• book

From the Publisher

The off-season blahs, a pyromaniacal mom, and a recently retired husband who is constantly underfoot have poor Judith McMonigle Flynn going stir crazy at Hillside Manor. So the harried R&B hostess leaps at cousin Renie's suggestion that Judith accompany her to Creepers—the stately estate of kindly old Leota Burgess. The wealthy senior is certain that someone is determined to do her in for money—most likely one of her disreputable relatives—and Judith and Renie have agreed to look into her allegations. And when they stumble upon Leota's bruised but still breathing body at the foot of the grand staircase, they realize the old lady's fears may be well-founded. But the decidedly dead corpse lying on top of Leota—his head bashed flatter than the proverbial French pancake—suggests that there's more to these homicidal doings than meets the eye. And now it's up to the cousins to follow the clues to the creep who's creeping around Creepers with murder on the mind.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061736933
List price: $5.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Creeps Suzette
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

TIME
1 min read

Death, Disrupted

THE TITANS OF THE TECH INDUSTRY ARE KNOWN for their confidence that they can solve any problem—even, as it turns out, the one that’s defeated every other attempt so far. That’s why the most far-out strategies to cheat death are being tested in America’s playground for the young, deep-pocketed and brilliant: Silicon Valley. Larry Ellison, the co-founder of Oracle, has given more than $330 million to research about aging and age-related diseases. Alphabet CEO and co-founder Larry Page launched Calico, a research company that targets ways to improve the human lifespan. Peter Thiel, co-founder of
NPR
3 min read

Art Is A Matter Of Life And Death In 'The Electric Sublime'

In a time when most types of government spending are under attack, a few brave souls have stepped up to defend those perpetually endangered hillocks of federally funded refinement, the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities. The defenders haven't always managed so well. In a recent New York Times piece, Nicholas Kristof went so far as to argue that the august tradition of human cultural achievement should indeed be sustained because it has helped, somehow, to limit the practice of keeping hens in small cages. "The humanities have even reshaped our diet," he marveled. Kristof is just t
TIME
1 min read

Milestones

DIED Amy Krouse Rosenthal, prolific children’s-book author and short-film maker, at 51. In early March, Rosenthal penned an emotional New York Times Modern Love column about life after her imminent death, titled “You May Want to Marry My Husband.” › Howard Hodgkin, Turner Prize–winning British artist known for his abstract paintings and prints, at 84. Hodgkin, whose creations were often inspired by the colors and warmth of India, worked up until his death, with two exhibitions of his work due to open this year. › Carol Field, food writer, at 76. Her 1985 cookbook, The Italian Baker, introdu