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Ben Wolf has big things planned for his senior year. Had big things planned. Now what he has is some very bad news and only one year left to make his mark on the world.

How can a pint-sized, smart-ass seventeen-year-old do anything significant in the nowheresville of Trout, Idaho?

First, Ben makes sure that no one else knows what is going on—not his superstar quarterback brother, Cody, not his parents, not his coach, no one. Next, he decides to become the best 127-pound football player Trout High has ever seen; to give his close-minded civics teacher a daily migraine; and to help the local drunk clean up his act.

And then there's Dallas Suzuki. Amazingly perfect, fascinating Dallas Suzuki, who may or may not give Ben the time of day. Really, she's first on the list.

Living with a secret isn't easy, though, and Ben's resolve begins to crumble . . . especially when he realizes that he isn't the only person in Trout with secrets.

Topics: Family, Grief, and Small Town

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061908316
List price: $9.99
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tearjerker, but good.more
Right before his senior year, Ben gets the news that his senior year might be the last year of his life - he has cancer. Instead of getting treatment, Ben decides to live his life to its fullest. This also means not being treated differently - which means he can't tell anyone, not his friends, not his family. As the year begins, Ben takes risks he wouldn't normally take and people start to notice the difference...eventually he will have to tell, but when?This one is a thinker...and not for those who don't want to contemplate their own existence or think they are invincible.This is the first book of his I've read and I was surprised that while sports were a big part of the story, even if you don't like sports there is plenty of story line.more
This is one of those books that the summary can scare readers off. Even though this story has a sad premise, it is full of good humor, some fun, and an especially poignant journey to a teen boy’s enlightenment. Parts of the book can get a little bogged down in the details of sports such as football, but that, in fact, may be what draws many readers in (I’m guessing teen males). The main character, Ben, discovers untouched strength, honesty, and his abilities to accept imperfections in others. All with easy, approachable language and a heavy dose of wit, Deadline is a journey not to be missed! However, I must state that some readers (particularly readers on the younger end of the YA range) may need to know that subjects such as incest, child molestation, sex, and child abuse are discussed openly and honestly in this story.more
I don't know why I thought that Deadline would be humorous considering it is a story about death. It isn't. Most of it was great, awesome, it just had one tiny little flaw.First let me praise this book. I seriously really love this book. Deadline is about the journey of Ben Wolf's last year alive. He has leukemia, a aggressive form, that is going to kill him with or without treatment. All it would do is maybe prolong his life a little. The Fault in Our Stars is still very much in my thoughts, I read it last month so I was a little worry that the topic was too similar for me to give Deadline a real fair read. Would I compare it too much, I wondered? It's different and the same. Ben's approach is to live his life to the fullest and try to experience as much as he can. He becomes brave where he was afraid, he becomes confident where he was unsure. I love the character of Ben, so much. I understood his reasoning behind his actions, though I didn't agree and as he is talking to Hey-Soos in his dreams he is growing spiritually, as well as seeing things so much more clearly (some great moments). Ben is opening his eyes to the way of the world, and we are right along for the ride. We love when he triumphs, we cheer him on when he asking his crush out. He's a protagonist I dare you not to like. Deadline is a much more serious book than I imagined I was getting when I bought it. It was depressing yet had it's moments when your smile couldn't get any bigger. I think Chris Crutcher has a way of bringing so many different angles to story. I am a now a fan.My only problem with Deadline is a secret that comes to light. It seems that though Ben is keeping a huge secret to himself, two people in his life decide to reveal theirs to him. One of those secrets I don't know what purpose it had in Deadline. I wonder why Mr. Crutcher put it in there? Am I missing something? There seem to be no reason for it, it didn't change the story, it didn't do anything storywise, so why put it in. If you have read Deadline and can give me a understanding of it's purpose that would be great. Oh, and it's secret number one told to him that I don't understand. Despite the one small thing I didn't understand, I absolutely love Deadline. I thought it was a thought provoking novel with an awesome main character. Yes, I cried. I love Ben Wolf.more
When Ben's routine sports physical turns up a rare, terminal blood disease, he makes a decision not to undergo treatment. He wants to live out the rest of his numbered days with as much normality as possible, so he also decides not to tell anyone. Suddenly, Ben's challenged to live the rest of his life in the one year he has left. So he goes out for football, he makes a move on his megacrush Dallas Suzuki, and he uses a Current Events class project to try and leave a lasting impression on the tiny Idaho town that's been his only home. It turns out life is much different when you're living on a deadline. This is a story with a lot of meat. It almost verges off into crazytown, but Crutcher is a master writer who manages to address a number of issues without overwhelming the reader. Ben is a smart narrator, supplementing his school reading with a number of important books. I'd recommend this for your college-bound teens (if they're not too sensitive to Issues... nothing graphic, but there's definitely mature content here). The character of Ben really reminded me of John Green's writing, so I'd recommend this to his numerous fans, as well. Crutcher sprinkles the serious subject matter with humorous moments and this is definitely a book that will make for interesting discussions.more
Ben wolf finds out he has terminal cancer his senior year of high school.He wants a normal senior year so he tells no one and ends up with an epic senior year. What would you do if you knew you had a year to live with so much left of your life??????????YA: mild language, sexual abuse discussed (not graphic), he loses is virginity (not graphic)Crutcher is one of my favorite YA authors simply because his plot twists always take me by surprise. I was hesitant to read this book because after all, you know Ben is going to die and I prefer more uplifting books. I read it anyway and I was glad I did. The idea of not telling anyone you are going to die and taking all the risks you might otherwise not take during your senior year of high school was so engaging to read. He gets to do things he never would have dreamed of doing. Of course, you know that there will be a price to pay in the end and there is. Even though I thought the book was inspirational, I did cry at the ending. Something I rarely find myself doing. So yes, it is a tear jerker but it is worth the read.more
this book was great. It was a bit slow in the beginning, at least to me. It was not what I expected. The author managed to present Ben with a comedic and heartwarming way. Ben is a fighter, even to the end. You will probably learn a bit from him too. I know I did. He was inspiring and definitely a character I won't forget. There are quite a few football references, but don't let that stop you. overall, I recommend this book to anyone who doesn't mind tearing up a bit, someone who want's a hint of inspiration. READ IT! :)more
Crutcher brings the world of Ben Wolf alive in this emotionally stirring read. Ben's struggles with telling the truth are universal truths many of us don't recognize until it is too late. Once Ben finally speaks the truth to those he loves the most, he finds the ultimate freedom he has been looking for, and since I have stared truth in the face in my recent experiences, I completely identified with Ben and Cody. Be sure you bring a few tissues because your own emotions about truth will fall as soft tears...in a good way. :O)more
This book was great. The writing is sharp. While the story could be a depressing march to the end of Ben's life instead it's full of humor and probing questions as the main character stuggles to decide the best way to handle his situation. The author writes in a manner that treats his target audience with respect, recognizing that difficult, sometimes awful, things happen to people of all ages, giving them a well written story that presented in a manner that is not condescending or candy coated.more
Excellent read. Ben was such a witty character, and faced his situation with bravery. I was a bit disappointed that his mother didn't have more interaction with him in the end, but at least Dallas managed to say goodbye. Grab some tissues and enjoy this one!more
The 18 year old Ben Wolf is diagnosed with an incurable rare blood disease and has only one year to live. He decides to keep his secret from everybody even his family and friends. He tries to fulfill some of his wishes. He joins the football team of his school and gets one of the best in the team. He gets friend with the girl, Dalas Suzuki, who is in love with. After Dalas reveals her secret, he realizes that keeping his secret from those who love him is unfair and reveals his secret. His friends and family have different reaction to keeping the secret; especially his girlfriend gets mad at him. So he realizes that revealing the truth sometimes does not make things easier. The book is very well written and the story is well-paced. The characters are interesting and dynamic. This book seems appealing for high school boys. The hidden message of the story is live your life as if you are going to live forever and try to fulfill all your dreams.Awards: ALA Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers, Young Readers Choice Awards 2010 nominee for senior devision.more
This book is really funny and has a lot of humor in it.more
The premise is almost too unbelievable, yet Mr. Crutcher manages to make it plausible enough. Ben is an engaging character - despite language and philosophies that rubbed me the wrong way, I liked Ben and admired the way he took risks and went searching for truth. In the end, the story turned a little preachy - trying to wrap up the mystery of death in some way - but overall an enjoyable story.more
High school senior Ben Wolf is smart, short, and dying. After being diagnosed with a terminal illness, Ben decides to forgo treatment, keep his illness a secret from everyone (he's 18, so his doctor doesn't have to tell his parents), go out for the football team, date the girl of his dreams, and try to make some sense of the world before he leaves it. Ben narrates the book with the voice of an intelligent teenager, at times cocky and confidant, but also often uncertain and confused, about his illness, his family, and the world around him. He looks for meaning by talking to adults he trusts, arguing with ones he doesn't, and reading a number of books (The Autobiography of Malcolm X plays a key role in the novel). Ben's illness is not the only somber element of the story, his mother is completely debilitated from bipolar disorder, his girlfriend was sexually abused by her uncle, he meets a former priest with a terrible secret, and one of his teammates is physically abused by his father. However, Ben's teenage snarkiness and upbeat narration and world view keep the novel from being dragged down by all the suffering. Additionally, sports are central to the story, there are many exciting and suspenseful narrations of Ben's football games and also the girls' volleyball games. Deadline is intelligent, entertaining and deeply emotional, without being too corny or off-putting to teens. Adult situations and language make this book most appropriate for older teenagers.more
Beautifully written novel about a boy with only one year left to live and the choices he makes. Crutcher tells the story without being maudlin, but if you're like me, you'll bawl like a baby by the inevitable end.more
Ben chooses to live every day to the fullest instead of dwelling on his upcoming death. It was slightly hard to believe a young 18 year old wouldn't need to tell someone and would be mature enough to make all the medical decisions he did, but that is a minor criticism. This book is written for teens with a moral to appreciate your life and make the most of it. Recognize what is important and act as you would want to be remembered. I recommend it for all teens but adults will find it forced and overly dramatic.more
At a routine annual sports physical, Ben Wolf learns before his senior year of high school that he has just one year to live. Wanting a "normal" year, he makes the extraordinary decision to NOT tell his parents, his brother Cody, his friends or coach. Although his doctor disagrees with this choice, he respects Ben's decision and stays quiet. Ben determines THIS will be the year he goes out for football, the year he gets the girl of his dreams, and the year he drives his history teacher crazy. As Cody's year progresses, his friends confide in him, sharing their own shameful secrets, and he ends up feeling like a terrible friend keeping his from them. To cope, Ben has conversations in his dreams with alter-ego/god figure Hey-Soos who guides him toward a fitting conclusion.The exciting football scenes and the conversations between brothers make this an excellent choice for guys who love sports, though anyone who picks it up will root for Ben.more
At the beginning of his senior year in high school, Ben Wolff learns that he has a blood disease and he only has about one year to live. Deciding not to receive treatment or tell any family or friends, Ben sets out to have his last "normal" year.Crutcher does his usual fine job of writing in the voice of of a teenage boy in crisis. I expected to be very depressed and sad given the subject matter of this story, but it was heart-warming in a way. Highly recommended.more
Ben Wolf faces a surprising senior year: playing football (after a legacy of success on the track), dating stellar Dallas Suzuki, and politiking for a Malcolm X Street in little ol' Trout, ID. He's also facing his own mortatility -- he has less than a year to live. It's a secret he keeps from all until the end. And Ben discovers there are other, bigger surprises awaiting. Good descriptions of football action, sibling rivalry (bigger, younger brother, Cody) and teenage relationships. Thought-provoking and realistic; the kind of YA novel that gives the genre a good name.more
What would you do if you only had one year to live? Throughout this novel, Ben Wolf is trying to live his life to the fullest after receiving the news from his doctor that he was only going to live one more year.He is the only one who knows of this news, not even his family knows about the fatal news. Ben creates new friendships and hobbies as he tries to have the best last year. I recommend this book to anyone! It is very good!more
A boy finds out he is terminally ill right before his senior year. He decided to not tell anyone and make it the year of his lifetime--going out for football, going after the girl he's always admired. He finds that keeping the secret though, has consequences. I loved this book. I thought the dialogue was excellent--totally sounded like the teens around here. I could also really relate to all the characters and found it to be a great story.Reviewed by:Lisa NiederMathematics teachermore
About a boy named Ben who goes to the doctor and finds out that he has a deadly disease. He has only one year to live. He plans not to tell his mother, father, and brother because he doesn't want to worry them. He wants to make his senior year the best ever. He asks out the girl that he's always liked and ends up falling in love. He tries out for football and ends up being really good. He starts to get weak but still doesn't tell anyone. He tells his parents, brother and friends and they are very shocked with the terrible news. He finally dies at the end but his memory lives on. This book teaches you that you should live every moment to the fullest just like Ben did!more
I first read Crutcher as a college student, a short story collection for my Lit. for Adolescents class. "Boys like his writing," the teacher said. And they do, but the nice thing is that Crutcher's books are enjoyable by anyone, even people as far from being a jock as I am.Sure, there were parts of this book that I may have skimmed--the football game play-by-plays that went right over my head--but the majority of this book about a high school senior who discovers he has a terminal disease and decides to keep it to himself in order to live a normal life was very enjoyable. The voice of Ben "Little Wolf" is engaging and the first person present narration feels very immediate and keeps the action rolling along, even when the book is focusing on Ben's internal demons. The dialogue was snappy, and the characters seemed pretty believable.Other things were not as believable--like the whole idea that the doctors and therapists would seriously allow an 18-year-old to make the decision to deny all treatment without any kind of real attempt to alert his family, or the strange "Hey-Soos" character that seems to be a nice device for the author to deliver some deep thoughts and morals to the story while entertaining the readers with that snappy dialogue I mentioned and of course some excellent humor. The author could have spent more time developing the characters of the parents as well, since Ben's mother's bipolar disorder was supposedly his main reason for not telling his family, but really she's just sort of absent for most of the book, and then of course her reaction to the news in the end is one of the least dramatic scenes in the book.Overall, the book was a fun read, I enjoyed the story and the telling of it, and I connected emotionally to the characters--enough to need some tissues while reading the ending.more
'Dying child' memoirs are not my favourite genre, but this one stood out because it was over the top, and quiet. When Ben finds out that he'll be lucky to live through his senior year he decides to live life entirely on his terms. This includes joining the football team, reforming the town alcoholic, and asking out the girl of his dreams. But living life to the full isn't as easy as it seems - especially when you don't tell anyone you're dying. I especially liked Ben's relationship with his brother.more
I read Dealine for a young adult materials class I am taking for my MLS. I fell in love with the book and can't wait to read more Chris Crutcher. I don't like to give too much of the plot away, since I think some readers like to "discover" the story by themselves, but I will say that I cried! Chris Crutcher is very easy to read and has a gift for saying a lot with few words. His characters are smart and fun and it is easy to find peices of people you know in them.more
Read all 55 reviews

Reviews

tearjerker, but good.more
Right before his senior year, Ben gets the news that his senior year might be the last year of his life - he has cancer. Instead of getting treatment, Ben decides to live his life to its fullest. This also means not being treated differently - which means he can't tell anyone, not his friends, not his family. As the year begins, Ben takes risks he wouldn't normally take and people start to notice the difference...eventually he will have to tell, but when?This one is a thinker...and not for those who don't want to contemplate their own existence or think they are invincible.This is the first book of his I've read and I was surprised that while sports were a big part of the story, even if you don't like sports there is plenty of story line.more
This is one of those books that the summary can scare readers off. Even though this story has a sad premise, it is full of good humor, some fun, and an especially poignant journey to a teen boy’s enlightenment. Parts of the book can get a little bogged down in the details of sports such as football, but that, in fact, may be what draws many readers in (I’m guessing teen males). The main character, Ben, discovers untouched strength, honesty, and his abilities to accept imperfections in others. All with easy, approachable language and a heavy dose of wit, Deadline is a journey not to be missed! However, I must state that some readers (particularly readers on the younger end of the YA range) may need to know that subjects such as incest, child molestation, sex, and child abuse are discussed openly and honestly in this story.more
I don't know why I thought that Deadline would be humorous considering it is a story about death. It isn't. Most of it was great, awesome, it just had one tiny little flaw.First let me praise this book. I seriously really love this book. Deadline is about the journey of Ben Wolf's last year alive. He has leukemia, a aggressive form, that is going to kill him with or without treatment. All it would do is maybe prolong his life a little. The Fault in Our Stars is still very much in my thoughts, I read it last month so I was a little worry that the topic was too similar for me to give Deadline a real fair read. Would I compare it too much, I wondered? It's different and the same. Ben's approach is to live his life to the fullest and try to experience as much as he can. He becomes brave where he was afraid, he becomes confident where he was unsure. I love the character of Ben, so much. I understood his reasoning behind his actions, though I didn't agree and as he is talking to Hey-Soos in his dreams he is growing spiritually, as well as seeing things so much more clearly (some great moments). Ben is opening his eyes to the way of the world, and we are right along for the ride. We love when he triumphs, we cheer him on when he asking his crush out. He's a protagonist I dare you not to like. Deadline is a much more serious book than I imagined I was getting when I bought it. It was depressing yet had it's moments when your smile couldn't get any bigger. I think Chris Crutcher has a way of bringing so many different angles to story. I am a now a fan.My only problem with Deadline is a secret that comes to light. It seems that though Ben is keeping a huge secret to himself, two people in his life decide to reveal theirs to him. One of those secrets I don't know what purpose it had in Deadline. I wonder why Mr. Crutcher put it in there? Am I missing something? There seem to be no reason for it, it didn't change the story, it didn't do anything storywise, so why put it in. If you have read Deadline and can give me a understanding of it's purpose that would be great. Oh, and it's secret number one told to him that I don't understand. Despite the one small thing I didn't understand, I absolutely love Deadline. I thought it was a thought provoking novel with an awesome main character. Yes, I cried. I love Ben Wolf.more
When Ben's routine sports physical turns up a rare, terminal blood disease, he makes a decision not to undergo treatment. He wants to live out the rest of his numbered days with as much normality as possible, so he also decides not to tell anyone. Suddenly, Ben's challenged to live the rest of his life in the one year he has left. So he goes out for football, he makes a move on his megacrush Dallas Suzuki, and he uses a Current Events class project to try and leave a lasting impression on the tiny Idaho town that's been his only home. It turns out life is much different when you're living on a deadline. This is a story with a lot of meat. It almost verges off into crazytown, but Crutcher is a master writer who manages to address a number of issues without overwhelming the reader. Ben is a smart narrator, supplementing his school reading with a number of important books. I'd recommend this for your college-bound teens (if they're not too sensitive to Issues... nothing graphic, but there's definitely mature content here). The character of Ben really reminded me of John Green's writing, so I'd recommend this to his numerous fans, as well. Crutcher sprinkles the serious subject matter with humorous moments and this is definitely a book that will make for interesting discussions.more
Ben wolf finds out he has terminal cancer his senior year of high school.He wants a normal senior year so he tells no one and ends up with an epic senior year. What would you do if you knew you had a year to live with so much left of your life??????????YA: mild language, sexual abuse discussed (not graphic), he loses is virginity (not graphic)Crutcher is one of my favorite YA authors simply because his plot twists always take me by surprise. I was hesitant to read this book because after all, you know Ben is going to die and I prefer more uplifting books. I read it anyway and I was glad I did. The idea of not telling anyone you are going to die and taking all the risks you might otherwise not take during your senior year of high school was so engaging to read. He gets to do things he never would have dreamed of doing. Of course, you know that there will be a price to pay in the end and there is. Even though I thought the book was inspirational, I did cry at the ending. Something I rarely find myself doing. So yes, it is a tear jerker but it is worth the read.more
this book was great. It was a bit slow in the beginning, at least to me. It was not what I expected. The author managed to present Ben with a comedic and heartwarming way. Ben is a fighter, even to the end. You will probably learn a bit from him too. I know I did. He was inspiring and definitely a character I won't forget. There are quite a few football references, but don't let that stop you. overall, I recommend this book to anyone who doesn't mind tearing up a bit, someone who want's a hint of inspiration. READ IT! :)more
Crutcher brings the world of Ben Wolf alive in this emotionally stirring read. Ben's struggles with telling the truth are universal truths many of us don't recognize until it is too late. Once Ben finally speaks the truth to those he loves the most, he finds the ultimate freedom he has been looking for, and since I have stared truth in the face in my recent experiences, I completely identified with Ben and Cody. Be sure you bring a few tissues because your own emotions about truth will fall as soft tears...in a good way. :O)more
This book was great. The writing is sharp. While the story could be a depressing march to the end of Ben's life instead it's full of humor and probing questions as the main character stuggles to decide the best way to handle his situation. The author writes in a manner that treats his target audience with respect, recognizing that difficult, sometimes awful, things happen to people of all ages, giving them a well written story that presented in a manner that is not condescending or candy coated.more
Excellent read. Ben was such a witty character, and faced his situation with bravery. I was a bit disappointed that his mother didn't have more interaction with him in the end, but at least Dallas managed to say goodbye. Grab some tissues and enjoy this one!more
The 18 year old Ben Wolf is diagnosed with an incurable rare blood disease and has only one year to live. He decides to keep his secret from everybody even his family and friends. He tries to fulfill some of his wishes. He joins the football team of his school and gets one of the best in the team. He gets friend with the girl, Dalas Suzuki, who is in love with. After Dalas reveals her secret, he realizes that keeping his secret from those who love him is unfair and reveals his secret. His friends and family have different reaction to keeping the secret; especially his girlfriend gets mad at him. So he realizes that revealing the truth sometimes does not make things easier. The book is very well written and the story is well-paced. The characters are interesting and dynamic. This book seems appealing for high school boys. The hidden message of the story is live your life as if you are going to live forever and try to fulfill all your dreams.Awards: ALA Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers, Young Readers Choice Awards 2010 nominee for senior devision.more
This book is really funny and has a lot of humor in it.more
The premise is almost too unbelievable, yet Mr. Crutcher manages to make it plausible enough. Ben is an engaging character - despite language and philosophies that rubbed me the wrong way, I liked Ben and admired the way he took risks and went searching for truth. In the end, the story turned a little preachy - trying to wrap up the mystery of death in some way - but overall an enjoyable story.more
High school senior Ben Wolf is smart, short, and dying. After being diagnosed with a terminal illness, Ben decides to forgo treatment, keep his illness a secret from everyone (he's 18, so his doctor doesn't have to tell his parents), go out for the football team, date the girl of his dreams, and try to make some sense of the world before he leaves it. Ben narrates the book with the voice of an intelligent teenager, at times cocky and confidant, but also often uncertain and confused, about his illness, his family, and the world around him. He looks for meaning by talking to adults he trusts, arguing with ones he doesn't, and reading a number of books (The Autobiography of Malcolm X plays a key role in the novel). Ben's illness is not the only somber element of the story, his mother is completely debilitated from bipolar disorder, his girlfriend was sexually abused by her uncle, he meets a former priest with a terrible secret, and one of his teammates is physically abused by his father. However, Ben's teenage snarkiness and upbeat narration and world view keep the novel from being dragged down by all the suffering. Additionally, sports are central to the story, there are many exciting and suspenseful narrations of Ben's football games and also the girls' volleyball games. Deadline is intelligent, entertaining and deeply emotional, without being too corny or off-putting to teens. Adult situations and language make this book most appropriate for older teenagers.more
Beautifully written novel about a boy with only one year left to live and the choices he makes. Crutcher tells the story without being maudlin, but if you're like me, you'll bawl like a baby by the inevitable end.more
Ben chooses to live every day to the fullest instead of dwelling on his upcoming death. It was slightly hard to believe a young 18 year old wouldn't need to tell someone and would be mature enough to make all the medical decisions he did, but that is a minor criticism. This book is written for teens with a moral to appreciate your life and make the most of it. Recognize what is important and act as you would want to be remembered. I recommend it for all teens but adults will find it forced and overly dramatic.more
At a routine annual sports physical, Ben Wolf learns before his senior year of high school that he has just one year to live. Wanting a "normal" year, he makes the extraordinary decision to NOT tell his parents, his brother Cody, his friends or coach. Although his doctor disagrees with this choice, he respects Ben's decision and stays quiet. Ben determines THIS will be the year he goes out for football, the year he gets the girl of his dreams, and the year he drives his history teacher crazy. As Cody's year progresses, his friends confide in him, sharing their own shameful secrets, and he ends up feeling like a terrible friend keeping his from them. To cope, Ben has conversations in his dreams with alter-ego/god figure Hey-Soos who guides him toward a fitting conclusion.The exciting football scenes and the conversations between brothers make this an excellent choice for guys who love sports, though anyone who picks it up will root for Ben.more
At the beginning of his senior year in high school, Ben Wolff learns that he has a blood disease and he only has about one year to live. Deciding not to receive treatment or tell any family or friends, Ben sets out to have his last "normal" year.Crutcher does his usual fine job of writing in the voice of of a teenage boy in crisis. I expected to be very depressed and sad given the subject matter of this story, but it was heart-warming in a way. Highly recommended.more
Ben Wolf faces a surprising senior year: playing football (after a legacy of success on the track), dating stellar Dallas Suzuki, and politiking for a Malcolm X Street in little ol' Trout, ID. He's also facing his own mortatility -- he has less than a year to live. It's a secret he keeps from all until the end. And Ben discovers there are other, bigger surprises awaiting. Good descriptions of football action, sibling rivalry (bigger, younger brother, Cody) and teenage relationships. Thought-provoking and realistic; the kind of YA novel that gives the genre a good name.more
What would you do if you only had one year to live? Throughout this novel, Ben Wolf is trying to live his life to the fullest after receiving the news from his doctor that he was only going to live one more year.He is the only one who knows of this news, not even his family knows about the fatal news. Ben creates new friendships and hobbies as he tries to have the best last year. I recommend this book to anyone! It is very good!more
A boy finds out he is terminally ill right before his senior year. He decided to not tell anyone and make it the year of his lifetime--going out for football, going after the girl he's always admired. He finds that keeping the secret though, has consequences. I loved this book. I thought the dialogue was excellent--totally sounded like the teens around here. I could also really relate to all the characters and found it to be a great story.Reviewed by:Lisa NiederMathematics teachermore
About a boy named Ben who goes to the doctor and finds out that he has a deadly disease. He has only one year to live. He plans not to tell his mother, father, and brother because he doesn't want to worry them. He wants to make his senior year the best ever. He asks out the girl that he's always liked and ends up falling in love. He tries out for football and ends up being really good. He starts to get weak but still doesn't tell anyone. He tells his parents, brother and friends and they are very shocked with the terrible news. He finally dies at the end but his memory lives on. This book teaches you that you should live every moment to the fullest just like Ben did!more
I first read Crutcher as a college student, a short story collection for my Lit. for Adolescents class. "Boys like his writing," the teacher said. And they do, but the nice thing is that Crutcher's books are enjoyable by anyone, even people as far from being a jock as I am.Sure, there were parts of this book that I may have skimmed--the football game play-by-plays that went right over my head--but the majority of this book about a high school senior who discovers he has a terminal disease and decides to keep it to himself in order to live a normal life was very enjoyable. The voice of Ben "Little Wolf" is engaging and the first person present narration feels very immediate and keeps the action rolling along, even when the book is focusing on Ben's internal demons. The dialogue was snappy, and the characters seemed pretty believable.Other things were not as believable--like the whole idea that the doctors and therapists would seriously allow an 18-year-old to make the decision to deny all treatment without any kind of real attempt to alert his family, or the strange "Hey-Soos" character that seems to be a nice device for the author to deliver some deep thoughts and morals to the story while entertaining the readers with that snappy dialogue I mentioned and of course some excellent humor. The author could have spent more time developing the characters of the parents as well, since Ben's mother's bipolar disorder was supposedly his main reason for not telling his family, but really she's just sort of absent for most of the book, and then of course her reaction to the news in the end is one of the least dramatic scenes in the book.Overall, the book was a fun read, I enjoyed the story and the telling of it, and I connected emotionally to the characters--enough to need some tissues while reading the ending.more
'Dying child' memoirs are not my favourite genre, but this one stood out because it was over the top, and quiet. When Ben finds out that he'll be lucky to live through his senior year he decides to live life entirely on his terms. This includes joining the football team, reforming the town alcoholic, and asking out the girl of his dreams. But living life to the full isn't as easy as it seems - especially when you don't tell anyone you're dying. I especially liked Ben's relationship with his brother.more
I read Dealine for a young adult materials class I am taking for my MLS. I fell in love with the book and can't wait to read more Chris Crutcher. I don't like to give too much of the plot away, since I think some readers like to "discover" the story by themselves, but I will say that I cried! Chris Crutcher is very easy to read and has a gift for saying a lot with few words. His characters are smart and fun and it is easy to find peices of people you know in them.more
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