Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
Sheila Webb, typist-for-hire, has arrived at 19 Wilbraham Crescent in the seaside town of Crowdean to accept a new job. What she finds is a well-dressed corpse surrounded by five clocks. Mrs. Pebmarsh, the blind owner of No. 19, denies all knowledge of ringing Sheila's secretarial agency and asking for her by name -- yet someone did. Nor does she own that many clocks. And neither woman seems to know the victim. Colin Lamb, a young intelligence specialist working a case of his own at the nearby naval yard, happens to be on the scene at the time of Sheila Webb's ghastly discovery. Lamb knows of only one man who can properly investigate a crime as bizarre and baffling as what happened inside No. 19 -- his friend and mentor, Hercule Poirot.

Topics: England, 1960s, Series, Suspenseful, Multiple Perspectives, Murder, Blindness, Spies, Private Investigators, Cold War, Crime, 20th Century, Female Author, British Author, Small Town, and Love

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061740503
List price: $9.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Clocks
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
A young stenographer finds a body in the home of a blind woman in a room with four extra clocks set to 4:13. Things get more interesting when it turns out that the blind woman did not hire the stenographer, no one knows who the dead man is, and more murders are committed. The town’s Detective investigates the case with the help of his friend, a British secret agent, who just so happens to be chummy with Hercule Poirot. Even though this is one of the Hercule Poirot mysteries, he plays a minor role, appearing in only three scenes as an armchair detective. I thought I had the case solved and was growing frustrated by the lapses of the police and secret agent, but I was humbled when the all-knowing Poirot revealed the more complex solution. One thing that detracted from the book was the side case that the secret agent was pursuing, his hunt for Communists. This concern has always been baffling to me, so I can’t take it seriously. But I suppose it was part of the times and necessary to bring his character, and therefore Poirot, into the fold.more
A light, pleasurable read - not enough Poirot, however!more
i remember a few years back, i made a conscious decision not to read agatha christie books the way i eat pop corn...they are that special to me, and i was afraid of running out of christie books before my appetite is satisfied.just finished 'clocks', and i'm so glad that it has lived up to my memories of a proper christie novella :)an unidentified man is found dead in a blind lady's sitting room by typist-for-hire Sheila Webb. The blind lady, Mrs. Pebmarsh, denies knowing the dead guy. in fact, she denies knowing Sheila Webb, and even denies hiring a typist at all. and just to make things a bit more interesting, six different clocks were found in the same room as the dead guy, and four of them points to the wrong time!someone connected to the investigation decides to bring the case to his retired friend far away in london, hercule poirot, who has always boasted that "it was perfectly possible to lie back in one's chair, just think about it all, and come up with the answer."upon first hearing the details of the case, poirot declares matter of factly, "One thing is certain. It must be a very simple crime." red herrings galore! vintage christie! :Dmore
I've been a Christie fan since 8th grade and have read them all so many times that I always remember whodunit. Nevertheless, I find them a relaxing and enjoyable read when I'm taking a break from more weighty fiction. This offering is not one of my favorites, mostly because Hercules Poirot, though he makes an appearance, is not central to the story which focuses instead on a young friend of his who finds himself pulled into a murder mystery when he is investigating a case of espionage. The mystery itself is quite enjoyable and the solution satisfying as always; I just prefer to snuggle in with Poirot or Miss Marple when I have the chance. 4 stars.more
Good book as most of Christie's are. This is a little quick at the ending as she tries to finish the book - I would have preferred more story vs. the quick ending. The title does play a roll but I got more out of the characters which are developed well.more
This was another entry in my cool down with AC summer reading challenge. I read this ahead of viewing the Masterpiece Movie which aired last Sunday. The set up was very much like Three Act Tragedy, my least favorite AC read so far. Hercule Poirot was again a peripheral character who was in the novel very little. He just show up in the end to call everyone stupid and solve the mystery. Also like Three Act, this story had a lot of characters to keep track of and a quick solution to the mystery. It was actually two mysteries and like the AC mysteries I've read before, everything is summed up on the last two to three pages. This book is slightly better for me than Three Act just because I liked the characters better. The mystery certainly starts off intriguing enough, how did a dead man come to be found on a blind woman's floor with four clocks in a room that had never been there before? I did not figure out the solution but this wasn't one of the books that kept me on the edge of my seat. There were also references to communism that was an important issue in Chrisite's time but are out of my reference field. I think all of his AC is worth a read although this did not rank in my favorites. I'll watch the movie now and see that if that clarifies things further.more
This novel begins with one of Christie's creepiest murder scenes. A young woman arrives at her employer's house to find an unidentified dead man and a room full of stopped clocks. The rest of the book is spend unraveling the mystery of the dead man's identity and his presence in the home. To complicate matters the homeowner is blind, so visual identification is impossible. Before the mystery is solved a young secretary is also murdered, likely in connection with the mystery man. I found the clues offered in this book to be far less subtle than in some of Christie's other mysteries. Indeed, the list of characters at the book's outset gives away a great deal. Ultimately I found the solution to the mystery to be rather odd. Suffice to say that it is very much a product of its time. This is not one of Christie's more haunting efforts, but the reading of it was entertaining nonetheless.more
Late Poirot (1963 not between the wars as portrayed in the TV adaptation), a little ridiculous but still entertaining! Plot doesn't bear too close an inspection, with two intersecting strands only sorted out by the use of the little grey cells... - all the same I enjoyed it!more
Back in 2007 David Suchet had spoken of wanting to complete the filming of all of the Poirot stories by 2011, in which he will have turned 65. In February 2009 it was announced that another series of four stories has been commissioned by ITV. The four novels comprise "The Clocks," "Three Act Tragedy," "Hallowe'en Party," and "Murder on the Orient Express".I can't help but think what a rather "Poirotless" film "The Clocks" would be. It was not until page 112, Chapter 14 that Poirot first made entrance into "The Clocks". I can't help but think of Agatha Christie's feelings towards the little Belgian, viz. By 1930, Christie found Poirot 'insufferable', by 1960, she felt that he was a 'detestable, bombastic, tiresome, ego-centric little creep'. Yet Christie claimed that it was her duty to produce what the public liked, and what the public liked was Poirot.I should hope that I would never feel as a writer, come to despise my creation (hmm...). I can only imagine what she would have created if she killed Poirot off and pursued writing of which her heart was in. It was nice of Christie to include Poirot at the end of this story again, to give us the mystery solved. I very much would like to visit the quaint Wilbraham Crescent one day (which backed in onto itself), though not to visit a blind communists such as Miss Pebmarsh, nor crazy cat ladies such as Mrs. Hemmings, and certainly not to visit Sheila Webb, as I absolutely despise her stupid lying face. I can only agree with Detective Inspector Dick Hardcastle in his opinion of Colin Lamb and his marriage—the man has lost his marbles.Wheels within wheels within the Crescent that backs in on itself. That's what made this mystery worthwhile, as well as the short but sweet appearance of Hercule Poirot. Also, I am a fan of clocks, which are made up of wheels within wheels; and I very much enjoyed Poirot's further elucidating us on the appearance of such clocks, as well as his encyclopedic knowledge of crime fiction. Unfortunately Hastings was in South America, I believe it was.more
The Clocks is OK, but not one of her best. There are too many characters involved and the plot goes round in circles. Poirot barely appears, not doing any direct investigating or interviewing, which makes his deduction process less interesting. However there are a few genuine surprises and likeable narrators that redeem it.more
This has quite a convoluted plot, almost as convoluted as the layout of Wilbraham Crescent which backs onto itself - 19 Wilbraham Crescent is where the murder takes place. Poirot makes a late appearance and solves the mystery. Not one of my favourite Christies, but not a bad read either.more
Hercule Poirot made a surprise appearance.Brilliantmore
Clocks was a bit of a twisty one, every time you turned around the finger happened to be pointing to someone who you didn't want to be guilty. There just 'happened' to be quite a few coincidences in a sleepy little neighborhood, but other than that it was a good read and a good whodunit. I wouldn't go so far as to say it was one of her best, far from it. If your new to Christie I would suggest starting off with a different one.more
This Agatha Christie mystery is branded as a Hercule Poirot novel but that's a little misleading. Poirot doesn't make an appearance until almost halfway through, and once he does, he's in more of a supporting role. Agent Colin Lamb is the narrator here and he is aided chiefly by Inspector Hardcastle, and somewhat lesser by Poirot himself.The plot is well thought out and intriguing, and I expect that from Agatha Christie, but the lack of appearances by Poirot made it less enjoyable. Listening to Poirot figure out the crime and ultimately walking us through his thought process just barely made the whole effort worth it for me. more
Read all 14 reviews

Reviews

A young stenographer finds a body in the home of a blind woman in a room with four extra clocks set to 4:13. Things get more interesting when it turns out that the blind woman did not hire the stenographer, no one knows who the dead man is, and more murders are committed. The town’s Detective investigates the case with the help of his friend, a British secret agent, who just so happens to be chummy with Hercule Poirot. Even though this is one of the Hercule Poirot mysteries, he plays a minor role, appearing in only three scenes as an armchair detective. I thought I had the case solved and was growing frustrated by the lapses of the police and secret agent, but I was humbled when the all-knowing Poirot revealed the more complex solution. One thing that detracted from the book was the side case that the secret agent was pursuing, his hunt for Communists. This concern has always been baffling to me, so I can’t take it seriously. But I suppose it was part of the times and necessary to bring his character, and therefore Poirot, into the fold.more
A light, pleasurable read - not enough Poirot, however!more
i remember a few years back, i made a conscious decision not to read agatha christie books the way i eat pop corn...they are that special to me, and i was afraid of running out of christie books before my appetite is satisfied.just finished 'clocks', and i'm so glad that it has lived up to my memories of a proper christie novella :)an unidentified man is found dead in a blind lady's sitting room by typist-for-hire Sheila Webb. The blind lady, Mrs. Pebmarsh, denies knowing the dead guy. in fact, she denies knowing Sheila Webb, and even denies hiring a typist at all. and just to make things a bit more interesting, six different clocks were found in the same room as the dead guy, and four of them points to the wrong time!someone connected to the investigation decides to bring the case to his retired friend far away in london, hercule poirot, who has always boasted that "it was perfectly possible to lie back in one's chair, just think about it all, and come up with the answer."upon first hearing the details of the case, poirot declares matter of factly, "One thing is certain. It must be a very simple crime." red herrings galore! vintage christie! :Dmore
I've been a Christie fan since 8th grade and have read them all so many times that I always remember whodunit. Nevertheless, I find them a relaxing and enjoyable read when I'm taking a break from more weighty fiction. This offering is not one of my favorites, mostly because Hercules Poirot, though he makes an appearance, is not central to the story which focuses instead on a young friend of his who finds himself pulled into a murder mystery when he is investigating a case of espionage. The mystery itself is quite enjoyable and the solution satisfying as always; I just prefer to snuggle in with Poirot or Miss Marple when I have the chance. 4 stars.more
Good book as most of Christie's are. This is a little quick at the ending as she tries to finish the book - I would have preferred more story vs. the quick ending. The title does play a roll but I got more out of the characters which are developed well.more
This was another entry in my cool down with AC summer reading challenge. I read this ahead of viewing the Masterpiece Movie which aired last Sunday. The set up was very much like Three Act Tragedy, my least favorite AC read so far. Hercule Poirot was again a peripheral character who was in the novel very little. He just show up in the end to call everyone stupid and solve the mystery. Also like Three Act, this story had a lot of characters to keep track of and a quick solution to the mystery. It was actually two mysteries and like the AC mysteries I've read before, everything is summed up on the last two to three pages. This book is slightly better for me than Three Act just because I liked the characters better. The mystery certainly starts off intriguing enough, how did a dead man come to be found on a blind woman's floor with four clocks in a room that had never been there before? I did not figure out the solution but this wasn't one of the books that kept me on the edge of my seat. There were also references to communism that was an important issue in Chrisite's time but are out of my reference field. I think all of his AC is worth a read although this did not rank in my favorites. I'll watch the movie now and see that if that clarifies things further.more
This novel begins with one of Christie's creepiest murder scenes. A young woman arrives at her employer's house to find an unidentified dead man and a room full of stopped clocks. The rest of the book is spend unraveling the mystery of the dead man's identity and his presence in the home. To complicate matters the homeowner is blind, so visual identification is impossible. Before the mystery is solved a young secretary is also murdered, likely in connection with the mystery man. I found the clues offered in this book to be far less subtle than in some of Christie's other mysteries. Indeed, the list of characters at the book's outset gives away a great deal. Ultimately I found the solution to the mystery to be rather odd. Suffice to say that it is very much a product of its time. This is not one of Christie's more haunting efforts, but the reading of it was entertaining nonetheless.more
Late Poirot (1963 not between the wars as portrayed in the TV adaptation), a little ridiculous but still entertaining! Plot doesn't bear too close an inspection, with two intersecting strands only sorted out by the use of the little grey cells... - all the same I enjoyed it!more
Back in 2007 David Suchet had spoken of wanting to complete the filming of all of the Poirot stories by 2011, in which he will have turned 65. In February 2009 it was announced that another series of four stories has been commissioned by ITV. The four novels comprise "The Clocks," "Three Act Tragedy," "Hallowe'en Party," and "Murder on the Orient Express".I can't help but think what a rather "Poirotless" film "The Clocks" would be. It was not until page 112, Chapter 14 that Poirot first made entrance into "The Clocks". I can't help but think of Agatha Christie's feelings towards the little Belgian, viz. By 1930, Christie found Poirot 'insufferable', by 1960, she felt that he was a 'detestable, bombastic, tiresome, ego-centric little creep'. Yet Christie claimed that it was her duty to produce what the public liked, and what the public liked was Poirot.I should hope that I would never feel as a writer, come to despise my creation (hmm...). I can only imagine what she would have created if she killed Poirot off and pursued writing of which her heart was in. It was nice of Christie to include Poirot at the end of this story again, to give us the mystery solved. I very much would like to visit the quaint Wilbraham Crescent one day (which backed in onto itself), though not to visit a blind communists such as Miss Pebmarsh, nor crazy cat ladies such as Mrs. Hemmings, and certainly not to visit Sheila Webb, as I absolutely despise her stupid lying face. I can only agree with Detective Inspector Dick Hardcastle in his opinion of Colin Lamb and his marriage—the man has lost his marbles.Wheels within wheels within the Crescent that backs in on itself. That's what made this mystery worthwhile, as well as the short but sweet appearance of Hercule Poirot. Also, I am a fan of clocks, which are made up of wheels within wheels; and I very much enjoyed Poirot's further elucidating us on the appearance of such clocks, as well as his encyclopedic knowledge of crime fiction. Unfortunately Hastings was in South America, I believe it was.more
The Clocks is OK, but not one of her best. There are too many characters involved and the plot goes round in circles. Poirot barely appears, not doing any direct investigating or interviewing, which makes his deduction process less interesting. However there are a few genuine surprises and likeable narrators that redeem it.more
This has quite a convoluted plot, almost as convoluted as the layout of Wilbraham Crescent which backs onto itself - 19 Wilbraham Crescent is where the murder takes place. Poirot makes a late appearance and solves the mystery. Not one of my favourite Christies, but not a bad read either.more
Hercule Poirot made a surprise appearance.Brilliantmore
Clocks was a bit of a twisty one, every time you turned around the finger happened to be pointing to someone who you didn't want to be guilty. There just 'happened' to be quite a few coincidences in a sleepy little neighborhood, but other than that it was a good read and a good whodunit. I wouldn't go so far as to say it was one of her best, far from it. If your new to Christie I would suggest starting off with a different one.more
This Agatha Christie mystery is branded as a Hercule Poirot novel but that's a little misleading. Poirot doesn't make an appearance until almost halfway through, and once he does, he's in more of a supporting role. Agent Colin Lamb is the narrator here and he is aided chiefly by Inspector Hardcastle, and somewhat lesser by Poirot himself.The plot is well thought out and intriguing, and I expect that from Agatha Christie, but the lack of appearances by Poirot made it less enjoyable. Listening to Poirot figure out the crime and ultimately walking us through his thought process just barely made the whole effort worth it for me. more
Load more
scribd