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Harry March is something of a wreck and more than half nuts. Up until now, he has lived peacefully on an island in the Hamptons with his talking dog, Hector, a born-again Evangelical and unapologetic capitalist. But March’s life starts to completely unravel when Lapham—an ostentatious multimillionaire who made his fortune on asparagus tongs—begins construction of a gargantuan mansion just across the way. To Harry, Lapham’s monstrosity-to-be represents the fetid and corrupt excess that has ruined modern civilization. Which means, quite simply, that this is war.

Topics: Suburbia

Published: HarperCollins on Nov 17, 2009
ISBN: 9780061986901
List price: $10.39
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This novel is about an eccentric writer, Harry March, who lives on an island in the Hamptons. He is plagued by the building of a huge mansion on a neighboring island by a man named Silas Lapham. None of the characters are likeable; Lapham represents excess in everything and March is lonely as a result of his own crabbiness and intentional eccentricity. March wants to take down Lapham's house with a device he calls the "Da Vinci," but of course things don't work out like he plans. This could be funny, but it's too heavy-handed and clunky, and the satire of the rich Hamptonites is too obvious. March's dog talks to him, I suppose because otherwise the book would just be March's thoughts because he doesn't interact in any substantive way with anyone else. Again, a talking dog could be clever and funny, but it didn't work here.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I found this book hilarious. The best thing was the depiction of the main character Harry March. I share some of Harry's worldview, but could also laugh at some of his obvious insanity. Topical, intelligent, and laugh-out-loudread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Reviews

This novel is about an eccentric writer, Harry March, who lives on an island in the Hamptons. He is plagued by the building of a huge mansion on a neighboring island by a man named Silas Lapham. None of the characters are likeable; Lapham represents excess in everything and March is lonely as a result of his own crabbiness and intentional eccentricity. March wants to take down Lapham's house with a device he calls the "Da Vinci," but of course things don't work out like he plans. This could be funny, but it's too heavy-handed and clunky, and the satire of the rich Hamptonites is too obvious. March's dog talks to him, I suppose because otherwise the book would just be March's thoughts because he doesn't interact in any substantive way with anyone else. Again, a talking dog could be clever and funny, but it didn't work here.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I found this book hilarious. The best thing was the depiction of the main character Harry March. I share some of Harry's worldview, but could also laugh at some of his obvious insanity. Topical, intelligent, and laugh-out-loud
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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