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Editor’s Note

“Dazzling Poetic Prose...”

This beautifully offbeat novel deftly entwines a magical Los Angeles (aptly called Shangri-L.A.) with all-too-real issues of adulthood in the ‘80s. Its poetic prose is sure to dazzle teen and adult readers alike.
Alex P.
Scribd Editor

Fifteen years ago Francesca Lia Block made a dazzling entrance into the literary scene with what would become one of the most talked-about books of the decade: Weetzie Bat. This poetic roller coaster swoop has a sleek new design to match its new sister and brother books, Goat Girls and Beautiful Boys. Rediscover the magic of Weetzie Bat, Ms. Blocks sophisticated, slinkster-cool love song to L.A.the book that shattered the standard, captivated readers of all generations, and made Francesca Lia Block one of the most heralded authors of the last decade.

Topics: California, Friendship, LGBTQ, Family, Magic, Sexuality, Los Angeles, Love, Magical Realism, Minimalism, Series, Lyrical, Whimsical, Babies, HIV/AIDS, Urban, Poetic, 1980s, 1990s, and Novella

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 6, 2009
ISBN: 9780061971792
List price: $5.99
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A beautiful fairy-tale vision of L.A. life in the 80's. read more
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strange and beautiful; a surreal love letter to Los Angeles from the heart of a unique soul..this was one of my very favorite books as an alienated teenager, and still is, 20 years later... a very unique voyage into a very interesting world that isn't entirely fictional. Recommended for all you weirdos not unlike myself, who are looking for something different and written with heart and flourish. read more
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The author addresses serious social issues in the ups and downs of Weetzie's life without the doom and preachiness of some other coming-of-age books, often leaving implications unsaid for the readers to judge for themselves. The narrative is filled with vivid imagery from the author's whimsical similes and colorful descriptions of favorite local haunts, good eats, and amateur filmmaking experiences in their free-spirited L.A. lifestyle. Nonetheless, except for the whimsical similes and vivid imagery, I didn't like it. The author seemed to be trying too hard to pack in too many taboo issues and break every convention so as to draw attention to the work. If the title Clueless hadn't been already taken by a film, I'd have suggested that as an alternate title. Instead, we're stuck with one of the most irritating names ever.Oh, and the only magical realism in it is really a couple of ridiculous plot devices including a genie that just shows up conveniently but out of the blue (and never to be seen or mentioned again) in order to make the story possible.read more
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the style is very fast paced, but really has a good undertone. also just fun to read, kinda out there.read more
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Weetzie Bat is a strange, thin little book about a teenager living in Los Angeles. Over the course of the story, she goes from having a broken home to creating a family of her own, consisting of a gay couple, her My Secret Agent Lover Man (that's her boyfriend's actual name), her baby, her boyfriend's witch baby, and numerous dogs. It has elements of the fantastical, and at times feels like a queer love letter to L.A. in all its flashy impermanence.I didn't enjoy this book. I found it shallow, and I never cared about any of the characters. That being said, I don't think I was the intended audience. Weetzie Bat would be a PERFECT book for high schooler who is below reading level. The writing is simplistic, but deals with teenage-level topics. The main character has a threesome with her two gay, male best friends, even though it is not written about in inappropriate detail. It's a perfect gateway book to more advanced readingread more
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This was required reading for me, and I often enjoy whimsical writing and fairy tales, but this one didn't do much for me. There's very little detail about what the characters are thinking or who they are outside the context of their role in the story. Weetzie hangs out with Dirk avoiding the lame high school kids who don't understand them, and when she finds a genie in a bottle she wishes for a boyfriend for herself, one for Dirk, and a place to live. She gets all three, but when her boyfriend doesn't want to have a baby with her, she resorts to some unusual means to get one. I also thought that Weetzie didn't reflect on or learn from any of the things that happened to her or the choices she made. The characters go through very little, if any, character development, and when they make questionable decisions or life throws hurdles at them, a magic solution appears out of this air or the problem goes away. No one has to do or learn anything. Would Weetzie make the same manipulative choices if she and her boyfriend disagreed on something other than child rearing? Nothing tells me she wouldn't. I usually like stories that have a fairy-tale quality, magical realism and themes of love and a makeshift family, but this one was not for me. The message of this book, love your friends and everything will turn out exactly how you want, seems guaranteed to disappoint.read more
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Plug into the love current. A great YA read!read more
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4Q, 4PI appreciated Weetzie Bat for the simplicity of the writing, yet complexity of the subjects. In such a short amount of time, Francesca Lia Block wove a story of friendship, loss, love, longing and trust. Entire books are written on complexities of same sex relationships, broken marriages, alcohol and drugs, broken trust, unfaithful behavior, death, desire, parenthood and fear of the unknown. By writing such short, but powerful anecdotes of these weighty topics, the reader gains enough context and insight to understand the overall message. While the first few pages of the story led me to believe this was going to be about bored kids looking for trouble, I learned at the end of chapter one, the story was truly about respectful, loving relationships. Weetsie is an honest, accepting, caring, person who sets the bar high for all of us.read more
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This was an odd read for me. It was so incredibly surreal, it was almost dreamlike. This only added to the book's charm though. Very real issues were lying under the surface (AIDS, divorce, homosexuality, etc.), and a lot of them didn't even stand out to me until after I had finished the book. I thought about this book for days after finishing it.read more
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I'm not sure why I liked this story so much, but it may be because there is a magical fairy-tale quality to it.read more
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Now begins a phase of young adult literature and I cannot think of a better introduction than the poetic, musical eclectic modern day fairly tale by Francesca Lia Block. It was truly a joy to read!YA566-5Q, YA566-5Pread more
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I gave this book a 3Q rating because the writing was interesting but not incredible. I gave it a popularity rating of 3P because I feel that some teens will really enjoy it, but that it is a very distinctive style that may not have broad appeal. Personally I thought that the book was unique. I liked the fantasy and punk feel of it. I also liked the character of Weetzie. The serious issues woven into the fantasy kept this book interesting. I missed having character development. Everyone but Weetzie, and even her at times, felt like cardboard cuttouts. I didn't feel a connection with any of them, which took away from my enjoyment of the story.read more
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I picked up this book at a library book sale. I thought it sounded interesting and I had heard good things about it. I even liked the size of this little book that I could manage to carry everywhere with me. I will say that the characters are definitely quirky. But ya' know, I really really liked them. I read this in two days. The characters are this funky hodge-podge of people who wind up together and grow to love one another. Each character is distinctly different. The imagery is amazing, little interesting jewels tucked in here and there. There is some sex in the book. Despite it's funkiness or because of it, I'm giving this one 3 1/2 big ol' kissesread more
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I have to say, I did not care for this book at all. It lacked character and plot development and was way over simplistic for my taste. This is probably what the author was going for, as I can't figure out any other reason for it, but I felt it made the book weak and unsatisfying. I don't think it's a matter of being a YA book because, as we are all aware, YA books and books for even younger readers are often much richer in character and plot development than this.I also found myself extremely frustrated and irritated with the author's seemingly obvious attempt to be clever in her naming of people and things in the book, and I thought it was just silly and stupid. Also, some of the things, like a witch baby being born and delivered to their house was just odd. I am a huge fan of sci-fi and fantasy, so it's not the fact that these elements were present in this book that bothered me, but the way they were delivered.I appreciate the author's message of love and acceptance, but I think it would have been delivered more effectively in a text richer with plot and character development and less emphasis placed on just being clever for the sake of being clever.I chose the VOYA rating of 1Q: Hard to understand how it got published except in relation to its P rating (and not even then sometimes). The book covers a wide range of topics, such as sex, sexual identity, acceptance, and love, that appeal to YA readers, but the author didn't delve deep enough into each, or even one, of these topics, leaving me wanting more. I chose the Popularity rating as 3P: Will appeal to teens with pushing. Again, while the book covered subject matter that is appealing to teens, I think they could pick up this subject matter more effectively from other books that covers/presents it better.One quote from the book that I believe will stimulate discussion: "Love is a dangerous angel" (p. 15).read more
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I loved Block's writing - at times, it read just like poetry. It was very creative and unusual. I liked that it was different - a blending of a fairytale but also stark reality and dark themes. I think some teen readers might be put off but that, but overall, it's definitely a memorable, noteworthy book for teens.read more
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Oh my, did I find this book tiresome. Written in a sort of twee stream-of-consciousness, the book centers on Weetzie Bat, who begins by mentioning how she doesn't like high school, and then ceases to be any sort of recognizable teenager (or human being) for the rest of the book.Weetzie lives in LA (or Shangra-L.A, or Hell-A, as it's referred to) with her best friend Dirk and her dog. They go hunting for "Ducks" (boys) and eventually meet up with agenie who grants WEetzie three wishes - that Dirk finds his Duck, that she finds her "Secret Agent Lover Man" and that they all have a house and live happily ever after. This all comes true, to a degree, albeit with complications, such as her Secret Agent Lover Man's baby with another woman, and a friend's death from AIDS (though it's non mentioned by name).It's *insanely* 80s, to the point that I started looking for coke and the Go-Gosin the binding. There's and obsession with the Hollywood theatricality of LA, via constant old-school name dropping and a candy-coating of what I assume is meant to magical realism but is just utterly annoying. (The "look at me, I'm Kate Bush" author photo on the back nearly put me over the edge.) There's an actual story trying to break through in how Weetzie deals with life - love, wanting and having a baby, her father's death - but the author seems so intent on tone and style that plot or coherence falls far off the track.It's short, at least.What to read next: for 80s? Bright Lights, Big City; Less Than Zero; Slaves of New York. (Or go watch Fast Times at Ridgemont High) If they liked the TinkerBell grown up and doing X nature of the writing, well, I have no idea. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas? Or Breakfast at Tiffany's, who is Weetzie 30 years earlier and with a better writer.read more
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4Q-I gave "Weetzie Bat" this rating because while it is unique and enjoyable, I feel that the author's style is one of telling and not showing. It is difficult to get into Weetzie's head, or that of any of the other characters. This story is beautiful and glittery and appealing, but not necessarily engaging in the sense that readers fall into and lose themselves in the story. The character and setting descriptions are huge appeal factors for this book. I have it a 4P, because, while I think many young people would find this book interesting, it's definitely not going to be everyone's taste and may take some convincing to persuade a reader to pick it up.read more
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I found the whole thing to be overall charming- weird in some sections, other sections I would want to live in. I will read the next in the series and see where it takes me!read more
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Living in L.A. - or Shangri-LA - punky Weetzie Bat befriends the most beautiful boy in her high school only to discover that he is gay. Together, they roam the streets "duck hunting," hoping to find a match for each of them. When Weetzie uncovers a magical genie who grants her three wishes, it appears that their troubles have come to a close. However, all is not as it seems, and L.A. is always ready to throw Weetzie and her band of misfits a curve-ball. Block's language is poetic and her style is minimalist, leading the leader by the nose through Weetzie's adventures. This book is sexy, wise, and pertinent, addressing teen (and adult) issues without the preachiness typical of the genre. While admittedly unusual, Weetzie Bat is also unforgettably lovely, and certainly the time you will spend with this petite novella.read more
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In a class at the iSchool, this was the first of ten Young Adult novels that we read, and in the end I liked it best. It's postmodern, enviably hip, deeply open-minded, and it describes a dark, glittery post punk 80s LA that I can't get out of my head. The language is great, almost prose poetry. Drugs, divorce, alcoholism, AIDS, punk and queer alienation. This book has plenty of dark subject matter; sometimes the rendering is detached, LA Magical Realism, sometimes it is believable human sadness or anger. Weetzie lives in a cute bungalow with 2 gay guys, Slinkster Dog, and Witch Baby. They cruise LA in an old car, surf, and have surreal adventures. The lesson, I guess, is to get family where you can find it, and, in turn, offer your own love to people who need it. But I mostly like this book because it's so cool.read more
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I have to say that I agree totally and completely with what She-ra77 said in the review of this book. I didn't like it at all and had to force myself to keep reading. I didn't identify with Weetzie as a person nor did her circumstances in life form any kind of connection. I was totally thrown by the lack of time and plot and character development in the book. It was written in a way that I didn't understand or like. While I have since read more about the book and it's reception, while reading the book myself, I was surprised that it was published. One a positive note, despite the lack of description and detail and time progression through the book, I felt as though it really captured the 80s feel. It did quite well of capturing the attitude and mindset of teens at the time and the issues covered such as the relationship Weetzie had with her parents, her relationship with Duck, Duck's relationships to her and others, her behaviors and understanding of things, and of course, the underlying fear and social rejection in regards to HIV and AIDs, well I really think it captured the time in which it was written quite well. My sister was in her teens when this came out and I can easily see her reading it and liking it. It's obviously dated and compared to a lot of popular books out today, it is somewhat lacking, though people like it and thus, it still remains relevant.read more
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This is a stunning book. Part of me wanted there to be more of it because it was so good, but of course the sparseness of the prose is part of what makes this book so beautiful. There is no character like Weetzie anywhere else in literature, and you can't help but love her.read more
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I loved this book! I found it to be so poignant and bittersweet as the characters try to make sense of the world around them. In spite of everything they have faced, the death of Secret Agent's grandmother, Weetzie's parents' divorce, and Duck's experience with AIDS, Weetzie maintains her positive outlook on life and belief in the power of love. "She knew they were all afraid. But love and disease are both like electricity....We can choose...we can choose to plug into the love current instead." (p. 88). The characters remind me very much of my younger son, a nontraditional musician type, now 22, who is still trying to find his way.read more
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...Love is a dangerous angel. I wish I could make three wishes...read more
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This book is very interesting. It's like someone took a 400-paged story and condensed it into 100 pages, which is interesting. It's an incredibly quick read, but due to the summary feel, a little difficult to get into.

Once you do get into the book, the story line is incredible. Block does a fantastic job of make the short story have heart by the end of the book and even though you don't quite understand the characters, you want them to succeed and be happy.

This is a great book for young adults because it shows all kinds of love and how it can survive through thick and thin in a healthy and strong way.read more
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A quick, quirky book that I adore.read more
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A curiousity of a book written in luminous, yet simplistic language. You can sit down and have it read in two hours, easily. The story follows Weetzie Bat, her gay friends Dirk and Duck, her lover, Secret Agent Lover Man, and a montage of other curious characters. Set in glittering LA, Weetzie Bat deals with issues like divorce, friendship, happily-ever-after love, pregnancy, homosexuality, and the ever-present bittersweetness of loving and losing. Along the way there's even elements of the fantastic, including a genie and a witch.I had a difficult time connecting with this story. Probably because I was never a quirky, Indian-headress-wearing, drinking teenager. My parents weren't divorced, I don't have close homosexual friends, and the glitz and glam of Hollywood doesn't particularly appeal to me. That said, however, I can see how this quirky little story would definitely appeal to some young adults dealing with the angst of relationships, their futures and the desire to live happily every after while maintaining their own quirky personalities. As a fast read, it's also perfect for reluctant readers.read more
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This is one of the oddest 88 page story I have ever read. If I was a teen in 1989, this book might have been my bible. However, reading it now just makes the heightened fantasy world of Los Angeles or “Shangri-L.A.” seem out of touch and phony.What I didn't like: You can’t write about your best friend coming out, a threesome with him and his' lover, AIDS, suicide via overdose and raising your boyfriends lovechild with another women while raising the baby that could be your own or it could be a product of the threesome in 88 pages. There is no development and no growth with the characters. I am sure that the time it was amazing, but now it just leaves me, the reader, empty. I will give props to have these subjects mentioned at all, but to not develop any themes further seems like a disservice to talking about them in the first place. What I liked: Besides reading about some of my favorite shops and restaurants in L.A. the thing that this book had going for itself was the fact it is a precursor to one of my favorite YA books of all time Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist. Both books have youth that are ultra hip living out their desires in the big city which can be seen as glamorous to outsiders, but can have some harsh realities as well. I really felt the connection between the two books especially when it mentioned The Beatles and the song "I Want to Hold Your Hand." N and N was a book that I was too old to read as a teen, but it spoke to me as if it was written for me unlike Weetzie Bat. If you haven’t read Nick and Norah please pick it up.read more
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Very fast-paced, an unbelievably quick read, with characters so odd you love them. I liked it far more the first time I read it, and I'm not crazy about the sequels - but Weetzie is still high on my list of amazing books.read more
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This story has a very particular style that I find hard to describe and the characters seem to float along in an almost dream-like manner. It's also difficult to classify by genre because it is mostly a historical fiction following a teen as she grows up in L.A. in the 60's, but there are elements of the fantastic and magical as well.I rated it as a 5Q because within it's odd style, this story is perfectly written. Every phrase is distinctly chosen and crafted for a specific sense or feeling. The metaphors are luscious and stick in my mind like peanut butter and white bread sandwich to the roof of my mouth.I believe it is a 4P because not everyone wants to read this style of writing or follow the free and love-filled choices of Weetzie. Everyone would connect with the caring, sadness and grief she and her patchwork family experience. Some would find the story particularly offensive because of the family Weetzie has, makes, and keeps.I did not like this book and was relieved it was quite brief--though I can't actually find fault with it either. I don't think reading it as an ebook on Kindle changed anything in my perception of it, though I was disappointed to see that the publisher doesn't give this ebook the cover image. I did enjoy the highlighting and note-taking functions which I had never been inclined to use before.read more
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A beautiful fairy-tale vision of L.A. life in the 80's.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
strange and beautiful; a surreal love letter to Los Angeles from the heart of a unique soul..this was one of my very favorite books as an alienated teenager, and still is, 20 years later... a very unique voyage into a very interesting world that isn't entirely fictional. Recommended for all you weirdos not unlike myself, who are looking for something different and written with heart and flourish.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The author addresses serious social issues in the ups and downs of Weetzie's life without the doom and preachiness of some other coming-of-age books, often leaving implications unsaid for the readers to judge for themselves. The narrative is filled with vivid imagery from the author's whimsical similes and colorful descriptions of favorite local haunts, good eats, and amateur filmmaking experiences in their free-spirited L.A. lifestyle. Nonetheless, except for the whimsical similes and vivid imagery, I didn't like it. The author seemed to be trying too hard to pack in too many taboo issues and break every convention so as to draw attention to the work. If the title Clueless hadn't been already taken by a film, I'd have suggested that as an alternate title. Instead, we're stuck with one of the most irritating names ever.Oh, and the only magical realism in it is really a couple of ridiculous plot devices including a genie that just shows up conveniently but out of the blue (and never to be seen or mentioned again) in order to make the story possible.
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the style is very fast paced, but really has a good undertone. also just fun to read, kinda out there.
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Weetzie Bat is a strange, thin little book about a teenager living in Los Angeles. Over the course of the story, she goes from having a broken home to creating a family of her own, consisting of a gay couple, her My Secret Agent Lover Man (that's her boyfriend's actual name), her baby, her boyfriend's witch baby, and numerous dogs. It has elements of the fantastical, and at times feels like a queer love letter to L.A. in all its flashy impermanence.I didn't enjoy this book. I found it shallow, and I never cared about any of the characters. That being said, I don't think I was the intended audience. Weetzie Bat would be a PERFECT book for high schooler who is below reading level. The writing is simplistic, but deals with teenage-level topics. The main character has a threesome with her two gay, male best friends, even though it is not written about in inappropriate detail. It's a perfect gateway book to more advanced reading
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This was required reading for me, and I often enjoy whimsical writing and fairy tales, but this one didn't do much for me. There's very little detail about what the characters are thinking or who they are outside the context of their role in the story. Weetzie hangs out with Dirk avoiding the lame high school kids who don't understand them, and when she finds a genie in a bottle she wishes for a boyfriend for herself, one for Dirk, and a place to live. She gets all three, but when her boyfriend doesn't want to have a baby with her, she resorts to some unusual means to get one. I also thought that Weetzie didn't reflect on or learn from any of the things that happened to her or the choices she made. The characters go through very little, if any, character development, and when they make questionable decisions or life throws hurdles at them, a magic solution appears out of this air or the problem goes away. No one has to do or learn anything. Would Weetzie make the same manipulative choices if she and her boyfriend disagreed on something other than child rearing? Nothing tells me she wouldn't. I usually like stories that have a fairy-tale quality, magical realism and themes of love and a makeshift family, but this one was not for me. The message of this book, love your friends and everything will turn out exactly how you want, seems guaranteed to disappoint.
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Plug into the love current. A great YA read!
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4Q, 4PI appreciated Weetzie Bat for the simplicity of the writing, yet complexity of the subjects. In such a short amount of time, Francesca Lia Block wove a story of friendship, loss, love, longing and trust. Entire books are written on complexities of same sex relationships, broken marriages, alcohol and drugs, broken trust, unfaithful behavior, death, desire, parenthood and fear of the unknown. By writing such short, but powerful anecdotes of these weighty topics, the reader gains enough context and insight to understand the overall message. While the first few pages of the story led me to believe this was going to be about bored kids looking for trouble, I learned at the end of chapter one, the story was truly about respectful, loving relationships. Weetsie is an honest, accepting, caring, person who sets the bar high for all of us.
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This was an odd read for me. It was so incredibly surreal, it was almost dreamlike. This only added to the book's charm though. Very real issues were lying under the surface (AIDS, divorce, homosexuality, etc.), and a lot of them didn't even stand out to me until after I had finished the book. I thought about this book for days after finishing it.
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I'm not sure why I liked this story so much, but it may be because there is a magical fairy-tale quality to it.
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Now begins a phase of young adult literature and I cannot think of a better introduction than the poetic, musical eclectic modern day fairly tale by Francesca Lia Block. It was truly a joy to read!YA566-5Q, YA566-5P
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I gave this book a 3Q rating because the writing was interesting but not incredible. I gave it a popularity rating of 3P because I feel that some teens will really enjoy it, but that it is a very distinctive style that may not have broad appeal. Personally I thought that the book was unique. I liked the fantasy and punk feel of it. I also liked the character of Weetzie. The serious issues woven into the fantasy kept this book interesting. I missed having character development. Everyone but Weetzie, and even her at times, felt like cardboard cuttouts. I didn't feel a connection with any of them, which took away from my enjoyment of the story.
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I picked up this book at a library book sale. I thought it sounded interesting and I had heard good things about it. I even liked the size of this little book that I could manage to carry everywhere with me. I will say that the characters are definitely quirky. But ya' know, I really really liked them. I read this in two days. The characters are this funky hodge-podge of people who wind up together and grow to love one another. Each character is distinctly different. The imagery is amazing, little interesting jewels tucked in here and there. There is some sex in the book. Despite it's funkiness or because of it, I'm giving this one 3 1/2 big ol' kisses
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I have to say, I did not care for this book at all. It lacked character and plot development and was way over simplistic for my taste. This is probably what the author was going for, as I can't figure out any other reason for it, but I felt it made the book weak and unsatisfying. I don't think it's a matter of being a YA book because, as we are all aware, YA books and books for even younger readers are often much richer in character and plot development than this.I also found myself extremely frustrated and irritated with the author's seemingly obvious attempt to be clever in her naming of people and things in the book, and I thought it was just silly and stupid. Also, some of the things, like a witch baby being born and delivered to their house was just odd. I am a huge fan of sci-fi and fantasy, so it's not the fact that these elements were present in this book that bothered me, but the way they were delivered.I appreciate the author's message of love and acceptance, but I think it would have been delivered more effectively in a text richer with plot and character development and less emphasis placed on just being clever for the sake of being clever.I chose the VOYA rating of 1Q: Hard to understand how it got published except in relation to its P rating (and not even then sometimes). The book covers a wide range of topics, such as sex, sexual identity, acceptance, and love, that appeal to YA readers, but the author didn't delve deep enough into each, or even one, of these topics, leaving me wanting more. I chose the Popularity rating as 3P: Will appeal to teens with pushing. Again, while the book covered subject matter that is appealing to teens, I think they could pick up this subject matter more effectively from other books that covers/presents it better.One quote from the book that I believe will stimulate discussion: "Love is a dangerous angel" (p. 15).
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I loved Block's writing - at times, it read just like poetry. It was very creative and unusual. I liked that it was different - a blending of a fairytale but also stark reality and dark themes. I think some teen readers might be put off but that, but overall, it's definitely a memorable, noteworthy book for teens.
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Oh my, did I find this book tiresome. Written in a sort of twee stream-of-consciousness, the book centers on Weetzie Bat, who begins by mentioning how she doesn't like high school, and then ceases to be any sort of recognizable teenager (or human being) for the rest of the book.Weetzie lives in LA (or Shangra-L.A, or Hell-A, as it's referred to) with her best friend Dirk and her dog. They go hunting for "Ducks" (boys) and eventually meet up with agenie who grants WEetzie three wishes - that Dirk finds his Duck, that she finds her "Secret Agent Lover Man" and that they all have a house and live happily ever after. This all comes true, to a degree, albeit with complications, such as her Secret Agent Lover Man's baby with another woman, and a friend's death from AIDS (though it's non mentioned by name).It's *insanely* 80s, to the point that I started looking for coke and the Go-Gosin the binding. There's and obsession with the Hollywood theatricality of LA, via constant old-school name dropping and a candy-coating of what I assume is meant to magical realism but is just utterly annoying. (The "look at me, I'm Kate Bush" author photo on the back nearly put me over the edge.) There's an actual story trying to break through in how Weetzie deals with life - love, wanting and having a baby, her father's death - but the author seems so intent on tone and style that plot or coherence falls far off the track.It's short, at least.What to read next: for 80s? Bright Lights, Big City; Less Than Zero; Slaves of New York. (Or go watch Fast Times at Ridgemont High) If they liked the TinkerBell grown up and doing X nature of the writing, well, I have no idea. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas? Or Breakfast at Tiffany's, who is Weetzie 30 years earlier and with a better writer.
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4Q-I gave "Weetzie Bat" this rating because while it is unique and enjoyable, I feel that the author's style is one of telling and not showing. It is difficult to get into Weetzie's head, or that of any of the other characters. This story is beautiful and glittery and appealing, but not necessarily engaging in the sense that readers fall into and lose themselves in the story. The character and setting descriptions are huge appeal factors for this book. I have it a 4P, because, while I think many young people would find this book interesting, it's definitely not going to be everyone's taste and may take some convincing to persuade a reader to pick it up.
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I found the whole thing to be overall charming- weird in some sections, other sections I would want to live in. I will read the next in the series and see where it takes me!
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Living in L.A. - or Shangri-LA - punky Weetzie Bat befriends the most beautiful boy in her high school only to discover that he is gay. Together, they roam the streets "duck hunting," hoping to find a match for each of them. When Weetzie uncovers a magical genie who grants her three wishes, it appears that their troubles have come to a close. However, all is not as it seems, and L.A. is always ready to throw Weetzie and her band of misfits a curve-ball. Block's language is poetic and her style is minimalist, leading the leader by the nose through Weetzie's adventures. This book is sexy, wise, and pertinent, addressing teen (and adult) issues without the preachiness typical of the genre. While admittedly unusual, Weetzie Bat is also unforgettably lovely, and certainly the time you will spend with this petite novella.
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In a class at the iSchool, this was the first of ten Young Adult novels that we read, and in the end I liked it best. It's postmodern, enviably hip, deeply open-minded, and it describes a dark, glittery post punk 80s LA that I can't get out of my head. The language is great, almost prose poetry. Drugs, divorce, alcoholism, AIDS, punk and queer alienation. This book has plenty of dark subject matter; sometimes the rendering is detached, LA Magical Realism, sometimes it is believable human sadness or anger. Weetzie lives in a cute bungalow with 2 gay guys, Slinkster Dog, and Witch Baby. They cruise LA in an old car, surf, and have surreal adventures. The lesson, I guess, is to get family where you can find it, and, in turn, offer your own love to people who need it. But I mostly like this book because it's so cool.
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I have to say that I agree totally and completely with what She-ra77 said in the review of this book. I didn't like it at all and had to force myself to keep reading. I didn't identify with Weetzie as a person nor did her circumstances in life form any kind of connection. I was totally thrown by the lack of time and plot and character development in the book. It was written in a way that I didn't understand or like. While I have since read more about the book and it's reception, while reading the book myself, I was surprised that it was published. One a positive note, despite the lack of description and detail and time progression through the book, I felt as though it really captured the 80s feel. It did quite well of capturing the attitude and mindset of teens at the time and the issues covered such as the relationship Weetzie had with her parents, her relationship with Duck, Duck's relationships to her and others, her behaviors and understanding of things, and of course, the underlying fear and social rejection in regards to HIV and AIDs, well I really think it captured the time in which it was written quite well. My sister was in her teens when this came out and I can easily see her reading it and liking it. It's obviously dated and compared to a lot of popular books out today, it is somewhat lacking, though people like it and thus, it still remains relevant.
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This is a stunning book. Part of me wanted there to be more of it because it was so good, but of course the sparseness of the prose is part of what makes this book so beautiful. There is no character like Weetzie anywhere else in literature, and you can't help but love her.
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I loved this book! I found it to be so poignant and bittersweet as the characters try to make sense of the world around them. In spite of everything they have faced, the death of Secret Agent's grandmother, Weetzie's parents' divorce, and Duck's experience with AIDS, Weetzie maintains her positive outlook on life and belief in the power of love. "She knew they were all afraid. But love and disease are both like electricity....We can choose...we can choose to plug into the love current instead." (p. 88). The characters remind me very much of my younger son, a nontraditional musician type, now 22, who is still trying to find his way.
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...Love is a dangerous angel. I wish I could make three wishes...
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This book is very interesting. It's like someone took a 400-paged story and condensed it into 100 pages, which is interesting. It's an incredibly quick read, but due to the summary feel, a little difficult to get into.

Once you do get into the book, the story line is incredible. Block does a fantastic job of make the short story have heart by the end of the book and even though you don't quite understand the characters, you want them to succeed and be happy.

This is a great book for young adults because it shows all kinds of love and how it can survive through thick and thin in a healthy and strong way.
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A quick, quirky book that I adore.
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A curiousity of a book written in luminous, yet simplistic language. You can sit down and have it read in two hours, easily. The story follows Weetzie Bat, her gay friends Dirk and Duck, her lover, Secret Agent Lover Man, and a montage of other curious characters. Set in glittering LA, Weetzie Bat deals with issues like divorce, friendship, happily-ever-after love, pregnancy, homosexuality, and the ever-present bittersweetness of loving and losing. Along the way there's even elements of the fantastic, including a genie and a witch.I had a difficult time connecting with this story. Probably because I was never a quirky, Indian-headress-wearing, drinking teenager. My parents weren't divorced, I don't have close homosexual friends, and the glitz and glam of Hollywood doesn't particularly appeal to me. That said, however, I can see how this quirky little story would definitely appeal to some young adults dealing with the angst of relationships, their futures and the desire to live happily every after while maintaining their own quirky personalities. As a fast read, it's also perfect for reluctant readers.
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This is one of the oddest 88 page story I have ever read. If I was a teen in 1989, this book might have been my bible. However, reading it now just makes the heightened fantasy world of Los Angeles or “Shangri-L.A.” seem out of touch and phony.What I didn't like: You can’t write about your best friend coming out, a threesome with him and his' lover, AIDS, suicide via overdose and raising your boyfriends lovechild with another women while raising the baby that could be your own or it could be a product of the threesome in 88 pages. There is no development and no growth with the characters. I am sure that the time it was amazing, but now it just leaves me, the reader, empty. I will give props to have these subjects mentioned at all, but to not develop any themes further seems like a disservice to talking about them in the first place. What I liked: Besides reading about some of my favorite shops and restaurants in L.A. the thing that this book had going for itself was the fact it is a precursor to one of my favorite YA books of all time Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist. Both books have youth that are ultra hip living out their desires in the big city which can be seen as glamorous to outsiders, but can have some harsh realities as well. I really felt the connection between the two books especially when it mentioned The Beatles and the song "I Want to Hold Your Hand." N and N was a book that I was too old to read as a teen, but it spoke to me as if it was written for me unlike Weetzie Bat. If you haven’t read Nick and Norah please pick it up.
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Very fast-paced, an unbelievably quick read, with characters so odd you love them. I liked it far more the first time I read it, and I'm not crazy about the sequels - but Weetzie is still high on my list of amazing books.
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This story has a very particular style that I find hard to describe and the characters seem to float along in an almost dream-like manner. It's also difficult to classify by genre because it is mostly a historical fiction following a teen as she grows up in L.A. in the 60's, but there are elements of the fantastic and magical as well.I rated it as a 5Q because within it's odd style, this story is perfectly written. Every phrase is distinctly chosen and crafted for a specific sense or feeling. The metaphors are luscious and stick in my mind like peanut butter and white bread sandwich to the roof of my mouth.I believe it is a 4P because not everyone wants to read this style of writing or follow the free and love-filled choices of Weetzie. Everyone would connect with the caring, sadness and grief she and her patchwork family experience. Some would find the story particularly offensive because of the family Weetzie has, makes, and keeps.I did not like this book and was relieved it was quite brief--though I can't actually find fault with it either. I don't think reading it as an ebook on Kindle changed anything in my perception of it, though I was disappointed to see that the publisher doesn't give this ebook the cover image. I did enjoy the highlighting and note-taking functions which I had never been inclined to use before.
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