Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Palmer LaRue is running out of birthdays. For as long as he can remember, he's dreaded the day he turns ten -- the day he'll take his place beside all the other ten-year-old boys in town, the day he'll be a wringer. But Palmer doesn't want to be a wringer. It's one of the first things he learned about himself and it's one of the biggest things he has to hide. In Palmer's town being a wringer is an honor, a tradition passed down from father to son. Palmer can't stop himself from being a wringer just like he can't stop himself from growing one year older, just like he can't stand up to a whole town -- right? Newbery Medal winner Jerry Spinelli's most powerful novel yet is a gripping tale of how one boy learns how not to be afraid.

Topics: Animals, Peer Pressure, Bullying, Coming of Age, Courage, Friendship, Birds, Realistic, Suspenseful, Psychological, Third Person Narration, Small Town, Pennsylvania, and Based on a True Story

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061757525
List price: $8.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Wringer
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Brilliant! One of the best children's novels ever.more
This is a very powerful book for both adults and children. It is a tremendous piece of children's literature.more
This is an endearing story of a boy who learns to stand up for himself. There were moments of compassion and moments of torment, both depicted with clarity and a true understanding of childhood. I loved the characterization of both male and female characters, as well as parent and child.more
Although this book is obviously created by a great author (great descriptions of situations), the plot is strange. But the way the author puts you in the same kind of situation 9 and 10 year old boys are in and explains the emotions so in depth that you feel the same, you can't help but enjoy the content even if the story is pretty unique.more
This book tells the story of Palmer, a boy who must decide to succumb to peer pressure or stand up for what he believes in. I'm pretty sure I read this book in elementary school, but I think the ideas could also translate to high school. What high schooler hasn't felt peer pressure? There could be many discussions about peer pressure in general and what to do when it happens. I think it would be a good conversation starter, even if we weren't necessarily talking about the details of the book.more
This novel is about a boy who is dreading his 10th Birthday. In the town where he grew up, boys become wringers on their 10th Birthday. Wringers are boys who break the neck of wounded pigeons. These pigeons are wounded on Pigeon Day when people pay money to shoot at these birds. Palmer wanted to be different and fought with his inner feelings about acceptance or individuality. He really doesn't want to become a wringer when he saves a pigeon and it becomes his pet.I think this book is a good book to explain that it is okay to be different and to always follow what you believe in. Its nice to have friends but true friends will not make you conform. Bullies are always a problem for school-aged children so this would be perfect to read.I would start a discussion with my classroom and tell them that it is okay to do what you believe in. As long as they are not breaking the rules or get in trouble. On the brighter side, I would start another discussion to see if any of my students have ever had a pet they loved dearly.more
This 1998 Newbery honor book is powerful, poignant and hauntingly beautiful. This is a remarkable story of peer and social pressure, the courage to sort through the quagmire of self doubt until the mud clears and what remains is a crystal clear reflection of self acceptance.Sensitive, animal loving nine year old Palmer LaRue passionately dreads the arrival of his tenth birthday. The rite of passage in his small town is to become a wringer -- a wringer of the necks of pigeons still alive after being shot at by the local townsmen. The annual pigeon day is a huge event and Palmer has a decision to make -- should he become a "man," or should he stand alone and say no.Wanting desperately to belong, Palmer abandons his long-term friendship of a neighborhood girl and initially finds a sense of belonging by becoming a member of the in crowd of male bullies where the rite of acceptance is a birthday brutal punch in the arm for every year. Like a medal of honor, Palmer proudly displays his horrific bruises obtained at the hands of a much larger, older boy.Soon, Palmer realizes that he is uncomfortable with both the peers who emotionally and physically harm and the townspeople who once a year maim and kill 5,000 helpless birds.Spinelli does a masterful job of weaving various emotions swirling inside Palmer, especially as Palmer discovers a pigeon on his windowsill and develops a loving relationship with the animal.Returning to his neighborhood friend, he accepts the softer side of himself and once again embraces his friend Dorothy as together they feed and love the animal at the risk of discovery by the bullies and the townspeople.Parker's mother and father are portrayed in a loving way, and his mother in particular shines like a beacon.This book was particularly powerful because of the way the author used the softness of animals and females to guide Parker in his realization that while it is hard to risk non acceptance, it is harder still to say no to what is good, pure and right.Highly recommended. Five Stars!!!more
Palmer is not looking forward to his 10th birthday. In his town, when boys are 10 years old they become "wringers," the boys who wring the necks of wounded pigeons at the annual Pigeon Day shoot. He is squemish at the thought of killing a wounded pigeon in the first place, but after he rescues a stray one and keeps it as a pet, he doesn't know what to do. Should he bow to peer pressure or stand up for what he believes is right?The whole concept of this book just seemed kind of icky to me. I'm not a fan of Lord of the Flies, either. I much preferred Stargirl and its sequel, Love Stargirl.more
I would classify this as realistic fiction. It is about a society that could exist, in which their sport is shooting pigeons on a festival day. I don’t know of any society like this in real life, but the concept is not completely unbelievable and the characters are relatable. Students will be able to relate to feeling lonely and being bullied and wanting to be accepted in their culture.Age Appropriateness: MiddleMedia: N/Amore
Palmer LaRue is supposed to become a pigeon wringer when he turns ten like every other boy in his town, but when a pigeon shows up at his bedroom window, he changes how things work in his town. Palmer is very easy for young people to associate with, as he gets picked on a lot and is unsure of his future. The setting is not determined, which makes it more applicable to the average youth. The theme is to not be afraid of being different, and you can control your future. Spinelli's style is accurate to the situation and the readers. I would include this in my collection.more
The book left me hanging and left a precious moral- to always follow your dream and have faith. Spenelli is not only a writer, he's a writer with a heart, like his characters.more
This troubling story about meanness, peer pressure and living up to others' expectations might be well-received by many boys. I, myself, did not like it that much. Poor pigeons!more
The portrayal of bullying in this story rang true for me - it reminded me of the gangs of girls that plagued my schoolyard. But there was a vague air of unreality about the story - possibly because my rose-coloured eyeballs had trouble imagining a town that would so actively support the violence of the pigeon shooting day.more
Awesome book...it has many interesting details. It's scary at some points, but sometimes it's funny. I like how the boy stands up for what he believes in. I don't really think that the picture on the cover explains what the story would be about. At first, I thought it was a horror story, but it wasn't.more
Read all 20 reviews

Reviews

Brilliant! One of the best children's novels ever.more
This is a very powerful book for both adults and children. It is a tremendous piece of children's literature.more
This is an endearing story of a boy who learns to stand up for himself. There were moments of compassion and moments of torment, both depicted with clarity and a true understanding of childhood. I loved the characterization of both male and female characters, as well as parent and child.more
Although this book is obviously created by a great author (great descriptions of situations), the plot is strange. But the way the author puts you in the same kind of situation 9 and 10 year old boys are in and explains the emotions so in depth that you feel the same, you can't help but enjoy the content even if the story is pretty unique.more
This book tells the story of Palmer, a boy who must decide to succumb to peer pressure or stand up for what he believes in. I'm pretty sure I read this book in elementary school, but I think the ideas could also translate to high school. What high schooler hasn't felt peer pressure? There could be many discussions about peer pressure in general and what to do when it happens. I think it would be a good conversation starter, even if we weren't necessarily talking about the details of the book.more
This novel is about a boy who is dreading his 10th Birthday. In the town where he grew up, boys become wringers on their 10th Birthday. Wringers are boys who break the neck of wounded pigeons. These pigeons are wounded on Pigeon Day when people pay money to shoot at these birds. Palmer wanted to be different and fought with his inner feelings about acceptance or individuality. He really doesn't want to become a wringer when he saves a pigeon and it becomes his pet.I think this book is a good book to explain that it is okay to be different and to always follow what you believe in. Its nice to have friends but true friends will not make you conform. Bullies are always a problem for school-aged children so this would be perfect to read.I would start a discussion with my classroom and tell them that it is okay to do what you believe in. As long as they are not breaking the rules or get in trouble. On the brighter side, I would start another discussion to see if any of my students have ever had a pet they loved dearly.more
This 1998 Newbery honor book is powerful, poignant and hauntingly beautiful. This is a remarkable story of peer and social pressure, the courage to sort through the quagmire of self doubt until the mud clears and what remains is a crystal clear reflection of self acceptance.Sensitive, animal loving nine year old Palmer LaRue passionately dreads the arrival of his tenth birthday. The rite of passage in his small town is to become a wringer -- a wringer of the necks of pigeons still alive after being shot at by the local townsmen. The annual pigeon day is a huge event and Palmer has a decision to make -- should he become a "man," or should he stand alone and say no.Wanting desperately to belong, Palmer abandons his long-term friendship of a neighborhood girl and initially finds a sense of belonging by becoming a member of the in crowd of male bullies where the rite of acceptance is a birthday brutal punch in the arm for every year. Like a medal of honor, Palmer proudly displays his horrific bruises obtained at the hands of a much larger, older boy.Soon, Palmer realizes that he is uncomfortable with both the peers who emotionally and physically harm and the townspeople who once a year maim and kill 5,000 helpless birds.Spinelli does a masterful job of weaving various emotions swirling inside Palmer, especially as Palmer discovers a pigeon on his windowsill and develops a loving relationship with the animal.Returning to his neighborhood friend, he accepts the softer side of himself and once again embraces his friend Dorothy as together they feed and love the animal at the risk of discovery by the bullies and the townspeople.Parker's mother and father are portrayed in a loving way, and his mother in particular shines like a beacon.This book was particularly powerful because of the way the author used the softness of animals and females to guide Parker in his realization that while it is hard to risk non acceptance, it is harder still to say no to what is good, pure and right.Highly recommended. Five Stars!!!more
Palmer is not looking forward to his 10th birthday. In his town, when boys are 10 years old they become "wringers," the boys who wring the necks of wounded pigeons at the annual Pigeon Day shoot. He is squemish at the thought of killing a wounded pigeon in the first place, but after he rescues a stray one and keeps it as a pet, he doesn't know what to do. Should he bow to peer pressure or stand up for what he believes is right?The whole concept of this book just seemed kind of icky to me. I'm not a fan of Lord of the Flies, either. I much preferred Stargirl and its sequel, Love Stargirl.more
I would classify this as realistic fiction. It is about a society that could exist, in which their sport is shooting pigeons on a festival day. I don’t know of any society like this in real life, but the concept is not completely unbelievable and the characters are relatable. Students will be able to relate to feeling lonely and being bullied and wanting to be accepted in their culture.Age Appropriateness: MiddleMedia: N/Amore
Palmer LaRue is supposed to become a pigeon wringer when he turns ten like every other boy in his town, but when a pigeon shows up at his bedroom window, he changes how things work in his town. Palmer is very easy for young people to associate with, as he gets picked on a lot and is unsure of his future. The setting is not determined, which makes it more applicable to the average youth. The theme is to not be afraid of being different, and you can control your future. Spinelli's style is accurate to the situation and the readers. I would include this in my collection.more
The book left me hanging and left a precious moral- to always follow your dream and have faith. Spenelli is not only a writer, he's a writer with a heart, like his characters.more
This troubling story about meanness, peer pressure and living up to others' expectations might be well-received by many boys. I, myself, did not like it that much. Poor pigeons!more
The portrayal of bullying in this story rang true for me - it reminded me of the gangs of girls that plagued my schoolyard. But there was a vague air of unreality about the story - possibly because my rose-coloured eyeballs had trouble imagining a town that would so actively support the violence of the pigeon shooting day.more
Awesome book...it has many interesting details. It's scary at some points, but sometimes it's funny. I like how the boy stands up for what he believes in. I don't really think that the picture on the cover explains what the story would be about. At first, I thought it was a horror story, but it wasn't.more
Load more
scribd