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From the Publisher

“A must-read addition to the urban fantasy genre.”
—Kim Harrison

“Drake has composed a love letter to the vampire genre.”
—Vicki Pettersson

“Jocelynn Drake will have you coming back for more.”
—Jeaniene Frost

New York Times bestselling author Jocelynn Drake brings her remarkable Dark Days series to a stunning and dramatic conclusion with Burn the Night—a thrilling, page-turning masterwork of urban fantasy that brings the powerful Nightwalker Mira and her cohort, the conflicted vampire slayer Danaus, face to face with their most feared demons as the dreaded Great Awakening approaches. Burn the Night offers superior supernatural thrills and adventure in the bestselling tradition of Patricia Briggs, Carrie Vaughn, and Kelley Armstrong.

Topics: Vampires and Witches

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062087980
List price: $6.99
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