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What would you do if your eighty-year-old father dragged you into his hell-bent hunt for new love? Bob Morris, a seriously single son, tells you all about it in this warm, witty, and wacky chronicle of a year of dating dangerously.

A few months after the death of his wife, Joe Morris, an affable, eccentric, bridge-obsessed octogenarian, starts flapping about for a replacement. If he can get a new hip, he figures, why not a new wife? At first, his son Bob is appalled, but suspicion quickly turns to enthusiasm as he finds himself trolling the personals, screening prospects, and offering etiquette tips, chaperoning services, and post-date assessments to his needy father.

Bob hopes that Joe will find a well-heeled lady—or at least one who is very patient—to get him out of his hair. But soon they discover that finding a new mate will not be as easy as they think: one date is too morose, another too liberal; one's a three-timer, another just needs an escort until Mr. Right comes along. Dad persists and son assists. Am I pimping for my father? he begins to wonder.

Meanwhile, Bob suffers similar frustrations; trying to find love isn't easy in a big-city market that has little use for a middle-aged gay man with an attitude and a paunch. But with the encouragement of his father (his biggest fan and the world's "most democratic Republican") he prevails. In the end, this memoir becomes a twin love story and a soulful lesson about giving and receiving affection with an open heart.

With wicked humor and a dollop of compassion, Bob Morris gleefully explores the impact of senior parents on their boomer kids and the perils of dating at any age.

Topics: LGBTQ

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061863479
List price: $10.99
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After a long and debilitating disease takes Ethel Morris' life, her husband Joe, at 80 years old, is eager to date again only a few months later. He enlists his son Bob, this book's author, to help him by calling personals for him and listening to his dating trials. Meanwhile, Bob is having dating woes of his own. (And don’t be followed by the book’s subtitle – the only thing that resembles a double date in this book comes in the last 20 pages.) This premise is only so-so and the writing style doesn't make up for it. In particular, the metaphoric language is often just ridiculous – for example, “The surf is so picturesque today – 2 percent-skim foam waves are frothing against wheat-toast sand.” Cringe. The author is whiny and self-absorbed, coming across as a petulant teenager despite being 40. He (and to some extent his father) remind me of the characters in the television series Seinfeld - not the best pick of the bunch themselves but seemingly incapable of accepting other people, instead favoring nitpicking to find things wrong with their potential girlfriends and boyfriends. The book is marketed as being funny, but mostly I found the author to be too superficial for me to care about his so-called witty opinions. However, the book did on some level raise some big questions about the nature of parent-child relationships so I appreciated that. Also, the book is a light read, quite easily finished in a few sittings. Overall, however, I wouldn't go out of my way to recommend it.read more
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Reviews

After a long and debilitating disease takes Ethel Morris' life, her husband Joe, at 80 years old, is eager to date again only a few months later. He enlists his son Bob, this book's author, to help him by calling personals for him and listening to his dating trials. Meanwhile, Bob is having dating woes of his own. (And don’t be followed by the book’s subtitle – the only thing that resembles a double date in this book comes in the last 20 pages.) This premise is only so-so and the writing style doesn't make up for it. In particular, the metaphoric language is often just ridiculous – for example, “The surf is so picturesque today – 2 percent-skim foam waves are frothing against wheat-toast sand.” Cringe. The author is whiny and self-absorbed, coming across as a petulant teenager despite being 40. He (and to some extent his father) remind me of the characters in the television series Seinfeld - not the best pick of the bunch themselves but seemingly incapable of accepting other people, instead favoring nitpicking to find things wrong with their potential girlfriends and boyfriends. The book is marketed as being funny, but mostly I found the author to be too superficial for me to care about his so-called witty opinions. However, the book did on some level raise some big questions about the nature of parent-child relationships so I appreciated that. Also, the book is a light read, quite easily finished in a few sittings. Overall, however, I wouldn't go out of my way to recommend it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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