Find your next favorite book

Become a member today and read free for 30 days
UnavailableEverything and the Moon
Currently unavailable on Scribd

Everything and the Moon

Continue browsing

Currently unavailable on Scribd

Everything and the Moon

ratings:
4/5 (65 ratings)
Length:
352 pages
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Oct 13, 2009
ISBN:
9780061741869
Format:
Book

Description

It was indisputably love at first sight. But Victoria Lyndon was merely the teenaged daughter of a vicar. . .while Robert Kemble was the dashing young earl of Macclesfield. Surely what their meddlesome fathers insisted must have been true-that he was a reckless seducer determined to destroy her innocence. . . and she was a shameless fortune hunter. So it most certainly was for the best when their plans to elope went hopelessly awry.

Even after a seven-year separation, Victoria-now a governess-still leaves Robert breathless. But how could he ever again trust the raven-haired deceiver who had shattered his soul? And Victoria could never give her heart a second time to the cad who so callously trampled on it the first. But a passion fated will not be denied, and vows of love yearn to be kept. . . even when one promises the moon.

Publisher:
Released:
Oct 13, 2009
ISBN:
9780061741869
Format:
Book

About the author

A Seattle7Writers project for literacy, this novel was written by Kathleen Alcalá, Matthew Amster-Burton, Kit Bakke, Erica Bauermeister, Sean Beaudoin, Dave Boling, Deb Caletti, Carol Cassella, William Dietrich, Robert Dugoni, Kevin Emerson, Karen Finneyfrock, Clyde Ford, Jamie Ford, Elizabeth George, Mary Guterson, Maria Dahvana Headley, Teri Hein, Stephanie Kallos, Erik Larson, David Lasky, Stacey Levine, Frances McCue, Jarret Middleton, Peter Mountford, Kevin O'Brien, Julia Quinn, Nancy Rawles, Suzanne Selfors, Jennie Shortridge, Ed Skoog, Garth Stein, Greg Stump, Indu Sundaresan, Craig Welch and Susan Wiggs. Foreword by Nancy Pearl. Introduction by Garth Stein.


Reviews

What people think about Everything and the Moon

3.8
65 ratings / 19 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Was skeptical at first, thinking it would be one of those stories that went on and on because of a simple misunderstanding and could easily be rectified. But I should know by now not to be skeptical with Quinn! It was good, and I had some laughs.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book. It required considerable suspension of disbelief, but once my disbelief was dangling just below the ceiling I did get quite intrigued by it. The heroine is bordering on TSTL - but you can see why she does some of the things she does, even when (a) said action is practically suicidal or (b) she probably ought to have got over those hangups by now. The hero can be overbearing, annoying and far from stupidity-free himself - although he can also be charming. Their main Big Misunderstanding is understandable (sorry) but it takes them far too long to fix it and stop being unreasonably suspicious of one another and to stop behaving like idiots. That said, it's entertaining and fun, and has some very sweet moments. Some of the secondary characters are wonderfully silly and very likeable. The book is well structured and well paced, and although there are a couple of mistakes they are not significant. I think this now completes my reading of Quinn's back-list; this wasn't one of my favourites, but I did enjoy reading it.
  • (2/5)
    Not nearly as good as her others. Too formulaic and the characters weren't developed enough for my taste. The exploration of power and control had the potential to be interesting but instead left me a little queasy.
  • (3/5)
    funny.and i love the fact the author wrote a note at the very beginning to tell you it was full on sappy. i still don't think the guy got the whole miss independence thing she wanted but oh well. in those times i doubt any man would understand it. some still don't even in today's day and and age.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this story the only thing I didn't like was how stubborn she was. through out the whole book I just always felt that he loved her more. It felt like there was something so much more special about him then her.
  • (4/5)
    What a great story! I laughed and cried many times! Such wonderful writing and really engaging characters!! I love this authors work!!

    I am currently on a Regency kick and this one was terrific!!
  • (4/5)
    ♥ Everything and the Moon:
    I truly love Julia's style of writing!!
    And this book is just so romantic and lovely!!

    Robert and Victoria's love endured a lot and still they are on fire after 7 years of not seeing each other!! The “Hens” chapters made me laugh a lot!! I am so glad Robert knew what really happened 7 years ago quickly!! The story reminds me a lot of Persuasion by Jane Austen, giving second chances and all that.

    One of my favorite parts, is the sea scene, It's been awhile since I read the book but somehow this scene is still with me, I still think of it. It's a cold, angry scene filled with pain, remorse and regret and above all love and comedy.

    What made me drop a star however is Victoria! She just made the book drag when they could have gotten their happy ending a while ago, beside that the book is good.
  • (3/5)
    This is a cute book. Although early in Julia Quinn's career (published in 1997), she is getting her distinctive witty, fun voice in this book. Robert is a loveable character - much more convincing lovable than he is rakish. Victoria is a stubborn character who greatly annoys me in places - she seems to put herself in danger just to go contrary to Robert's wishes. While this book is fun, it does have some problems. First, Victoria holds long grudges. After they've both realized that the problem with elopement was a misunderstanding, shouldn't some of her anger and distrust towards him evaporate? It doesn't seem to. In fact, she seems almost more annoyed with him than ever. Secondly, when it seems like it would be pushing it just too far for her to be annoyed with him anymore for what happened years ago and has been shown to just be a misunderstanding, she introduces the idea that Victoria treasures her "independence" too much to marry him. Er...if I were living in a hovel and working for a dressmaker - not a fantastic job - I would think it would be rather ridiculous not to marry a man I loved who could get me out of a rather miserable situation. Someone really needs to knock some sense into her head. Despite these problems, however, this is a great book, and I really enjoyed it.
  • (3/5)
    Dear Robert, you kidnapped her, of course she's upset. Apologise lots and start to understand that you're entering a partnership and she's quite an independent person, you have got to treat her better or she's going to be miserable.Dear Victoria, he means well, you're going to have to keep fighting for some independence. He's a bit of an idiot and you will have to keep him on his toes or he's going to start taking your for granted.It's not a bad read, two people fall in love and enjoy a summer, however both fathers are against the match which causes them to fall out and get caught up in a huge misunderstanding. The two of them meet again seven years later when Victoria is working as a governess and hating her work. They have to work through several layers of misunderstanding before they can have their happy ever after.Light, I did have some issues with some of the kidnapping and the certainty the hero had that he was right all the time.
  • (5/5)
    This story doesn’t start off with a very good beginning. I mean that these two are headed to a wonderful happily ever after and then their fathers get involved and everything goes down the drain. Everything does work out in the end but it takes the rest of the book to remedy the problem. I will give Robert Kemble, Earl of Macclesfield, credit he is nothing if not persistent. When he finally realizes what happen all those long years ago he pursues Victoria Lyndon with a single minded purpose. Besides being tenacious, Robert is also very intelligent, kind and loving. There are times throughout the story that we have to remind ourselves that Robert is kind but that is only because Victoria is driving him batty. For all intents and purposes Robert is what all of us want in a husband and an alpha male. I love how he protects Victoria but he is willing to let her make her own decisions. Victoria Lyndon is a vicar’s daughter. I think that she tries to make the right decisions and do the right things but things just get out of hand around her. For the most part Victoria just wants to loved and wanted. Her mother died when she was young and she and her sister have been left to take of a father that is very strict and lost in his sermons and flock. I don’t think that Mr. Lyndon understands his daughters and doesn’t want to waste the time getting to know them. Victoria turns into a distrustful and bitter woman after she and Robert are broken apart. It takes her a very long time to realize that what happened was the fault of both fathers and Robert and her. There were times that I didn’t like Victoria very much. She does redeem herself before the end of the book but just barely.As with so many of Ms. Quinn’s book this story is a quick, fun read. There is an underlying humor throughout that story. Ms. Quinn’s writing is witty and sharp and well planned. Her characters are likable for the most part and they make you want to become involved in their lives even if for just a little while. I love that there is a mention of Alex the Duke of Ashbourne. With so many books now days having complicated and dark plots it is nice to find a lighthearted romp that will bring a smile to your face. That is what you can always count on with one of Ms. Quinn’s books.
  • (3/5)
    Everything and the Moon
    3 Stars

    As a huge fan of Quinn's Bridgertons series, it always amazes me that the same writer is responsible for her ridiculously plotted early works.

    Everything and the Moon has potential as a story of lovers reunited after a huge misunderstanding. Let me preface the rest of this review by saying that this theme is one I detest with a vengeance. That said, it is actually well-written here and the first half of the book is engaging, particularly due to Robert and Victoria's witty sniping and bickering (Quinn is very skilled at this type of dialogue).

    Unfortunately, the second half of the book is drawn out and tedious. The huge misunderstanding is quickly resolved and the rest of the story revolves around Robert's obsessive determination to force Victoria into marriage (supposedly for her own good) and her playing hard to get - running hot one minute and cold the next. At this point, I lost interest in the characters and their romance despite their early chemistry.

    All in all, the book is well-written (despite the repetitions of some scenes that act more as filler), the dialogue is snappy and there are several endearing moments that make it all worthwhile.
  • (4/5)
    An entertaining piece of fluff but not up to the standard of Quinn's later books. Even so it passed the time quite nicely.
  • (4/5)
    Love at first site. Robert fell in love with Victoria. Their plans to elope went terribly wrong thanks to their father’s.Seven years later they meet again and Robert finds he is still very attracted to her. He wronged her twice, will three times be the charm.
  • (1/5)
    Julia Quinn decided to write her fourth novel about instantly falling in love. I wish she had tried for a good romance instead. I suppose I have read eight of her novels and the Bridgerton series is good. Her early books are not, and this is the worst. To the extent I actually gave up a third of the way in having been annoyed by some fundamnetal incongruities.A problem with the early novels is JQ seems not to know the Georgian period. In the UK almost all the building stock is two storied particularly for the upper class , and at this time the local vicar was an important local figure. So having the heroine and the hero climbing in and out of ground floor bedrooms is a jarring note. Open windows? Home security zero - for Pete's sake. Also a vicars daughter climbing out to frolic at night with someone she has only just met ....pleeze. And the lack of servants.There was just so much that is unlikely in the first few chapters that it was impossible. One suspends most critical faculties when enjoying a novel but this was too much. Incidentally on putting this down I read Winifred Watson's third novel - Miss Pettigrew Lives for A Day - and that is so immeasurably superior in dealing with instant attraction and being light and amusing that it shows what quality can be.
  • (3/5)
    Really 3.5 stars. I love Julia Quinn's books but this one left me disappointed. I like my heroes a bit more dangerous.
  • (3/5)
    Oh, the power of words! Their fathers vehemently disapproved of Robert Kemble’s plan to marry Victoria Lyndon. They were too young, and the difference in their birth and wealth too vast. So what was this lovelorn couple to do but elope? Right before the elopement hard words were exchanged by each father to his child, and the truth in those words took root in Robert’s and Victoria’s mind. When Victoria did not appear at the meeting place, and when Robert fled immediately afterwards each felt heartbroken but convinced the words spoken by their father was true. Seven years passed…Victoria and Robert are brought together in a most unexpected way, and feel guarded, and mistrustful of one another…and yet the spark is still there. Will they be able to overcome not only the differences in their birth and wealth, but also the deep sense of betrayal each has carried around for all those years? This novel was well done, no loose ends were left hanging, but somehow it was just too much. Robert’s behavior toward Victoria was over-the-top, and Victoria’s behavior was inconsistent. She was generally a compliant person, but when she was in a desperate situation this rather passive woman (who was deeply in love with Robert) refused to fall in with Robert’s honorable plans for her. I think if the novel had been about 100 pages shorter, or if Robert’s courtship had been both less aggressive and taken place over a longer period of time it might have been just right.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book. It required considerable suspension of disbelief, but once my disbelief was dangling just below the ceiling I did get quite intrigued by it. The heroine is bordering on TSTL - but you can see why she does some of the things she does, even when (a) said action is practically suicidal or (b) she probably ought to have got over those hangups by now. The hero can be overbearing, annoying and far from stupidity-free himself - although he can also be charming. Their main Big Misunderstanding is understandable (sorry) but it takes them far too long to fix it and stop being unreasonably suspicious of one another and to stop behaving like idiots. That said, it's entertaining and fun, and has some very sweet moments. Some of the secondary characters are wonderfully silly and very likeable. The book is well structured and well paced, and although there are a couple of mistakes they are not significant. I think this now completes my reading of Quinn's back-list; this wasn't one of my favourites, but I did enjoy reading it.
  • (3/5)
    Good solid romance, sympathetic characters, plot moves along nicely. Not stellar, but good.Young couple fall in love at first sight, but when their elopement goes wrong, they each think the other has been false. Seven years later they meet again, and start clearing up misunderstandings and getting to know each other as grown ups.
  • (3/5)
    This is a cute book. Although early in Julia Quinn's career (published in 1997), she is getting her distinctive witty, fun voice in this book. Robert is a loveable character - much more convincing lovable than he is rakish. Victoria is a stubborn character who greatly annoys me in places - she seems to put herself in danger just to go contrary to Robert's wishes. While this book is fun, it does have some problems. First, Victoria holds long grudges. After they've both realized that the problem with elopement was a misunderstanding, shouldn't some of her anger and distrust towards him evaporate? It doesn't seem to. In fact, she seems almost more annoyed with him than ever. Secondly, when it seems like it would be pushing it just too far for her to be annoyed with him anymore for what happened years ago and has been shown to just be a misunderstanding, she introduces the idea that Victoria treasures her "independence" too much to marry him. Er...if I were living in a hovel and working for a dressmaker - not a fantastic job - I would think it would be rather ridiculous not to marry a man I loved who could get me out of a rather miserable situation. Someone really needs to knock some sense into her head. Despite these problems, however, this is a great book, and I really enjoyed it.