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NASCAR racing, once considered no more than a regional circuit of moonshiners pounding around low-country dirt tracks in a cloud of red dust and cliché, has somehow become America's fastest-growing spectator sport. With 75 million ardent fans, it is a sports entertainment empire built at the very crossroads of pop culture, corporate commerce, and American mythology -- a platinum-plated, V-8 hero machine.

Smart, funny, and profane, Sunday Money is the kaleidoscopic account of a season on the NASCAR circuit. Driving 48,000 miles in a tiny motor home, Jeff MacGregor and his wife tracked the lives of superstar drivers like Junior Earnhardt and Tony Stewart, their crews, and their fans across the grinding reach of a 40-week season.

More than just a behind-the-scenes chronicle of America's loudest pastime, Sunday Money is the story of a hundred stories, of red states and blue, of splendid Rebels and Yankee hotshoes. It is a brilliant snapshot of American culture -- of race, religion, class, sex, money, and fame -- taken from the window of a moving car.

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061856860
List price: $8.99
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Too much of the author, not enough of racers and racing.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The only real sport, everything else is just a game.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was a good book for me to read to dispel my ignorance of NASCAR as a sport. Like large parts of the rest of the general public, I have been aware of NASCAR in a vague way. And have seen some of the big ones (I learned from this book that that is the term for a large pile up of a bunch of cars crashing into each other) on televised highlights of races. I colleague with whom I worked for quite a few years followed NASCAR intently and so I heard some of his comments. I am glad that this was the book that I picked to find out about the topic because the author explained in terms that I could understand. Also, his comments were not value judgements boldly stated. Rather, the author wrote a basic account of facts and sensory data that he experienced, and let the reader judge the meaning of it. But I could not help thinking that underneath his calm demeanor, he thought that a lot of things were either amazing, or stupid, or wonderful, or zany, as the case may be. If you, like me, are starting out completely ignorant about some of the history of NASCAR, and want to find out to watch for when you are tuned in to TV, then definitely, please read this book.I relished the parts of the book where the author talks about the good old days, when tickets were $10, and it was not over-run by media hype and phony hangers-on. I wonder if it is true that every good artistic or sports trend is ruined when big business invades and takes over the sponsorship. Probably. But all sentimental indulgence in old-times for old-times' sake. I also loved the story about the bootleg whiskey runners and their souped-up cars. The stories of how he passed his time while driving back and forth across the country with his wife: they read books to each other.Definitely worth it. I will seek out any other books that this author has written.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Too much of the author, not enough of racers and racing.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The only real sport, everything else is just a game.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was a good book for me to read to dispel my ignorance of NASCAR as a sport. Like large parts of the rest of the general public, I have been aware of NASCAR in a vague way. And have seen some of the big ones (I learned from this book that that is the term for a large pile up of a bunch of cars crashing into each other) on televised highlights of races. I colleague with whom I worked for quite a few years followed NASCAR intently and so I heard some of his comments. I am glad that this was the book that I picked to find out about the topic because the author explained in terms that I could understand. Also, his comments were not value judgements boldly stated. Rather, the author wrote a basic account of facts and sensory data that he experienced, and let the reader judge the meaning of it. But I could not help thinking that underneath his calm demeanor, he thought that a lot of things were either amazing, or stupid, or wonderful, or zany, as the case may be. If you, like me, are starting out completely ignorant about some of the history of NASCAR, and want to find out to watch for when you are tuned in to TV, then definitely, please read this book.I relished the parts of the book where the author talks about the good old days, when tickets were $10, and it was not over-run by media hype and phony hangers-on. I wonder if it is true that every good artistic or sports trend is ruined when big business invades and takes over the sponsorship. Probably. But all sentimental indulgence in old-times for old-times' sake. I also loved the story about the bootleg whiskey runners and their souped-up cars. The stories of how he passed his time while driving back and forth across the country with his wife: they read books to each other.Definitely worth it. I will seek out any other books that this author has written.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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