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In a clash of heroes, the kingdom is born.

At the end of the ninth century, King Alfred of Wessex is in ill health; his heir, an untested youth. His enemy, the Danes, having failed to conquer Wessex, now see their chance for victory. Led by the sword of savage warrior Harald Bloodhair, the Viking hordes attack. But Uhtred, Alfred's reluctant warlord, proves his worth, outwitting Harald and handing the Vikings one of their greatest defeats.

For Uhtred, the sweetness of victory is soon overshadowed by tragedy. Breaking with Alfred, he joins the Vikings, swearing never again to serve the Saxon king. Instead, he will reclaim his ancestral fortress on the Northumbrian coast. Allied with his old friend Ragnar—and his old foe Haesten—he aims to invade and conquer Wessex itself.

Yet fate has different plans. The Danes of East Anglia and the Vikings of Northumbria are plotting the conquest of all Britain. When Alfred's daughter pleads with Uhtred for help, he cannot refuse her request. In a desperate gamble, he takes command of a demoralized Mercian army, leading them in an unforgettable battle on a blood-soaked field beside the Thames.

In The Burning Land, Bernard Cornwell, "the reigning king of historical fiction" (USA Today), delivers a rousing saga of Anglo-Saxon England—an irresistible new chapter in his thrilling Saxon Tales, the epic story of the birth of England and the legendary king who made it possible.

Published: HarperCollins on Mar 2, 2010
ISBN: 9780061966095
List price: $11.88
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 Cornwell is keeping the action flowing, but the main character of this series seems to be invincible. I guess that is the point. Overall, a nice 5th addition to what is probably my favorite series. I wish Cornwell wrote longer books, but I am beginning to understand that if he did, we wouldn't be getting them every year. I guess I can hope to see another installment next January. If not, I'm positive whatever Cornwell writes will be added to my library. I am now a hardcore fan.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Burning Land is Cornwell's fifth book in the Saxon Chronicles that take place during the reign of the ninth century English king, Alfred the Great. The stories' protagonist is Uhtred of Bebbanburg, a warrior born in Northumbria, but raised as a Dane. The devout Christian Alfred is trying to create "England" by melding together his Wessex with Mercia, East Anglia and, eventually Northumbria, but he repeatedly finds himself in need of aid from the pagan Uhtred.This book is more of the same. Uhtred is pulled between his Danish roots and his oath to the Saxon king. The book features numerous skirmishes and one big battle as the climax. Uhtred's perpetual inconstant attitude does grow a bit wearisome, but not so much as to turn me against the series. Cornwell gets the known historical details right (for example, Alfred's use of the `burh' system of fortresses), but the relatively sparse record also leaves much room for speculation.If you have enjoyed the previous books in the series, you will want to continue. If you are new to the series, you can enjoy this book as a standalone and then go back to read the previous installments (Of course, it is better to start at the beginning. The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Chronicles Series #1)) Cornwell rarely disappoints his loyal readers and The Burning Land is no exception.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In his fifth book of the Saxon series “The Burning Land” Bernard Cornwell strikes gold once again. Chock full of all the candor and brutality I have come to expect from Mr. Cornwell, “The Burning Land” entertained me from vicious beginning to its bowel loosening ferocious bloody end. What I truly enjoy about Mr. Cornwell’s stories are the modest vignettes he paints with his primary and ancillary characters. Such as when Uhtred gave the crying milkmaid a silver coin after she spilled the contents of her cans trying to bow to the warlord. According to his website, Mr. Cornwell is currently working on the next Saxon installment hopefully he can keep the streak going.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

 Cornwell is keeping the action flowing, but the main character of this series seems to be invincible. I guess that is the point. Overall, a nice 5th addition to what is probably my favorite series. I wish Cornwell wrote longer books, but I am beginning to understand that if he did, we wouldn't be getting them every year. I guess I can hope to see another installment next January. If not, I'm positive whatever Cornwell writes will be added to my library. I am now a hardcore fan.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Burning Land is Cornwell's fifth book in the Saxon Chronicles that take place during the reign of the ninth century English king, Alfred the Great. The stories' protagonist is Uhtred of Bebbanburg, a warrior born in Northumbria, but raised as a Dane. The devout Christian Alfred is trying to create "England" by melding together his Wessex with Mercia, East Anglia and, eventually Northumbria, but he repeatedly finds himself in need of aid from the pagan Uhtred.This book is more of the same. Uhtred is pulled between his Danish roots and his oath to the Saxon king. The book features numerous skirmishes and one big battle as the climax. Uhtred's perpetual inconstant attitude does grow a bit wearisome, but not so much as to turn me against the series. Cornwell gets the known historical details right (for example, Alfred's use of the `burh' system of fortresses), but the relatively sparse record also leaves much room for speculation.If you have enjoyed the previous books in the series, you will want to continue. If you are new to the series, you can enjoy this book as a standalone and then go back to read the previous installments (Of course, it is better to start at the beginning. The Last Kingdom (The Saxon Chronicles Series #1)) Cornwell rarely disappoints his loyal readers and The Burning Land is no exception.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In his fifth book of the Saxon series “The Burning Land” Bernard Cornwell strikes gold once again. Chock full of all the candor and brutality I have come to expect from Mr. Cornwell, “The Burning Land” entertained me from vicious beginning to its bowel loosening ferocious bloody end. What I truly enjoy about Mr. Cornwell’s stories are the modest vignettes he paints with his primary and ancillary characters. Such as when Uhtred gave the crying milkmaid a silver coin after she spilled the contents of her cans trying to bow to the warlord. According to his website, Mr. Cornwell is currently working on the next Saxon installment hopefully he can keep the streak going.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A return to form for Cornwell although there is also a return to the formula that made the Sharpe series so engrossing and so frustrating. Uhtred is still a compelling mixture of honour and savagery but his essential dishonesty and heroic pride echo Sharpe more strongly than I would wish. It is probably unhelpful to list Cornwell's tropes since this is no place to begin a journey with him and should you make it this far through the Alfred series then you must be able to tolerate them. It is my guess that Cornwell intends this to be another long series and, as a single episode in the middle, it is not surprising that this feels to be truncated. For all these flaws, I do commend this to those who may have had doubts after Sword Song.
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A fine edition to the Saxon Series. However, as this is now the fifth book in this series the parallels between Uthred and Derfel Cadarn of the Warlord Chronicles are becoming all the more apparent. Those remain my favourite books that Cornwell has written to date and I would personally rather that Derfel be left more as a stand-alone character. As this era of English history has been little examined in historical fiction more additions to the series are naturally to be sincerely welcomed.
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The latest book in Cornwell's Saxon series. If you've read any of the others there's not much to say - Vikings, shield walls, axes, death, Thor, dismemberment... A good time. I continue to enjoy the series.
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