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In the third trimester of her pregnancy, Baltimore private investigator Tess Monaghan is under doctor's orders to remain immobile. Bored and restless, reduced to watching the world go by outside her window, she takes small comfort in the mundane events she observes . . . like the young woman in a green raincoat who walks her dog at the same time every day. Then one day the dog is running free and its owner is nowhere to be seen. Certain that something is terribly wrong, and incapable of leaving well enough alone, Tess is determined to get to the bottom of the dog walker's abrupt disappearance, even if she must do so from her own bedroom. But her inquisitiveness is about to fling open a dangerous Pandora's box of past crimes and troubling deaths . . . and she's not only putting her own life in jeopardy but also her unborn child's.

Previously serialized in the New York Times, and now published in book form for the very first time, The Girl in the Green Raincoat is a masterful Hitchcockian thriller from one of the very best in the business: multiple award-winner Laura Lippman.

Topics: Women Detectives, Private Investigators, Crime, Murder, Missing Persons, Marriage, Pregnancy, Dogs, Baltimore, and Series

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062042378
List price: $7.99
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Tess Monaghan, the full time private detective and part-time control freak, is put on bed rest prior to the birth of her first child. Tess is not one to sit around, and with only Judge Judy and Oprah for companions, she believes she is destined to lose her mind. Unable to find much to do but watch people out the window, Tess notices a young lady walking her dog every day at the same time. The girl's dog wears a matching green raincoat, which leads Tess to speculate about the woman and who she is talking to on her cell phone every afternoon. Until one day, the dog with the raincoat comes running across the park dragging his leash and the girl is nowhere to be found. Tess is, of course, unable to let this go and becomes concerned about the fate of the young woman, who doesn't return to the park with her dog after that day. Alas, Tess pulls in her friends and fellow private detectives to figure out who the girl is and what might have happened to her. In the process, Tess finds herself in danger, as an extremely pregnant woman on bedrest can do little to protect herself from potential threat...This was a very quick read and fairly entertaining. Tess is driven and witty and the story moved along at a good and suspenseful pace. Though somewhat predictable, I enjoyed the story, which takes a twist from the typical private detective storyline.more
Enjoyable, light mystery in a series I haven't tried before. I would read more.more
Laura Lippman's slender mystery "The Girl in the Green Raincoat," first published in the New York Times Sunday Magazine, has a lot of "Rear Window" in it. And like the Hitchcock movie classic, this story is a winner.Tess Monaghan, the private investigator featured in several of Lippman's novels, is about eight months into a difficult (and unplanned) pregnancy. Other than trips between her bed and her bathroom, she is confined virtually to one spot. That spot gives her a view of the street, where she often notices a young woman in a green raincoat walking her dog. One day, Tess sees the dog, but not the woman.After a few days pass without noticing the woman walk past, and with nothing better to do, Tess does some checking using her phone, her computer and her friends. She learns that the missing woman's husband has had two wives and one girlfriend die under peculiar circumstances.Whitney, Tess's attractive friend, gets the Grace Kelly role in this story. She is sent to meet Don Epstein, the husband, and to try to get some information out of him while pretending to be a vulnerable woman with few close friends or family members, the kind of woman he seems to be drawn to. Things soon get tense for Whitney and, later, for Tess herself.This slender mystery offers an abundance of wit, romance and, eventually, excitement. It also provides one of the most unexpectedly poignant lines one is likely to find in a mystery story. After she survives her ordeal, Tess, who has been anxious about what changes her baby will mean for her life and her career, begins to view things differently. She recalls that she has known since early girlhood where babies come from. "Now, at thirty-five, in despair over her lack of maternal instincts, she had finally learned where mothers come from."Fans of Lippman's series will be interested to find out what now awaits this private investigator/mommy.more
I would not consider this book a great work of literature but I enjoyed it so much and it filled such a hole in me that I had to give it 5 stars.A comfy, cosy mystery with the very pregnant Tess bedridden in her last trimester and spending her days on her sun porch watching the world outside. Each day she waits and watches for those who daily walk their dogs past her windows. And each day she sees an attractive young lady in a green raincoat, green pumps, with a green umbrella walking a dog in a matching green raincoat. One day she sees the little dog go running by with his green leash flying behind him. Even though she is bedridden she must find out what has happened to the little dog's owner. A truly enjoyable book. Just right for those rough patches in one's R/L.Recommended but book 12 out of a series of 13. I need to go back and find the 1st.more
This cozy mystery novella is sure to entertain fans of Laura Lippman. Just don’t jump to conclusions! Parts of the plot may have a familiar ring to them, but don’t assume the clues lead to a similar conclusion. Sometimes, curiosity that is meant to help does everything but help. You should know who really does need saving before making the attempt, or it might just be you who is in need of rescuing!more
Originally serialized in the New York Times, this novella is a quick fun read and a good plot, and great characters. It's worth reading for the witty commentary alone.more
The Girl in the Green Raincoat was a fun book. I don't think I have read any other mysteries featuring Tess but she did seem familiar so maybe I have. HmmmmmmmmI felt for Tess who was on "bed rest" because of a high risk pregnancy. I went through that myself when I was pregnant with my boys and it's not fun. It was easy to see how she watched people out of her window and made up stories to go with them. Especially being a PI, she can easily insert trouble with the way her mind works.The story moved along at a nice pace. It is filled with quirky, fun characters. I especially liked Whitney. She is the kind of friend that we all need to have. The superstitions that Tess had about not doing anything for the baby like buying furniture, having a baby shower, baby clothes, etc until the baby was born because it is bad luck gave me a laugh. We Italians have some strange superstitions as well so that was easy to relate to.This is a nice book for a weekend read when you want a mystery but not something heavy and gory. It keeps you guessing and I was quite surprised by the end.more
I've read other Laura Lippman books (novels and short story collections), and usually love them. I've been meaning to start reading her Tess Monaghan collection. But it was a mistake to start with this book. There's a mystery here, but it is overshadowed by the interactions of the main characters. These interactions would probably be very entertaining if I already knew and loved the characters. But without the backstory, it really didn't grab me.more
I'm pretty sure I found a new literary friend. She has moxie, a good sense a humor, animals love her, and trouble finds her wherever she goes, even when she is bedridden with a high risk pregnancy. Her name is Tess Monaghan and she is one of Baltimore's finest private detectives. I found Tess engaging. I was definitely interested in getting to know her, to find out what path she took that lead her to become a private investigator. I enjoyed the zany cast of characters with my favorite being Mrs. Blossom, the unassuming, knitting master spy. I lost count of how many times I burst out laughing during this novella. Ms. Lippman has a great writing style, direct without being pedestrian. There were two facets I found troubling. The first was that although I had a Why the face? moment, the ending seemed rushed. I really dislike when that happens. The second was, coming into an already established story, she left me feeling a bit like an outsider looking in on family and friends that held a tight bond. However she did succeed in peaking my interest. And now that my appetite is whet, I really have no choice but to start at the beginning and find out more about my new friend Tess and her family and kooky friends.more
This is the eleventh and final [so far!] book of the Tess Monaghan detective series. The author, Laura Lippman, is obviously a movie buff as her other books reveal, and this book is a knock-off of the 1954 Hitchcock classic, "Rear Window."Tess, a private detective with her own business, is now 35. She isn’t used to being inactive, but is temporarily confined to bed rest because of a high-risk pregnancy. She lives with her boyfriend Crow, who is “alarmingly in touch with his inner Martha Stewart.” Crow outfits Tess with all she might need to combat her frustration and crabbiness over her confinement, including a pair of binoculars so she can watch the neighbors at the dog park. Before long she notices that a dog has been abandoned, a dog previously walked by a woman in a green raincoat. She suspects foul play, and sends Crow along with her best friend Whitney to investigate.As Tess does what research she can on the computer about the missing woman, she also worries about what aspect of herself might go missing when the baby arrives. How will she balance being a mother with having a dangerous, demanding job that she really loves? Moreover, Crow hasn’t said anything about getting married; doesn’t he want to? It’s all making her a wreck. Evaluation: This is more like a novella than a book, and isn’t Lippman at her finest. Nevertheless, it is a must for fans of Tess Monaghan, because of the life-changing situation in which she now finds herself. In addition, other regular characters weigh in with Tess on love, marriage, and parenthood, and this gives us valuable and often touching insights into their lives as well as Tess’s.Tess Monaghan Series in Order:Baltimore Blues (1997)Charm City (1997)Butchers Hill (1998)In Big Trouble (1999)The Sugar House (2000)In a Strange City (2001)The Last Place (2002)By A Spider's Thread (2004)No Good Deeds (2006)Another Thing to Fall (2008) The Girl in the Green Raincoat (2011)more
The Girl in the Green Raincoat, Laura Lippman’s eleventh Tess Monaghan novel, was originally published as a serial in the New York Times Magazine. Since I only became acquainted with Lippman’s work beginning with 2007’s standalone novel, What the Dead Know, other than a short story or two, this is my first experience with Ms. Monaghan – and I seem to be catching her at a bad time.Tess, because of preeclampsia, is ordered to spend the last two months of her pregnancy on extended bed rest. In a takeoff on Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, Lippman has Tess move her bed out to her winterized sun porch for the duration of the pregnancy. There, armed with a trusty pair of binoculars, Tess begins to study the dog-walkers who use the little park across the street from her house. One walker, in particular, catches her eye - a green-raincoat-wearing blonde whose Italian greyhound always wears a matching green slicker on their walks.When, one afternoon, Tess sees the dog sprinting through the park on its own, she fully expects to find the woman in the green raincoat running behind in a desperate attempt to catch up with her freedom-seeking pooch. But this does not happen and, when neither the woman, nor the dog, has been seen for another day or so, Tess begins to suspect that something is very wrong. So, as a means to avoid going totally stir-crazy on her sun porch, Tess decides to put her detective skills and experience to good use by tracking down the woman in the green raincoat to make sure that nothing has happened to her. Luckily for Tess, she has a crew-of-four willing to do for her what she cannot accomplish from the confines of her little makeshift bedroom: Crow, her boyfriend and father of the baby holding her prisoner; Whitney Talbot, Tess’s best friend; crackerjack researcher Dorie Starnes; and a most unusual private investigator, Mrs. Blossom. As Tess grows more and more concerned about the missing woman’s fate, she will manage (much in the tradition of Rear Window) to move the investigation in a direction that places her sun porch in the middle of all the action.The Girl in the Green Raincoat will work best for readers already at least a little familiar with the repeat characters from previous Tess Monaghan novels. This one is very short, at just over 150 pages, and is probably best characterized as a novella rather than a novel. That does not leave much room for character development in a plot that features such a large supporting cast. Motivations, relationships, and personal histories that can only be guessed at by new readers are likely to be perfectly clear to Tess Monaghan veterans for whom the backstory is certain to be a significant part of the fun of The Girl in the Green Raincoat. This is not a good spot at which to jump into the Tess Monaghan series.Rated at: 3.5more
This novel was originally done as an installment series for the newspaper, and has now been published as a book. This features the private investigator, Tess Monaghan, in a Baltimore, Maryland setting. The story closely resembles Hitchcock's The Rear Window with a pregnant Tess unable to leave the house. The story also features dialogue from The Bad Seed. Lippman does an excellent job of incorporating this feeling of suspense and hopelessness into her story. Of course, pregnant Tess fights jealousy and insecurity as her body adjusts to this alien within her body. The other characters seem minor in comparison to Tess in this book, as Tess struggles to understand the changes that will soon happen.more
I seem to be on a Laura Lippman kick lately. This book is actually a novella, a 158 page fun read that is quite unusual for Lippman even though it is a part of the Tess Monaghan series. My copy says "available for the first time in book form."The story begins with a very pregnant Tess confined to a chaise lounge in her sunroom by a diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and a close call with a miscarriage. Baby Daddy Crow is happily doing his best imitation of Martha Stewart, cooking and keeping house, while harping at Tess to "stay put" and not to work. Since she is fascinated by the people walking their dogs in the park next to her house, he brings her binoculars and she does her imitation of "Rear Window."Every day a young woman in a celery green raincoat walks an Italian greyhound wearing an identically colored raincoat. The woman talks on a cell phone constantly while the dog prances in front of her and for some reason Tess finds them interesting. Then one evening the dog runs back out by itself and Tess never sees the woman again. Certain something terrible has happened to her, Tess sets out to solve the mystery - to Crow''s horror.Tess' new employee Mrs. Blossom who resembles her name and best friend Whitney help in the investigation. As she gets involved, her house begins to take on a Grand Central Station atmosphere, and since she must leave the door unlocked (Crow would kill her if she got up to answer it), she's wide open to danger. I was fooled by the story, but then I was a little busy laughing at the characters and the antics of the dogs, hers plus the little greyhound, and I kept hoping she wouldn't lose the baby. Want to know how it all came out? You'll just have to read this charming little novella for yourself.more
This novella marked the long-awaited return of Tess Monaghan - sweet!At the beginning of the book, we find out that she's in her third trimester and on strict bedrest. The normally very active PI (she's usually rowing on the rivers of Baltimore) begins to entertain herself by doing some people watching. Conveniently, there's a park across the way where people walk their dogs, take their lunch, etc. She soon notices that there's a woman in a green raincoat who walks a dog every day at the same time. One day, she notices that the dog is running loose, but the titular girl in the green raincoat is not with him.Tess is convinced that something is amiss, but from her bed, there is only so much she can do. With much cajoling, she enlists the help of her partner Crow and her best friend Whitney. The investigation soon turns up a suspect (the husband, who has a string of dead wives).The subplot about the kid who Crow and Tess have taken under their wing is equal parts amusing and interesting. He's dating someone and - wow, is he fumbling! Imagine Tess' surprise when the mothers of the love interest come calling.This was a great read, albeit too short. I was really excited when I heard a new Tess work was in the works, but I was really disappointed when I found out it was a novella. Apparently it originally appeared as a series and was then culled into a novella. I'm also a disappointed because the end seems to spell a turning point for Tess and Crow that I'm not quite pleased by, although some others might be.more
A modern day Rear Window knock off, this novel finds Tess hugely pregnant, on mandatory bed rest, and bored to death. When she asks her boyfriend to get her some binoculars, Tess thinks she uncovers a murder when she spies on the activities of the dog park visible from her bed.A very skillful and entertaining writer, Laura Lippman thoroughly entertained me. I found myself frustrated at Tess's selfishness of her condition--most women would be more concerned about her baby's welfare instead of her own personal inconvenience. But that is somewhat in character with Tess anyway, so while it is annoying, it does not ruin the story.more
I loved this book. I've never read Laura Lippman and now plan to start the Tess Monaghan series from the start.more
If you've seen Hitchcock's "Rear Window" and appreciated his stunning work, you'll love The Girl in the Green Raincoat. Similar to the movie, this book deals with a woman who must be content spending her time watching other people through a window. Tess watches the mundane events that occurs outside, until one day something changes. When she thinks that something is amiss, she does everything in her power to solve the mystery from behind closed doors. Little does she know what she is in store for!At a little under 200 pages, I was a little concerned when this book first arrived. I was wondering how Laura Lippman could fit an intriguing mystery in such a small amount of pages. Let's just say, I shouldn't have worried! It is a quick read for sure, but in the best way possible. The pages just flew by as I devoured Tess' character, her worries, her investigation, and everything else that was wrapped up in this wonderfully written mystery. The prose in this story is also fantastically witty. There were times I laughed out loud at her inner musings. By the time I got to the ending, which was perfection, I was sad that the book was over. Now that I know this is part of a series I'm going to have to go and find the others!The characters are wonderfully developed, from the main character to the most supporting character. Tess, our protagonist, is a an independent woman that has to come to terms with allowing others to do things for her. She is used to holding her own as a detective and is suddenly having to depend on others to do the legwork for her, which maddens her. I loved her tenacity, and even though she has worries about her boyfriend Crow she is always looking at things from a logical point of view. Tess is a woman's woman if I do say so myself!This is the first time I've ever read one of Laura Lippman's books, despite her NYT Bestsellers fame. I'm glad that this book was offered to me and put this fantastic series on my radar! Overall, The Girl in the Green Raincoat is a superbly written novel with witty dialogue, well written characters, and a thrilling plot that doesn't disappoint. All you mystery fans out there need to go pick up a copy as soon as possible!more
Tess Monahan is pregnant and confined to bed rest by the window where she sees a young woman wearing a green raincoat walking a dog wearing a matching green raincoat everyday. One day the dog is running around the park minus it's owner. Tess is convinced that something has happened to the woman and gets her friends to investigate. The author readily admits that she used Hitchcock's movie "Rear Window" as an idea for this story.more
First Line: "I am being held hostage," Tess Monaghan whispered into her iPhone.In this eleventh outing for Baltimore private investigator Tess Monaghan, she is in the third trimester of her pregnancy and forced to endure bed rest. During the day she is ensconced on a chaise longue on her sun porch, and in homage to one of my favorite books (The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey) and one of my favorite movies (Hitchcock's Rear Window), Tess finds herself paying more attention to the people in the park across the street than she does the books, magazines and DVDs she has at hand.In particular she pays attention to one pretty woman and her dog, both of whom are dressed alike in green raincoats. One day the woman and her dog arrive for their walk and only the dog comes back. The woman has disappeared. Tess knows something's wrong, but since she can't investigate she must enlist the aide of friends and employees like Dorie and Mrs. Blossom. It's a good thing Tess is lying down because she's just opened a big can of worms.I only made Tess's acquaintance in December, reading the first book in the series, Baltimore Blues. Even though I'm usually a stickler for reading series books in order, I couldn't resist this one. Was I confused by the nine unread books in between? Not really, because Lippman is a pro at giving the reader enough information not to feel lost. It's obvious to me that plenty has happened in Tess's life in those nine books, and reading The Girl in the Green Raincoat has whetted my appetite to go back and fill in the blanks.This is short and fast and thoroughly enjoyable. I loved the conversations Tess would have with her unborn child (whom she usually referred to as "Fifi"): "Don't ever settle, Fifi. Don't get married just because it's still marketed as the ultimate achievement for women. On the other hand, learn to value men for something other than their paychecks."Very wise words, Fifi. You'd do well to listen to them. If you're a fan of Tess's-- or even if you're not-- The Girl in the Green Raincoat is one fine mystery.more
What should have been a quick read for me seemed to drag a little bit. After seeing the previous reviews, I expected to read this in a couple of hours but for some reason, I kept having to go back and check who was who and my mind kept wandering off. Once on track, the "rear window like " story came together.more
Private investigator Tess Monaghan must stay in bed because of her pregnancy so she occupies her time by watching the world go by outside her window. She sees a young woman in a green raincoat walk her dog at the same time every day. Then one day she see the dog running free and the woman is nowhere to be seen. Tess decides to to investigate the woman's disappearance from her bed.The book is a little like the movie Rear window but is still a great read.more
I'm a big fan of Laura Lippman. I've enjoyed her last two books which were stand alones, but I was thrilled to see that The Girl in the Green Raincoat featured her recurring character - PI Tess Monaghan.The Girl in the Green Raincoat finds Tess exactly where she doesn't want to be - sitting still. And for a very good reason. She's in the last trimester of a difficult pregnancy. Camped out in the sun room of her home, she whiles away the time watching out the window at the local dog park. She becomes fascinated by a woman who arrives at the same time every day in a green raincoat with her greyhound. Until the day when it's just the dog - trailing his leash...Unable to get up and out herself, Tess sends her partner Crow to corral the dog. What seemed like a simple search and rescue to return a lost dog turns intosomething more. Attempts to find the girl in the green raincoat leads to a trail of crimes that Tess slowly pieces together from her bedroom. Think Rear Window.This novella originally appeared serialized in the New York Times two years go. Once I discovered this, it explained why each chapter seemed to have a little story within the story. We get extra glimpses into the character's lives. Tess's doubts about her relationship and impending motherhood make the character even more realistic. I have always enjoyed the character of Whitney, Tess's best friend - we get to see some of her emotional make up this time around. I can't wait to see more about Mrs. Blossom, who is running the agency while Tess is laid up - she is a character just waiting to be fleshed out. Lippman's characters are engaging, the plots believable and the dialogue witty - I love the way Tess's mind works.For fans of Tess this is a must. I can't wait to see where Lippman takes the storyline next. For those new to this series, you may want to start with an earlier book to get a sense of the characters and the background. Now that's not to say you wouldn't enjoy this easy, one sitting read - you definitely will - but I know you'll be hunting down the rest of the series!more
This light mystery novella is a far cry from Lippman's wonderful What the Dead Know which is truly unfortunate. Though the parallels with Rear Window are immediately obvious, this book had none of the suspense or thrill of the original. The plot could easily have been worked into a full length novel which would have given Lippman a chance to flesh out these characters enough to pull in the reader; as it was, I couldn't share Tess' obsession with the missing woman nor understand how or why Lloyd and May fit into things. The book was just too short in my opinion to pull me in; I finished it in just under two hours with no sense of satisfaction. 3 stars because the writing as always was good, there just wasn't enough of it.more
You would be correct in thinking that this story is reminiscent of Hitchcock’s Rear Window. I loved that film – one of my favorites.However, this story is not in any way a re-working or an attempt to duplicate what the great director created. Not that this is bad, but I’d hate to give a potential reader the wrong impression.Fans of Lippman will love this light and quick read. Avid mystery readers might find it a bit less meaty than what they’re used to. At least I did. This is not a detriment to the author’s work here.The Girl in the Green Raincoat is a perfect book for someone looking for an enjoyable weekend read. I like those. I like picking a book off my shelf that I know will allow me to sit, relax, snuggle up to the cats and a cup of cocoa and let the story take over.I’ve never read Lippman and so I know nothing about her character Tess Monaghan. This was my introduction and I quite liked her. Her quick wit and banter are refreshing and far from obnoxious or overbearing. Never did a quip fall on a wrong note.At a little over two hundred pages, the ending comes quickly and my only complaint is that I was left with the sense there could have been a chapter or two more so I didn’t feel “rushed”. That maybe there was some kind of requirement to get it all done within those pages so when it got close, the story had to come together in a curt fashion.That being said, I liked The Girl In The Green Raincoat, and I’ve put Lippman on my list of authors whose books I want to read more of. Definitely.more
I hadn't read any Laura Lippman books since "Sugar House", but had no trouble stepping into the world of Tess Monaghan. This was a quick easy read and I enjoyed the nod to "Rear Window". There was a bit of confusion in the middle - who was married to who and when - but that could have been solved quickly with a paper copy instead of Kindle, which is a little harder to flip through. I enjoyed it so much I want to go back and read the ones I missed, plus her newest.more
A novella featuring one of my favorite private sleuths, Tess Monagham of my hometown, Baltimore MD.  In this one we find Tess pregnant, confined to total bedrest, and absolutely unhappy about life in general, lack of wine, lack of sleep, lousy food, and not being able to stick her nose into everything she's used to doing.  As she stares out the window each day, she notices a Girl in a Green Raincoat walking a greyhound, and becomes fixated on her.  When this mysterious green lady doesn't show up, and the dog is running loose, Tess' fertile mind spins all kinds of scenarios.In a story reminiscent of the Hitchcock thriller Rear Window, and the Josephine Tey story Daughter of Time, Tess sets out to solve the mystery, directing her minions from her sickbed.  The ending is spectacular, surprising and edifying.  It's a quick read--originally published as a serial in the New Yorker.more
I found “The Girl in the Green Raincoat” interesting enough…but couldn’t get away from the main problem I had with the mystery. I understand that the main character, Tess Monaghan, is very interested in where the title character has gone – but the reader is only given 7 (maybe 8) paragraphs in which to become interested as well – and it just didn’t work for me.I understand that this book had been serialized – and maybe that’s why the content feels so light – but I was just shocked that a book that compares itself to “Rear Window” (one of my favorite movies) – gives the reader so little to view of the woman who becomes the center of the mystery. This brief glimpse makes her easy to forget and even easier to care little about.I would say what kept me going was the fact that Tess suffers from pre-eclampsia during her pregnancy, as I did, yet even that seemed light in substance.I think there was a good idea here, and had it been fleshed out more, could have been a good book. There just wasn’t enough substance to make me care much about what was happening or to really draw me into the plot.more
I've never read a book by Laura Lippman. I'm not sure why I haven't (although it could have something to do with my recent falling out of love with the mystery genre), but I've seen her name around the book blogging community and when I saw this offering on the NetGalley site, and noticed that it was under 200 pages long I figured I'd give it a go.The Girl in the Green Raincoat is the eleventh Tess Monaghan story, but in spite of not knowing Tess at all, I found myself easily getting my bearings and figuring out who was who fairly quickly. I felt sympathy for Tess and her bedridden state, although I had a harder time understanding just why she seemed to feel resentment toward her unborn daughter. I admit to snorting with laughter at the opening few pages of the book and, as a result, easily understanding the relationship between Tess and Whitney. The mystery was okay, with a nice twist thrown in that, while not completely unseen, still gave me a few details that I hadn't thought of.I do have one nit-picky thing to say though. The raincoat that plays so prominently in this story is described in the book as being "celery green". The book on the cover is definitely not "celery green", being more of an emerald color. It was that very color that drew my eye to the book in the first place, so to have it be described in the book as more of a celery color got to me (probably more than it should have). Such an easy thing to fix - I wonder why it was done that way.more
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Reviews

Tess Monaghan, the full time private detective and part-time control freak, is put on bed rest prior to the birth of her first child. Tess is not one to sit around, and with only Judge Judy and Oprah for companions, she believes she is destined to lose her mind. Unable to find much to do but watch people out the window, Tess notices a young lady walking her dog every day at the same time. The girl's dog wears a matching green raincoat, which leads Tess to speculate about the woman and who she is talking to on her cell phone every afternoon. Until one day, the dog with the raincoat comes running across the park dragging his leash and the girl is nowhere to be found. Tess is, of course, unable to let this go and becomes concerned about the fate of the young woman, who doesn't return to the park with her dog after that day. Alas, Tess pulls in her friends and fellow private detectives to figure out who the girl is and what might have happened to her. In the process, Tess finds herself in danger, as an extremely pregnant woman on bedrest can do little to protect herself from potential threat...This was a very quick read and fairly entertaining. Tess is driven and witty and the story moved along at a good and suspenseful pace. Though somewhat predictable, I enjoyed the story, which takes a twist from the typical private detective storyline.more
Enjoyable, light mystery in a series I haven't tried before. I would read more.more
Laura Lippman's slender mystery "The Girl in the Green Raincoat," first published in the New York Times Sunday Magazine, has a lot of "Rear Window" in it. And like the Hitchcock movie classic, this story is a winner.Tess Monaghan, the private investigator featured in several of Lippman's novels, is about eight months into a difficult (and unplanned) pregnancy. Other than trips between her bed and her bathroom, she is confined virtually to one spot. That spot gives her a view of the street, where she often notices a young woman in a green raincoat walking her dog. One day, Tess sees the dog, but not the woman.After a few days pass without noticing the woman walk past, and with nothing better to do, Tess does some checking using her phone, her computer and her friends. She learns that the missing woman's husband has had two wives and one girlfriend die under peculiar circumstances.Whitney, Tess's attractive friend, gets the Grace Kelly role in this story. She is sent to meet Don Epstein, the husband, and to try to get some information out of him while pretending to be a vulnerable woman with few close friends or family members, the kind of woman he seems to be drawn to. Things soon get tense for Whitney and, later, for Tess herself.This slender mystery offers an abundance of wit, romance and, eventually, excitement. It also provides one of the most unexpectedly poignant lines one is likely to find in a mystery story. After she survives her ordeal, Tess, who has been anxious about what changes her baby will mean for her life and her career, begins to view things differently. She recalls that she has known since early girlhood where babies come from. "Now, at thirty-five, in despair over her lack of maternal instincts, she had finally learned where mothers come from."Fans of Lippman's series will be interested to find out what now awaits this private investigator/mommy.more
I would not consider this book a great work of literature but I enjoyed it so much and it filled such a hole in me that I had to give it 5 stars.A comfy, cosy mystery with the very pregnant Tess bedridden in her last trimester and spending her days on her sun porch watching the world outside. Each day she waits and watches for those who daily walk their dogs past her windows. And each day she sees an attractive young lady in a green raincoat, green pumps, with a green umbrella walking a dog in a matching green raincoat. One day she sees the little dog go running by with his green leash flying behind him. Even though she is bedridden she must find out what has happened to the little dog's owner. A truly enjoyable book. Just right for those rough patches in one's R/L.Recommended but book 12 out of a series of 13. I need to go back and find the 1st.more
This cozy mystery novella is sure to entertain fans of Laura Lippman. Just don’t jump to conclusions! Parts of the plot may have a familiar ring to them, but don’t assume the clues lead to a similar conclusion. Sometimes, curiosity that is meant to help does everything but help. You should know who really does need saving before making the attempt, or it might just be you who is in need of rescuing!more
Originally serialized in the New York Times, this novella is a quick fun read and a good plot, and great characters. It's worth reading for the witty commentary alone.more
The Girl in the Green Raincoat was a fun book. I don't think I have read any other mysteries featuring Tess but she did seem familiar so maybe I have. HmmmmmmmmI felt for Tess who was on "bed rest" because of a high risk pregnancy. I went through that myself when I was pregnant with my boys and it's not fun. It was easy to see how she watched people out of her window and made up stories to go with them. Especially being a PI, she can easily insert trouble with the way her mind works.The story moved along at a nice pace. It is filled with quirky, fun characters. I especially liked Whitney. She is the kind of friend that we all need to have. The superstitions that Tess had about not doing anything for the baby like buying furniture, having a baby shower, baby clothes, etc until the baby was born because it is bad luck gave me a laugh. We Italians have some strange superstitions as well so that was easy to relate to.This is a nice book for a weekend read when you want a mystery but not something heavy and gory. It keeps you guessing and I was quite surprised by the end.more
I've read other Laura Lippman books (novels and short story collections), and usually love them. I've been meaning to start reading her Tess Monaghan collection. But it was a mistake to start with this book. There's a mystery here, but it is overshadowed by the interactions of the main characters. These interactions would probably be very entertaining if I already knew and loved the characters. But without the backstory, it really didn't grab me.more
I'm pretty sure I found a new literary friend. She has moxie, a good sense a humor, animals love her, and trouble finds her wherever she goes, even when she is bedridden with a high risk pregnancy. Her name is Tess Monaghan and she is one of Baltimore's finest private detectives. I found Tess engaging. I was definitely interested in getting to know her, to find out what path she took that lead her to become a private investigator. I enjoyed the zany cast of characters with my favorite being Mrs. Blossom, the unassuming, knitting master spy. I lost count of how many times I burst out laughing during this novella. Ms. Lippman has a great writing style, direct without being pedestrian. There were two facets I found troubling. The first was that although I had a Why the face? moment, the ending seemed rushed. I really dislike when that happens. The second was, coming into an already established story, she left me feeling a bit like an outsider looking in on family and friends that held a tight bond. However she did succeed in peaking my interest. And now that my appetite is whet, I really have no choice but to start at the beginning and find out more about my new friend Tess and her family and kooky friends.more
This is the eleventh and final [so far!] book of the Tess Monaghan detective series. The author, Laura Lippman, is obviously a movie buff as her other books reveal, and this book is a knock-off of the 1954 Hitchcock classic, "Rear Window."Tess, a private detective with her own business, is now 35. She isn’t used to being inactive, but is temporarily confined to bed rest because of a high-risk pregnancy. She lives with her boyfriend Crow, who is “alarmingly in touch with his inner Martha Stewart.” Crow outfits Tess with all she might need to combat her frustration and crabbiness over her confinement, including a pair of binoculars so she can watch the neighbors at the dog park. Before long she notices that a dog has been abandoned, a dog previously walked by a woman in a green raincoat. She suspects foul play, and sends Crow along with her best friend Whitney to investigate.As Tess does what research she can on the computer about the missing woman, she also worries about what aspect of herself might go missing when the baby arrives. How will she balance being a mother with having a dangerous, demanding job that she really loves? Moreover, Crow hasn’t said anything about getting married; doesn’t he want to? It’s all making her a wreck. Evaluation: This is more like a novella than a book, and isn’t Lippman at her finest. Nevertheless, it is a must for fans of Tess Monaghan, because of the life-changing situation in which she now finds herself. In addition, other regular characters weigh in with Tess on love, marriage, and parenthood, and this gives us valuable and often touching insights into their lives as well as Tess’s.Tess Monaghan Series in Order:Baltimore Blues (1997)Charm City (1997)Butchers Hill (1998)In Big Trouble (1999)The Sugar House (2000)In a Strange City (2001)The Last Place (2002)By A Spider's Thread (2004)No Good Deeds (2006)Another Thing to Fall (2008) The Girl in the Green Raincoat (2011)more
The Girl in the Green Raincoat, Laura Lippman’s eleventh Tess Monaghan novel, was originally published as a serial in the New York Times Magazine. Since I only became acquainted with Lippman’s work beginning with 2007’s standalone novel, What the Dead Know, other than a short story or two, this is my first experience with Ms. Monaghan – and I seem to be catching her at a bad time.Tess, because of preeclampsia, is ordered to spend the last two months of her pregnancy on extended bed rest. In a takeoff on Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, Lippman has Tess move her bed out to her winterized sun porch for the duration of the pregnancy. There, armed with a trusty pair of binoculars, Tess begins to study the dog-walkers who use the little park across the street from her house. One walker, in particular, catches her eye - a green-raincoat-wearing blonde whose Italian greyhound always wears a matching green slicker on their walks.When, one afternoon, Tess sees the dog sprinting through the park on its own, she fully expects to find the woman in the green raincoat running behind in a desperate attempt to catch up with her freedom-seeking pooch. But this does not happen and, when neither the woman, nor the dog, has been seen for another day or so, Tess begins to suspect that something is very wrong. So, as a means to avoid going totally stir-crazy on her sun porch, Tess decides to put her detective skills and experience to good use by tracking down the woman in the green raincoat to make sure that nothing has happened to her. Luckily for Tess, she has a crew-of-four willing to do for her what she cannot accomplish from the confines of her little makeshift bedroom: Crow, her boyfriend and father of the baby holding her prisoner; Whitney Talbot, Tess’s best friend; crackerjack researcher Dorie Starnes; and a most unusual private investigator, Mrs. Blossom. As Tess grows more and more concerned about the missing woman’s fate, she will manage (much in the tradition of Rear Window) to move the investigation in a direction that places her sun porch in the middle of all the action.The Girl in the Green Raincoat will work best for readers already at least a little familiar with the repeat characters from previous Tess Monaghan novels. This one is very short, at just over 150 pages, and is probably best characterized as a novella rather than a novel. That does not leave much room for character development in a plot that features such a large supporting cast. Motivations, relationships, and personal histories that can only be guessed at by new readers are likely to be perfectly clear to Tess Monaghan veterans for whom the backstory is certain to be a significant part of the fun of The Girl in the Green Raincoat. This is not a good spot at which to jump into the Tess Monaghan series.Rated at: 3.5more
This novel was originally done as an installment series for the newspaper, and has now been published as a book. This features the private investigator, Tess Monaghan, in a Baltimore, Maryland setting. The story closely resembles Hitchcock's The Rear Window with a pregnant Tess unable to leave the house. The story also features dialogue from The Bad Seed. Lippman does an excellent job of incorporating this feeling of suspense and hopelessness into her story. Of course, pregnant Tess fights jealousy and insecurity as her body adjusts to this alien within her body. The other characters seem minor in comparison to Tess in this book, as Tess struggles to understand the changes that will soon happen.more
I seem to be on a Laura Lippman kick lately. This book is actually a novella, a 158 page fun read that is quite unusual for Lippman even though it is a part of the Tess Monaghan series. My copy says "available for the first time in book form."The story begins with a very pregnant Tess confined to a chaise lounge in her sunroom by a diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and a close call with a miscarriage. Baby Daddy Crow is happily doing his best imitation of Martha Stewart, cooking and keeping house, while harping at Tess to "stay put" and not to work. Since she is fascinated by the people walking their dogs in the park next to her house, he brings her binoculars and she does her imitation of "Rear Window."Every day a young woman in a celery green raincoat walks an Italian greyhound wearing an identically colored raincoat. The woman talks on a cell phone constantly while the dog prances in front of her and for some reason Tess finds them interesting. Then one evening the dog runs back out by itself and Tess never sees the woman again. Certain something terrible has happened to her, Tess sets out to solve the mystery - to Crow''s horror.Tess' new employee Mrs. Blossom who resembles her name and best friend Whitney help in the investigation. As she gets involved, her house begins to take on a Grand Central Station atmosphere, and since she must leave the door unlocked (Crow would kill her if she got up to answer it), she's wide open to danger. I was fooled by the story, but then I was a little busy laughing at the characters and the antics of the dogs, hers plus the little greyhound, and I kept hoping she wouldn't lose the baby. Want to know how it all came out? You'll just have to read this charming little novella for yourself.more
This novella marked the long-awaited return of Tess Monaghan - sweet!At the beginning of the book, we find out that she's in her third trimester and on strict bedrest. The normally very active PI (she's usually rowing on the rivers of Baltimore) begins to entertain herself by doing some people watching. Conveniently, there's a park across the way where people walk their dogs, take their lunch, etc. She soon notices that there's a woman in a green raincoat who walks a dog every day at the same time. One day, she notices that the dog is running loose, but the titular girl in the green raincoat is not with him.Tess is convinced that something is amiss, but from her bed, there is only so much she can do. With much cajoling, she enlists the help of her partner Crow and her best friend Whitney. The investigation soon turns up a suspect (the husband, who has a string of dead wives).The subplot about the kid who Crow and Tess have taken under their wing is equal parts amusing and interesting. He's dating someone and - wow, is he fumbling! Imagine Tess' surprise when the mothers of the love interest come calling.This was a great read, albeit too short. I was really excited when I heard a new Tess work was in the works, but I was really disappointed when I found out it was a novella. Apparently it originally appeared as a series and was then culled into a novella. I'm also a disappointed because the end seems to spell a turning point for Tess and Crow that I'm not quite pleased by, although some others might be.more
A modern day Rear Window knock off, this novel finds Tess hugely pregnant, on mandatory bed rest, and bored to death. When she asks her boyfriend to get her some binoculars, Tess thinks she uncovers a murder when she spies on the activities of the dog park visible from her bed.A very skillful and entertaining writer, Laura Lippman thoroughly entertained me. I found myself frustrated at Tess's selfishness of her condition--most women would be more concerned about her baby's welfare instead of her own personal inconvenience. But that is somewhat in character with Tess anyway, so while it is annoying, it does not ruin the story.more
I loved this book. I've never read Laura Lippman and now plan to start the Tess Monaghan series from the start.more
If you've seen Hitchcock's "Rear Window" and appreciated his stunning work, you'll love The Girl in the Green Raincoat. Similar to the movie, this book deals with a woman who must be content spending her time watching other people through a window. Tess watches the mundane events that occurs outside, until one day something changes. When she thinks that something is amiss, she does everything in her power to solve the mystery from behind closed doors. Little does she know what she is in store for!At a little under 200 pages, I was a little concerned when this book first arrived. I was wondering how Laura Lippman could fit an intriguing mystery in such a small amount of pages. Let's just say, I shouldn't have worried! It is a quick read for sure, but in the best way possible. The pages just flew by as I devoured Tess' character, her worries, her investigation, and everything else that was wrapped up in this wonderfully written mystery. The prose in this story is also fantastically witty. There were times I laughed out loud at her inner musings. By the time I got to the ending, which was perfection, I was sad that the book was over. Now that I know this is part of a series I'm going to have to go and find the others!The characters are wonderfully developed, from the main character to the most supporting character. Tess, our protagonist, is a an independent woman that has to come to terms with allowing others to do things for her. She is used to holding her own as a detective and is suddenly having to depend on others to do the legwork for her, which maddens her. I loved her tenacity, and even though she has worries about her boyfriend Crow she is always looking at things from a logical point of view. Tess is a woman's woman if I do say so myself!This is the first time I've ever read one of Laura Lippman's books, despite her NYT Bestsellers fame. I'm glad that this book was offered to me and put this fantastic series on my radar! Overall, The Girl in the Green Raincoat is a superbly written novel with witty dialogue, well written characters, and a thrilling plot that doesn't disappoint. All you mystery fans out there need to go pick up a copy as soon as possible!more
Tess Monahan is pregnant and confined to bed rest by the window where she sees a young woman wearing a green raincoat walking a dog wearing a matching green raincoat everyday. One day the dog is running around the park minus it's owner. Tess is convinced that something has happened to the woman and gets her friends to investigate. The author readily admits that she used Hitchcock's movie "Rear Window" as an idea for this story.more
First Line: "I am being held hostage," Tess Monaghan whispered into her iPhone.In this eleventh outing for Baltimore private investigator Tess Monaghan, she is in the third trimester of her pregnancy and forced to endure bed rest. During the day she is ensconced on a chaise longue on her sun porch, and in homage to one of my favorite books (The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey) and one of my favorite movies (Hitchcock's Rear Window), Tess finds herself paying more attention to the people in the park across the street than she does the books, magazines and DVDs she has at hand.In particular she pays attention to one pretty woman and her dog, both of whom are dressed alike in green raincoats. One day the woman and her dog arrive for their walk and only the dog comes back. The woman has disappeared. Tess knows something's wrong, but since she can't investigate she must enlist the aide of friends and employees like Dorie and Mrs. Blossom. It's a good thing Tess is lying down because she's just opened a big can of worms.I only made Tess's acquaintance in December, reading the first book in the series, Baltimore Blues. Even though I'm usually a stickler for reading series books in order, I couldn't resist this one. Was I confused by the nine unread books in between? Not really, because Lippman is a pro at giving the reader enough information not to feel lost. It's obvious to me that plenty has happened in Tess's life in those nine books, and reading The Girl in the Green Raincoat has whetted my appetite to go back and fill in the blanks.This is short and fast and thoroughly enjoyable. I loved the conversations Tess would have with her unborn child (whom she usually referred to as "Fifi"): "Don't ever settle, Fifi. Don't get married just because it's still marketed as the ultimate achievement for women. On the other hand, learn to value men for something other than their paychecks."Very wise words, Fifi. You'd do well to listen to them. If you're a fan of Tess's-- or even if you're not-- The Girl in the Green Raincoat is one fine mystery.more
What should have been a quick read for me seemed to drag a little bit. After seeing the previous reviews, I expected to read this in a couple of hours but for some reason, I kept having to go back and check who was who and my mind kept wandering off. Once on track, the "rear window like " story came together.more
Private investigator Tess Monaghan must stay in bed because of her pregnancy so she occupies her time by watching the world go by outside her window. She sees a young woman in a green raincoat walk her dog at the same time every day. Then one day she see the dog running free and the woman is nowhere to be seen. Tess decides to to investigate the woman's disappearance from her bed.The book is a little like the movie Rear window but is still a great read.more
I'm a big fan of Laura Lippman. I've enjoyed her last two books which were stand alones, but I was thrilled to see that The Girl in the Green Raincoat featured her recurring character - PI Tess Monaghan.The Girl in the Green Raincoat finds Tess exactly where she doesn't want to be - sitting still. And for a very good reason. She's in the last trimester of a difficult pregnancy. Camped out in the sun room of her home, she whiles away the time watching out the window at the local dog park. She becomes fascinated by a woman who arrives at the same time every day in a green raincoat with her greyhound. Until the day when it's just the dog - trailing his leash...Unable to get up and out herself, Tess sends her partner Crow to corral the dog. What seemed like a simple search and rescue to return a lost dog turns intosomething more. Attempts to find the girl in the green raincoat leads to a trail of crimes that Tess slowly pieces together from her bedroom. Think Rear Window.This novella originally appeared serialized in the New York Times two years go. Once I discovered this, it explained why each chapter seemed to have a little story within the story. We get extra glimpses into the character's lives. Tess's doubts about her relationship and impending motherhood make the character even more realistic. I have always enjoyed the character of Whitney, Tess's best friend - we get to see some of her emotional make up this time around. I can't wait to see more about Mrs. Blossom, who is running the agency while Tess is laid up - she is a character just waiting to be fleshed out. Lippman's characters are engaging, the plots believable and the dialogue witty - I love the way Tess's mind works.For fans of Tess this is a must. I can't wait to see where Lippman takes the storyline next. For those new to this series, you may want to start with an earlier book to get a sense of the characters and the background. Now that's not to say you wouldn't enjoy this easy, one sitting read - you definitely will - but I know you'll be hunting down the rest of the series!more
This light mystery novella is a far cry from Lippman's wonderful What the Dead Know which is truly unfortunate. Though the parallels with Rear Window are immediately obvious, this book had none of the suspense or thrill of the original. The plot could easily have been worked into a full length novel which would have given Lippman a chance to flesh out these characters enough to pull in the reader; as it was, I couldn't share Tess' obsession with the missing woman nor understand how or why Lloyd and May fit into things. The book was just too short in my opinion to pull me in; I finished it in just under two hours with no sense of satisfaction. 3 stars because the writing as always was good, there just wasn't enough of it.more
You would be correct in thinking that this story is reminiscent of Hitchcock’s Rear Window. I loved that film – one of my favorites.However, this story is not in any way a re-working or an attempt to duplicate what the great director created. Not that this is bad, but I’d hate to give a potential reader the wrong impression.Fans of Lippman will love this light and quick read. Avid mystery readers might find it a bit less meaty than what they’re used to. At least I did. This is not a detriment to the author’s work here.The Girl in the Green Raincoat is a perfect book for someone looking for an enjoyable weekend read. I like those. I like picking a book off my shelf that I know will allow me to sit, relax, snuggle up to the cats and a cup of cocoa and let the story take over.I’ve never read Lippman and so I know nothing about her character Tess Monaghan. This was my introduction and I quite liked her. Her quick wit and banter are refreshing and far from obnoxious or overbearing. Never did a quip fall on a wrong note.At a little over two hundred pages, the ending comes quickly and my only complaint is that I was left with the sense there could have been a chapter or two more so I didn’t feel “rushed”. That maybe there was some kind of requirement to get it all done within those pages so when it got close, the story had to come together in a curt fashion.That being said, I liked The Girl In The Green Raincoat, and I’ve put Lippman on my list of authors whose books I want to read more of. Definitely.more
I hadn't read any Laura Lippman books since "Sugar House", but had no trouble stepping into the world of Tess Monaghan. This was a quick easy read and I enjoyed the nod to "Rear Window". There was a bit of confusion in the middle - who was married to who and when - but that could have been solved quickly with a paper copy instead of Kindle, which is a little harder to flip through. I enjoyed it so much I want to go back and read the ones I missed, plus her newest.more
A novella featuring one of my favorite private sleuths, Tess Monagham of my hometown, Baltimore MD.  In this one we find Tess pregnant, confined to total bedrest, and absolutely unhappy about life in general, lack of wine, lack of sleep, lousy food, and not being able to stick her nose into everything she's used to doing.  As she stares out the window each day, she notices a Girl in a Green Raincoat walking a greyhound, and becomes fixated on her.  When this mysterious green lady doesn't show up, and the dog is running loose, Tess' fertile mind spins all kinds of scenarios.In a story reminiscent of the Hitchcock thriller Rear Window, and the Josephine Tey story Daughter of Time, Tess sets out to solve the mystery, directing her minions from her sickbed.  The ending is spectacular, surprising and edifying.  It's a quick read--originally published as a serial in the New Yorker.more
I found “The Girl in the Green Raincoat” interesting enough…but couldn’t get away from the main problem I had with the mystery. I understand that the main character, Tess Monaghan, is very interested in where the title character has gone – but the reader is only given 7 (maybe 8) paragraphs in which to become interested as well – and it just didn’t work for me.I understand that this book had been serialized – and maybe that’s why the content feels so light – but I was just shocked that a book that compares itself to “Rear Window” (one of my favorite movies) – gives the reader so little to view of the woman who becomes the center of the mystery. This brief glimpse makes her easy to forget and even easier to care little about.I would say what kept me going was the fact that Tess suffers from pre-eclampsia during her pregnancy, as I did, yet even that seemed light in substance.I think there was a good idea here, and had it been fleshed out more, could have been a good book. There just wasn’t enough substance to make me care much about what was happening or to really draw me into the plot.more
I've never read a book by Laura Lippman. I'm not sure why I haven't (although it could have something to do with my recent falling out of love with the mystery genre), but I've seen her name around the book blogging community and when I saw this offering on the NetGalley site, and noticed that it was under 200 pages long I figured I'd give it a go.The Girl in the Green Raincoat is the eleventh Tess Monaghan story, but in spite of not knowing Tess at all, I found myself easily getting my bearings and figuring out who was who fairly quickly. I felt sympathy for Tess and her bedridden state, although I had a harder time understanding just why she seemed to feel resentment toward her unborn daughter. I admit to snorting with laughter at the opening few pages of the book and, as a result, easily understanding the relationship between Tess and Whitney. The mystery was okay, with a nice twist thrown in that, while not completely unseen, still gave me a few details that I hadn't thought of.I do have one nit-picky thing to say though. The raincoat that plays so prominently in this story is described in the book as being "celery green". The book on the cover is definitely not "celery green", being more of an emerald color. It was that very color that drew my eye to the book in the first place, so to have it be described in the book as more of a celery color got to me (probably more than it should have). Such an easy thing to fix - I wonder why it was done that way.more
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