From the Publisher

It's a tough life for witch Rachel Morgan, sexy, independent bounty hunter, prowling the darkest shadows of downtown Cincinnati for criminal creatures of the night.

She can handle the leather-clad vamps and even tangle with a cunning demon or two. But a serial killer who feeds on the experts in the most dangerous kind of black magic is definitely pressing the limits.

Confronting an ancient, implacable evil is more than just child's play -- and this time, Rachel will be lucky to escape with her very soul.

Topics: Witches, Urban, Series, Demons, Vampires, Bounty Hunters, Serial Killers, Murder, Magic, Vampire Hunters, Magical Creatures, Werewolves, Female Protagonist, Magical Curses, Adventurous, Suspenseful, First Person Narration, Female Author, and American Author

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061744518
List price: $6.99
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