reason why I only gave this book a 3-star rating (instead of a 5) was because I felt that it was a little redundant towards the end, and there were a few problems with some of the arguments. For the most part, I think that the authors did an excellent job, but I don’t feel like they needed to exagerrate the facts or continually repeat key points in order to win people over. Overall, I would recommend this book as a resourceful read for those interested in learning a little more about our tax code and the problems with it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Here is a tax policy that is thoroughly researched, treats everyone fairly, would encourage savings and investment, and gets rid of the IRS! What more could you ask for...Here you have a tax proposal that not only simplifies the tax code, but could actually make the USA the number location for manufacturing. Gets rid of all payroll, income taxes, and inheritance, and replaces with a simple national sales tax. This proposal would also completely untax the poor by providing a prebate on all taxes for spending up to the poverty level of each household.I highly recommend it this book!!!!!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is a great read, and a must for anyone who wants to be informed about how our current tax code is corrupt, and how we can fix it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
simple solutions to complex problems? i recall when i finished reading it that it wasnt regressive, but now i cant remember :(radical change
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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