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In the Nevada desert, an experiment has gone horribly wrong. A cloud of nanoparticles—micro-robots—has escaped from the laboratory. This cloud is self-sustaining and self-reproducing. It is intelligent and learns from experience. For all practical purposes, it is alive.

It has been programmed as a predator. It is evolving swiftly, becoming more deadly with each passing hour.

Every attempt to destroy it has failed.

And we are the prey.

Topics: Apocalypse, Nevada, Desert, Speculative Fiction, Exciting, Futuristic, Genetic Engineering, First Person Narration, Robots, Biotechnology, Computer Programming, Ethics, Survival, Family, and Genetics

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061750236
List price: $9.99
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Chrichton keeps a flow of suspense in his writings that in one page may heighten your need to know more and, at the next page, you just want to get to the end to see how it finishes (which I have never done, that is, read the ending of a book before I finished it). He also involves you in the somewhat technical details of the science his book revolves around without at the least being tedious. The way he gives you the information just accelerates the suspense. "Prey" is no different. While a company attempts to design a tiny robotic camera for the defense department using nano-technology, it goes terribly wrong and micro-robots escape the confines of the laboratory and begin evolving with an intelligence all their own with deadly consequences.I should mention that a few times - not many - Chrichton resorts to profane language, which is totally unnecessary. I am surprised as I haven't noticed it in previous books I've read by him (although it has been awhile since I picked up a Chrichton book to read). If you can forgive him for that, I'm sure you will enjoy the read.more
A tad bit predictable, but very good nonetheless. Very typical "Crichton".more
Thrilling! The story was different than normal sci-fi. It felt real. more
I thought it was so cool to be able to say "Oh I'm just doing some recommended reading for my CS class" when reading this sort of book. Yes, it's recommended reading for a class on Evolutionary Computation. The book itself wasn't amazing.. the writing was a little weird in places, almost as if he had the beginning and the end written and he was struggling to fill in the middle. But definitely an entertaining read for me, given my recent entry into the field of phage evolution. Is the science sound? Well.. he's got a nice reading list at the end of the book. That's about where the science ends. The rest I felt was just cool, science-y name dropping. Worth a read though :)more
I read Crichton’s novel for two reasons: 1) because I usually learn something from him about a new subject that interest me, like nanotechnology; and 2) because they’re usually very suspenseful, exciting, quick reads. In this case, I did learn something new – but not as much as I would have liked – about nanotechnology and molecular engineering, the scientific areas that the technological horror story explores.But the truth is that, this time, the plot was more than a little silly, the characters were bare sketches of typical Crichton people – none of whom I cared a lick about – and the suspense was almost entirely missing. Yes, it was a quick read, but a thoroughly unsatisfying one. Perhaps Crichton isn’t trying anymore, or perhaps I’ve outgrown him; I suspect it’s a combination of both. But while Jurassic Park may be counted as a guilty pleasure, this novel gives no pleasure at all.more
Another Mic Crichton's fantastic novel...He is a master story teller,,,more
* spoiler alert ** I liked this book, it was scary with how tiny the little computer bugs were. They could get almost anywhere and then they acted like a group and could destroy anything they wanted. The end with the magnets and the wife, broke my heart. The story with the family kept my interest. It was sad the way that things change, but I'm glad at the end things were discussed between the husband and wife. The idea of the nano's is great, but control of them will be something I hope we get before we set them loose. This may be make believe, but the future is coming. Exciting and frightening at the same timemore
This book is among the best thriller books I have ever read. It is scary and at the same time full of suspense. You simply cannot put it down. The ability to create a bridge between fiction and non-fiction is something few authors could do and in this case Michael Crichton is a master.more
Jack Forman has big problems. The out-of-work computer programmer turned stay-at-home dad suspects that his wife is having an affair. Little does he know that this is the least of his problems. His wife Julia has been working long hours with a new technology – nanotechnology – creating tiny robots the size of an atom. But something has gone horribly awry. The nanobots have escaped, and based on a computer program that Jack wrote, they have also begun to reproduce, evolve, swarm, and hunt. Humans are their prey. Crichton’s most suspenseful novel yet , Prey, will leave you in a constant state of anticipation, eagerly turning the page to see what happens next.more
Prey is a techno-thriller where Michael Crichton takes us deep into the world of nanotechnology. In this science space, millions of nanoparticles act as a swarm to achieve a common goal. However, what happens when the swarm evolves faster than the humans that design it? Crichton has authored a suspenseful story in which nanomachines are used to develop innovative medical diagnostic images by essentially creating a nano-eye that can traverse the blood stream, but all is not as it seems as the true reason for the technology comes to light.Michael Crichton spends a great deal of time on the scientific details of nanotechnology and distributed computer processing, which are essential in understanding the plot. Each nanoparticle is given a very simple program to run and a very small brain (CPU/Memory) to achieve its objective. As more and more particles are introduced into the system each particle communicates with nearby particles, in essence increasing the brain power of the machine. Crichton takes this a step further by allowing the swarm to learn and evolve at a rate much higher than expected. The result: Prey. A fun and suspenseful read.more
Prey starts off like a typical Crichton book. High concept, with one-dimensional and unbelievable characters, way too much space devoted to describing technical details. Sadly, the pacing dies down in the middle and the last hundred and fifty pages are spent slogging towards the end.more
This started out excellent, I raced through the first couple of hundred pages, and pretty much decided I'd go on to read all his books if they were this good.Unfortunately this book is a bit like one of those suitcases in spy films which have a false bottom. After a sort of mini conclusion four hundred pages in, it then limps along for angnother hundred pages and blows itself out like an overambitious firework.All in all, this read like a Stephen King plot (very much like 'Cell' in fact), but whereas King would have spent ages building up personality, Crichton spends an equivalent amount of time describing the technology in excruciating detail. I think I prefer King's style - he can (and does) get away with simply saying OK there's this killer virus out there, or whatever it happens to be, and then describing the consequences. I have no problem believing that it exists. Michael Crichton seems to think we have to hear chapter and verse about the underlying technology, and I don't know about anyone else, most of it went right over my head.more
Michael Crichton would occasionally write books forewarning the general populace of new technology gone bad. For example, with Jurassic Park, it was dinosaur cloning.With Prey, the technology to fear is nanotechnology. Granted, it's mixed a bit with swarm technology, evolutionary algorithms, and genetic modification. But the root is nanotechnology: tiny little robots that can replicate themselves, and do stuff on a tiny level.The story is told through the point of view of the protagonist, an out-of-work computer programmer. He's eager to get a job before he reaches his "shelf-life."His wife, he's noticed, has been aloof with respect to the family. He fears the worse: she's having an affair. After she gets into an automobile accident, he gets a job offer from her company. He jumps right on it, part to have a job, and part to uncover the root of her mysterious behavior.So, at the lab, in the middle of the desert, he learns that a rogue swarm built for the DOD has escaped and is replicating in the desert. The odd thing is, though, nobody seems to want to take care of it.The book is a thriller, so there are plenty of twists, turns, explosions, and deaths at the hands of these fearful micro-automata. And in the end we learn a valuable lesson: stop messing with nature!The book itself was quite entertaining. Crichton was one of those authors with "universal appeal" that actually appeals to me. If you've liked other Crichton books about technology, you'll most likely enjoy this one as well.more
This is the first book I read by Michael Crichton and it remains one of my favorite reads. Fast paced technological thriller that keeps you on edge until the very end. Despite the fact that it's been shown that the situation in this book is not actually realistic, Crichton builds a solid theoretical situation that feels completely plausible and draws you in.more
One of Crichtons best I think. The suspense was great and the depth of the field covered is enormous but he explains it all very well as usual. Great read.more
This book was awesome, very hard to put down, kept me guessing until near the end, the action was always at a good speed. And like with most of his novels, there is a lot of interesting information in there as well. My only complaint was that towards the end, i didnt really care for the direction the story took, felt kind of rushed and went a little too far imo.more
Definitely one of Crichton's weaker entries. A lot of this novel, especially the ending unfortunately, was predictable. The usual punch in the face that Crichton provides when it comes to issues of science and ethics is also missing. Beyond the obvious Nanotechnology=bad, there's no deeper argument. Readable, but not a must read.more
In the Nevada desert an experiment has gone horribly wrong. A cloud of nanoparticles -- micro-robots -- has escaped from the laboratory. This cloud is self-sustaining and self-reproducing. It is intelligent and learns from experience. For all practical purposes, it is alive. It has been programmed as a predator. It is evolving swiftly, becoming more deadly with each passing hour. Every attempt to destroy it has failed. And we are the prey.As fresh as today's headlines, Michael Crichton's most compelling novel yet tells the story of a mechanical plague and the desperate efforts of a handful of scientists to stop it. Drawing on up-to-the-minute scientific fact, 'Prey' takes us into the emerging realms of nanotechnology and artificial distributed intelligence -- in a story of breathtaking suspense. 'Prey' is a novel you can't put down. Because time is running out.more
I really enjoyed this book once I got into it. It may not be the books fault, I was in Paris for the first time. I don't know why I haven't read more Michael Crichton. I always enjoy each book.more
A mid-career, Silicon Valley couple is having marital issues. The husband lost his job for raising ethical questions, and suddenly he's the one being blackballed. His wife is working late hours every day, is becoming a stranger to her kids, and resents that her husband has not yet got back to work and accuses him of undermining her authority at home. He starts to believe she is having an affair...the signs appear unmistakable. Then he gets a phone call from his former company...they want him back as a consultant to fix something that went horribly wrong with one of his former projects. And the client happens to be his wife's company, and immediately he is dispatched to a fabrication plant in the desert where the company has seemingly overcome the problem of creating nanobots in quantity.At this point, the novel moves into the Sci-fi techno-horror realm as the nanobots escape, evolve, and learn. Creighton, as was his wont, displays a terrific grasp on the state of technology, as well as current issues and challenges employing it. There are no less than 5 pages of bibliography at the end, but Creighton keeps the science accessible (likely artificially so). It's been a long time since I've blown through a 500-page book in just two days, and even longer since finding the task so effortless. The story is recent enough that technology portrayed doesn't come off as already obsolete...a frequent problem with this type of story.more
Synopsis: Jack is now the care taker of his family after losing his job as writing computer codes. His wife works at Xymos, a lab in the Nevada desert that is developing nonoparticles - micro-machines. Jack suspects his wife Julia of having an affair. Something goes wrong at the lab and a swarm of nanoparticles escaped. The swarm is able to learn from experiences and seems to be self sustained and reproducing. Jack is called in to inspect the PREDPREY code that was used with the nanoparticles. When he gets to the lab, the team is acting secretive and the job is much more deadly than Jack suspected.Pros & Cons: The book is suspenseful, intelligent, and engaging. It seems to follow the typical Crichton formula: A big corporation does something that can be harmful to the population, an unsuspecting character has the knowledge to solve the problem and save the day while exposing the corporation, the scenarios seem like they can actually happen. Crichton is an excellent story teller, and although I enjoyed this book, I liked it less than some of his other books. The ending felt rushed and did not seem to fit with the flow of the rest of the story. Recommended for Crichton fans and those who enjoy thrillersmore
I really like the idea of something man-made and tiny threatening humanity, but there were a few things that didn't quite add up in my head. Also, it wasn't quite as scary as I think it could have been.more
Very interesting book. Story keeps moving along with ease even through the technical information. It still makes the hair on my arms stand up with a think of how easily we could screw up and threaten so many people.more
I hated this book so much. Crichton writes well, but he knows nothing about software or nanotech. However, it's his sexism which really makes this (and many of his other book) so bad. I only read it because I received it free, and now I regret reading it.more
The Michael Crichton technology play-book is pretty set. It goes like this: (a) find some type of technology that is scary, (b) have a reckless company dabble in this technology without any kind of safety protocol, and (c) have a virtuous hero who vainly warned of the potential troubles ahead of time save everyone's bacon in the end.Prey follows this script pretty closely. The scary technology is nanotechnology. The reckless corporation is Xymos. The virtuous hero is Jack Forman, and although he doesn't warn of the dangers of this technology ahead of time, he makes up for it by realizing how dangerous it is right away, even though no one else seems to be able to without his help. He is also made to seem even more virtuous because his wife works at Xymos and was the one who authorized the reckless experiments. She is also cheating on him, just in case you didn't figure out that she was a bad person.The nanotechnology story itself is fairly well-done, and the protagonist's efforts to control the rapidly evolving swarm makes for an interesting and exciting plot. However, Crichton's heavy-handed moralizing about evil corporate greed and the obviously reckless and foolish behavior of the corporate officers detracts from the impact of the book. If the story had a little less of that, it would have been a lot better. As it is, it is only a modestly entertaining diversion.more
The paperback cover quotes the New York Times Book review in part "Terrifying . . .irresistibly suspenseful." Indeed, the story Michael Crichton spins has elements of terror and at times the suspense grabs hold of the reader and does not let go.A tale of science run amuck on the tracks of greed and stupidity. Crichton mixes an old formula with new science.The finish is written as if the Crichton has a deadline to meet. Definitely, unsatisfying for a Michael Crichton read.Fortunately, for the reader, a bad Crichton book is better than most other authors seem able to generate on a good day.Reduce your expectations and the book will be satisfying.more
Prey is an extremely thrilling read about what can happen when cutting-edge science is applied by the military without regards to possible consequences. In Prey, nano-technology is utilised to create a swarm of deadly micro-robots. These robots are able to reproduce, survive on solar power and have a kind of hive-mind, allowing them to become one of the deadliest predators mankind has encountered. This is a very scary novel and I couldn't put it down. I highly recommend reading it.more
Typical Crichton novel, based upon building a thrilling story around a current scientific topic. This time it's nanotechnology and the dangers inherent therein. Educational and entertaining read.more
Read all 75 reviews

Reviews

Chrichton keeps a flow of suspense in his writings that in one page may heighten your need to know more and, at the next page, you just want to get to the end to see how it finishes (which I have never done, that is, read the ending of a book before I finished it). He also involves you in the somewhat technical details of the science his book revolves around without at the least being tedious. The way he gives you the information just accelerates the suspense. "Prey" is no different. While a company attempts to design a tiny robotic camera for the defense department using nano-technology, it goes terribly wrong and micro-robots escape the confines of the laboratory and begin evolving with an intelligence all their own with deadly consequences.I should mention that a few times - not many - Chrichton resorts to profane language, which is totally unnecessary. I am surprised as I haven't noticed it in previous books I've read by him (although it has been awhile since I picked up a Chrichton book to read). If you can forgive him for that, I'm sure you will enjoy the read.more
A tad bit predictable, but very good nonetheless. Very typical "Crichton".more
Thrilling! The story was different than normal sci-fi. It felt real. more
I thought it was so cool to be able to say "Oh I'm just doing some recommended reading for my CS class" when reading this sort of book. Yes, it's recommended reading for a class on Evolutionary Computation. The book itself wasn't amazing.. the writing was a little weird in places, almost as if he had the beginning and the end written and he was struggling to fill in the middle. But definitely an entertaining read for me, given my recent entry into the field of phage evolution. Is the science sound? Well.. he's got a nice reading list at the end of the book. That's about where the science ends. The rest I felt was just cool, science-y name dropping. Worth a read though :)more
I read Crichton’s novel for two reasons: 1) because I usually learn something from him about a new subject that interest me, like nanotechnology; and 2) because they’re usually very suspenseful, exciting, quick reads. In this case, I did learn something new – but not as much as I would have liked – about nanotechnology and molecular engineering, the scientific areas that the technological horror story explores.But the truth is that, this time, the plot was more than a little silly, the characters were bare sketches of typical Crichton people – none of whom I cared a lick about – and the suspense was almost entirely missing. Yes, it was a quick read, but a thoroughly unsatisfying one. Perhaps Crichton isn’t trying anymore, or perhaps I’ve outgrown him; I suspect it’s a combination of both. But while Jurassic Park may be counted as a guilty pleasure, this novel gives no pleasure at all.more
Another Mic Crichton's fantastic novel...He is a master story teller,,,more
* spoiler alert ** I liked this book, it was scary with how tiny the little computer bugs were. They could get almost anywhere and then they acted like a group and could destroy anything they wanted. The end with the magnets and the wife, broke my heart. The story with the family kept my interest. It was sad the way that things change, but I'm glad at the end things were discussed between the husband and wife. The idea of the nano's is great, but control of them will be something I hope we get before we set them loose. This may be make believe, but the future is coming. Exciting and frightening at the same timemore
This book is among the best thriller books I have ever read. It is scary and at the same time full of suspense. You simply cannot put it down. The ability to create a bridge between fiction and non-fiction is something few authors could do and in this case Michael Crichton is a master.more
Jack Forman has big problems. The out-of-work computer programmer turned stay-at-home dad suspects that his wife is having an affair. Little does he know that this is the least of his problems. His wife Julia has been working long hours with a new technology – nanotechnology – creating tiny robots the size of an atom. But something has gone horribly awry. The nanobots have escaped, and based on a computer program that Jack wrote, they have also begun to reproduce, evolve, swarm, and hunt. Humans are their prey. Crichton’s most suspenseful novel yet , Prey, will leave you in a constant state of anticipation, eagerly turning the page to see what happens next.more
Prey is a techno-thriller where Michael Crichton takes us deep into the world of nanotechnology. In this science space, millions of nanoparticles act as a swarm to achieve a common goal. However, what happens when the swarm evolves faster than the humans that design it? Crichton has authored a suspenseful story in which nanomachines are used to develop innovative medical diagnostic images by essentially creating a nano-eye that can traverse the blood stream, but all is not as it seems as the true reason for the technology comes to light.Michael Crichton spends a great deal of time on the scientific details of nanotechnology and distributed computer processing, which are essential in understanding the plot. Each nanoparticle is given a very simple program to run and a very small brain (CPU/Memory) to achieve its objective. As more and more particles are introduced into the system each particle communicates with nearby particles, in essence increasing the brain power of the machine. Crichton takes this a step further by allowing the swarm to learn and evolve at a rate much higher than expected. The result: Prey. A fun and suspenseful read.more
Prey starts off like a typical Crichton book. High concept, with one-dimensional and unbelievable characters, way too much space devoted to describing technical details. Sadly, the pacing dies down in the middle and the last hundred and fifty pages are spent slogging towards the end.more
This started out excellent, I raced through the first couple of hundred pages, and pretty much decided I'd go on to read all his books if they were this good.Unfortunately this book is a bit like one of those suitcases in spy films which have a false bottom. After a sort of mini conclusion four hundred pages in, it then limps along for angnother hundred pages and blows itself out like an overambitious firework.All in all, this read like a Stephen King plot (very much like 'Cell' in fact), but whereas King would have spent ages building up personality, Crichton spends an equivalent amount of time describing the technology in excruciating detail. I think I prefer King's style - he can (and does) get away with simply saying OK there's this killer virus out there, or whatever it happens to be, and then describing the consequences. I have no problem believing that it exists. Michael Crichton seems to think we have to hear chapter and verse about the underlying technology, and I don't know about anyone else, most of it went right over my head.more
Michael Crichton would occasionally write books forewarning the general populace of new technology gone bad. For example, with Jurassic Park, it was dinosaur cloning.With Prey, the technology to fear is nanotechnology. Granted, it's mixed a bit with swarm technology, evolutionary algorithms, and genetic modification. But the root is nanotechnology: tiny little robots that can replicate themselves, and do stuff on a tiny level.The story is told through the point of view of the protagonist, an out-of-work computer programmer. He's eager to get a job before he reaches his "shelf-life."His wife, he's noticed, has been aloof with respect to the family. He fears the worse: she's having an affair. After she gets into an automobile accident, he gets a job offer from her company. He jumps right on it, part to have a job, and part to uncover the root of her mysterious behavior.So, at the lab, in the middle of the desert, he learns that a rogue swarm built for the DOD has escaped and is replicating in the desert. The odd thing is, though, nobody seems to want to take care of it.The book is a thriller, so there are plenty of twists, turns, explosions, and deaths at the hands of these fearful micro-automata. And in the end we learn a valuable lesson: stop messing with nature!The book itself was quite entertaining. Crichton was one of those authors with "universal appeal" that actually appeals to me. If you've liked other Crichton books about technology, you'll most likely enjoy this one as well.more
This is the first book I read by Michael Crichton and it remains one of my favorite reads. Fast paced technological thriller that keeps you on edge until the very end. Despite the fact that it's been shown that the situation in this book is not actually realistic, Crichton builds a solid theoretical situation that feels completely plausible and draws you in.more
One of Crichtons best I think. The suspense was great and the depth of the field covered is enormous but he explains it all very well as usual. Great read.more
This book was awesome, very hard to put down, kept me guessing until near the end, the action was always at a good speed. And like with most of his novels, there is a lot of interesting information in there as well. My only complaint was that towards the end, i didnt really care for the direction the story took, felt kind of rushed and went a little too far imo.more
Definitely one of Crichton's weaker entries. A lot of this novel, especially the ending unfortunately, was predictable. The usual punch in the face that Crichton provides when it comes to issues of science and ethics is also missing. Beyond the obvious Nanotechnology=bad, there's no deeper argument. Readable, but not a must read.more
In the Nevada desert an experiment has gone horribly wrong. A cloud of nanoparticles -- micro-robots -- has escaped from the laboratory. This cloud is self-sustaining and self-reproducing. It is intelligent and learns from experience. For all practical purposes, it is alive. It has been programmed as a predator. It is evolving swiftly, becoming more deadly with each passing hour. Every attempt to destroy it has failed. And we are the prey.As fresh as today's headlines, Michael Crichton's most compelling novel yet tells the story of a mechanical plague and the desperate efforts of a handful of scientists to stop it. Drawing on up-to-the-minute scientific fact, 'Prey' takes us into the emerging realms of nanotechnology and artificial distributed intelligence -- in a story of breathtaking suspense. 'Prey' is a novel you can't put down. Because time is running out.more
I really enjoyed this book once I got into it. It may not be the books fault, I was in Paris for the first time. I don't know why I haven't read more Michael Crichton. I always enjoy each book.more
A mid-career, Silicon Valley couple is having marital issues. The husband lost his job for raising ethical questions, and suddenly he's the one being blackballed. His wife is working late hours every day, is becoming a stranger to her kids, and resents that her husband has not yet got back to work and accuses him of undermining her authority at home. He starts to believe she is having an affair...the signs appear unmistakable. Then he gets a phone call from his former company...they want him back as a consultant to fix something that went horribly wrong with one of his former projects. And the client happens to be his wife's company, and immediately he is dispatched to a fabrication plant in the desert where the company has seemingly overcome the problem of creating nanobots in quantity.At this point, the novel moves into the Sci-fi techno-horror realm as the nanobots escape, evolve, and learn. Creighton, as was his wont, displays a terrific grasp on the state of technology, as well as current issues and challenges employing it. There are no less than 5 pages of bibliography at the end, but Creighton keeps the science accessible (likely artificially so). It's been a long time since I've blown through a 500-page book in just two days, and even longer since finding the task so effortless. The story is recent enough that technology portrayed doesn't come off as already obsolete...a frequent problem with this type of story.more
Synopsis: Jack is now the care taker of his family after losing his job as writing computer codes. His wife works at Xymos, a lab in the Nevada desert that is developing nonoparticles - micro-machines. Jack suspects his wife Julia of having an affair. Something goes wrong at the lab and a swarm of nanoparticles escaped. The swarm is able to learn from experiences and seems to be self sustained and reproducing. Jack is called in to inspect the PREDPREY code that was used with the nanoparticles. When he gets to the lab, the team is acting secretive and the job is much more deadly than Jack suspected.Pros & Cons: The book is suspenseful, intelligent, and engaging. It seems to follow the typical Crichton formula: A big corporation does something that can be harmful to the population, an unsuspecting character has the knowledge to solve the problem and save the day while exposing the corporation, the scenarios seem like they can actually happen. Crichton is an excellent story teller, and although I enjoyed this book, I liked it less than some of his other books. The ending felt rushed and did not seem to fit with the flow of the rest of the story. Recommended for Crichton fans and those who enjoy thrillersmore
I really like the idea of something man-made and tiny threatening humanity, but there were a few things that didn't quite add up in my head. Also, it wasn't quite as scary as I think it could have been.more
Very interesting book. Story keeps moving along with ease even through the technical information. It still makes the hair on my arms stand up with a think of how easily we could screw up and threaten so many people.more
I hated this book so much. Crichton writes well, but he knows nothing about software or nanotech. However, it's his sexism which really makes this (and many of his other book) so bad. I only read it because I received it free, and now I regret reading it.more
The Michael Crichton technology play-book is pretty set. It goes like this: (a) find some type of technology that is scary, (b) have a reckless company dabble in this technology without any kind of safety protocol, and (c) have a virtuous hero who vainly warned of the potential troubles ahead of time save everyone's bacon in the end.Prey follows this script pretty closely. The scary technology is nanotechnology. The reckless corporation is Xymos. The virtuous hero is Jack Forman, and although he doesn't warn of the dangers of this technology ahead of time, he makes up for it by realizing how dangerous it is right away, even though no one else seems to be able to without his help. He is also made to seem even more virtuous because his wife works at Xymos and was the one who authorized the reckless experiments. She is also cheating on him, just in case you didn't figure out that she was a bad person.The nanotechnology story itself is fairly well-done, and the protagonist's efforts to control the rapidly evolving swarm makes for an interesting and exciting plot. However, Crichton's heavy-handed moralizing about evil corporate greed and the obviously reckless and foolish behavior of the corporate officers detracts from the impact of the book. If the story had a little less of that, it would have been a lot better. As it is, it is only a modestly entertaining diversion.more
The paperback cover quotes the New York Times Book review in part "Terrifying . . .irresistibly suspenseful." Indeed, the story Michael Crichton spins has elements of terror and at times the suspense grabs hold of the reader and does not let go.A tale of science run amuck on the tracks of greed and stupidity. Crichton mixes an old formula with new science.The finish is written as if the Crichton has a deadline to meet. Definitely, unsatisfying for a Michael Crichton read.Fortunately, for the reader, a bad Crichton book is better than most other authors seem able to generate on a good day.Reduce your expectations and the book will be satisfying.more
Prey is an extremely thrilling read about what can happen when cutting-edge science is applied by the military without regards to possible consequences. In Prey, nano-technology is utilised to create a swarm of deadly micro-robots. These robots are able to reproduce, survive on solar power and have a kind of hive-mind, allowing them to become one of the deadliest predators mankind has encountered. This is a very scary novel and I couldn't put it down. I highly recommend reading it.more
Typical Crichton novel, based upon building a thrilling story around a current scientific topic. This time it's nanotechnology and the dangers inherent therein. Educational and entertaining read.more
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