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Despite being cursed with a boy's name, Kevin "Vi" Connelly is seriously female and a committed romantic. The affliction hit at the tender age of six when she was handed a basket of flower petals and ensnared by the "marry-tale." The thrill, the attention, the big white dress—it's the Best Day of Your Life, and it's seriously addictive. But at twenty-seven, with a closetful of pricey bridesmaid dresses she'll never wear again, a trunkful of embarrassing memories, and an empty bank account from paying for it all, the illusion of matrimony as the Answer to Everything begins to fray. As her friends' choices don't provide answers, and her family confuses her more, Vi faces off against her eminently untrustworthy boyfriend and the veracity of the BDOYL.

Eleven weddings in eighteen months would send any sane woman either over the edge or scurrying for the altar. But as reality separates from illusion, Vi learns that letting go of someone else's story to write your own may be harder than buying the myth, but just might help her make the right choices for herself.

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061853258
List price: $10.36
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I used to watch Friends on TV. That was back when we lived in England. The networks showed it late at night when my kids were safe in bed. Then we moved to the States and it was shown at 6pm. No way could we persuade the kids to do homework while Mum and Dad sat on the sofa in front of the box, so no more Friends. And we never saw a single Friends wedding.Anyway, if you liked Friends, you’ll probably like Kerry Reich’s book, The Best Day of Someone Else’s Life, coming out in May 2008. It’s filled with characters and relationships that reminded me of the TV series, as twenty-somethings sit drinking wine, teasing the wine-waiter, and sharing the ups and downs of their big-city lives. The action moves between Washington DC and North Carolina, where the protagonist grew up, and where the first weddings take place. “Eleven weddings in eighteen months,” it says on the back cover, though I thought I counted more…The protagonist, Vi, uses mixed-up movie titles to label her life, and I’m pretty sure Four Weddings and a Funeral came in there somewhere. It’s one of my favorite movies, and one I thought of often as I read. I even found myself wondering what a movie of The Best Day… would be like, and though I’m hopeless at identifying movie stars, I certainly had some very clear pictures in mind of how the characters would look and sound.Kerry does a really good job with dialog. Movie names that I didn’t recognize, store names that may or may not have been real, different types of wine, and a pretty large cast of characters – everything seemed very clear just from the speakers’ tone of voice. The transitions from big city to small town pulled me along beautifully, despite my limited knowledge of American life. And I loved the chance to see behind the scenes of “the America Wedding.” (I must admit, I’m very glad I only have sons.)At 431 pages, Vi’s story, from excited six-year-old in the first chapter to genuine, well-rounded adult in the conclusion, is quite a long read. However, it’s perfectly designed for someone who isn’t aiming to finish a whole story in one sitting. The book rewards being set down between chapters, with characters that stay with the reader as if you’ve really met them, and with deft reintroductions of ideas that help you remember what’s going on. It’s the sort of book that you don’t need to flip back through, to see who was whose friend, or why Vi’s upset with her mother; an easy, relaxing read, but not a trivial one. In the end, besides being entertaining, the book really does make you think about what weddings and marriage might mean.read more
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Reviews

I used to watch Friends on TV. That was back when we lived in England. The networks showed it late at night when my kids were safe in bed. Then we moved to the States and it was shown at 6pm. No way could we persuade the kids to do homework while Mum and Dad sat on the sofa in front of the box, so no more Friends. And we never saw a single Friends wedding.Anyway, if you liked Friends, you’ll probably like Kerry Reich’s book, The Best Day of Someone Else’s Life, coming out in May 2008. It’s filled with characters and relationships that reminded me of the TV series, as twenty-somethings sit drinking wine, teasing the wine-waiter, and sharing the ups and downs of their big-city lives. The action moves between Washington DC and North Carolina, where the protagonist grew up, and where the first weddings take place. “Eleven weddings in eighteen months,” it says on the back cover, though I thought I counted more…The protagonist, Vi, uses mixed-up movie titles to label her life, and I’m pretty sure Four Weddings and a Funeral came in there somewhere. It’s one of my favorite movies, and one I thought of often as I read. I even found myself wondering what a movie of The Best Day… would be like, and though I’m hopeless at identifying movie stars, I certainly had some very clear pictures in mind of how the characters would look and sound.Kerry does a really good job with dialog. Movie names that I didn’t recognize, store names that may or may not have been real, different types of wine, and a pretty large cast of characters – everything seemed very clear just from the speakers’ tone of voice. The transitions from big city to small town pulled me along beautifully, despite my limited knowledge of American life. And I loved the chance to see behind the scenes of “the America Wedding.” (I must admit, I’m very glad I only have sons.)At 431 pages, Vi’s story, from excited six-year-old in the first chapter to genuine, well-rounded adult in the conclusion, is quite a long read. However, it’s perfectly designed for someone who isn’t aiming to finish a whole story in one sitting. The book rewards being set down between chapters, with characters that stay with the reader as if you’ve really met them, and with deft reintroductions of ideas that help you remember what’s going on. It’s the sort of book that you don’t need to flip back through, to see who was whose friend, or why Vi’s upset with her mother; an easy, relaxing read, but not a trivial one. In the end, besides being entertaining, the book really does make you think about what weddings and marriage might mean.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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