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Charlie Asher is a pretty normal guy with a normal life, married to a bright and pretty woman who actually loves him for his normalcy. They're even about to have their first child. Yes, Charlie's doing okay—until people start dropping dead around him, and everywhere he goes a dark presence whispers to him from under the streets. Charlie Asher, it seems, has been recruited for a new position: as Death.

It's a dirty job. But, hey! Somebody's gotta do it.

Topics: Death, Funny, Supernatural Powers, San Francisco Bay Area, Black Humor, United States of America, Dark, Grief, Macabre, and The Afterlife

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061801822
List price: $13.83
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In High School I really ate up all of the Piers Anthony books I could and I particularly fell in love with "On a Pale Horse" a book about the Incarnation of Immortality--Death. A guy becomes Death. I loved it.

Fast forward to College and I discovered this amazing HBO show "Dead Like Me" about a bunch of people who become reapers. They get the first name of the person who is going to die on a POST IT NOTE and have to claim the soul before they die.

Fast forward to me reading this book. Kind of disappointed. The similarities to "Dead Like Me" (come on, Moore! Seriously!) and "On a Pale Horse" I had to force my way through the beginning. This is my problem with Twilight and Sookie Stackhouse. Love Sookie and Love True Blood but Twilight just isn't different enough to make me interested in it.

The premise of "A Dirty Job" is different enough that it can exist on its own but unfortunately for me I think that I've spent far too long in the realm of Literature and had a hard time taking the book lightly. It's difficult for me to let go and just enjoy a good "fluff" book.

That being said, I enjoyed reading it even though it was a struggle and I would highly recommend this to anyone who is not a boring book snob like myself. At the end of the day it's hilarious, a light read, and a fun one at that. :)more
I adore Christopher Moore's books. Something about the juxtaposition of absurd and sublime is very satisfying. The only problem I've had is that he doesn't always seem to know how to end his books, and that can be hard when the story up until that point was fabu. *Lamb* just kind of ends. Same with *Fool*. With *A Dirty Job*, though, the end is satisfying. Also, on top of the typical fun plot and crazy dialog, we get to revisit with a lot of the best supporting characters from some of Moore's other books - like Bummer the Boston Terrier. Love that little dog.more
A Dirty Job is a hilarious and interesting offering from Christopher Moore, this time about Death. Moore does another awesome job taking a serious subject and making it pure fun and crazy-ness. It's also great to see some characters that occur in his other books as well (in an unobtrusive way).more
A nobody becomes, one day, a "death merchant".
I've found a new favourite author, someone who makes me laugh as much as Terry Pratchett, Tom Robbins, or Douglas Adams yet wears his learning very lightly.
I never felt that I was being lectured at, but saw underneath the hip cynicism a sacred respect for the dying.more
I laughed a lot during this book, but I also felt like this book was funny at parts when it should've been. I wanted to yell at the characters a lot, but I guess it was a good book because it made me care enough to yell.

Although the ending was kind of predictable.more
This was an impulsive purchase one day at Borders Books. The story is cute, crazy and at times ridiculous, but the mix works well. I love how he mixed different philosophies of life and death in the story.more
This is a very funny book, but it has its faults. Charlie Asher is a happily-married, self-avowed Beta male, whose wife, Rachel, has just given birth to their first child, Sophie. After he (reluctantly) leaves the hospital to go rest, he finds his wife’s Sarah McLachlan CD in the car. He decides to take the CD back to her, but when he enters the room, he sees a large man in a green jumper looming over his wife. Obviously, Charlie is surprised, and then worried. But not as much as Minty Fresh (don’t ask), the aforesaid large-man-in-a-green-jumper. Charlie is not supposed to be able to see Minty, because Minty is a self-styled Death Merchant: he collects the soul objects from the recently deceased, and then delivers them to those in need of a soul. Now, with a dead wife, a new daughter, and a hole heap of problems, Charlie must learn the trade of Death Merchant before the Forces of Darkness can lay claim to the surface world.This is quite an entertaining premise, although the role of the soul objects could have been fleshed out a bit more – the Death Merchants just keep them in their stores until the right person coincidentally comes along. Moore can be very funny, and luckily avoids scatological humour (for the most part). He does make quite a few non-PC jokes, usually involving sex, but that did not bother me inordinately. The book is, however, a bit long at 430 pages, and could have done with a trimming. Moore’s musings on the Beta male psychology is quite entertaining – maybe because it seemed a tad, ahem, applicable to my own situation. His introduction of speculative content is done well for the most part, though he does take extreme liberties in mixing his mythologies: he uses the Morrigan, Orcus, Buddhist eschatology, and more. One gets the sense at times that he was just introducing things for the hell of it, especially near to the end of the book.The only substantial problem I had with the book also came near to the end of the book. Moore introduces a character with powers that completely unbalances the ending. While the Death Merchants only kept custody of the soul objects, this character causes the ending to lack any real tension. Moore also ends the book on a jarringly ‘humorous’ note which, despite the humorous tone of the book, did not quite fit with the more serious mood of the rest of the ending.I enjoyed this book, and will try more of Christopher Moore’s work in the future. Hopefully, his other books are more streamlined and less improvisational.more
 Everyone dies. In A Dirty Job Christopher Moore gives you a behind the scenes look at what happens after death. Charlie Asher is your average American Beta Male, he lives a normal life. His wife, Rachel, is in the hospital and is resting after giving birth to their first child, a beautiful baby girl, Sophie. Charlie leaves the room to grab something from the car and when he comes back there is a tall man in mint green clothing standing next to Rachel’s bed and looking at her. Charlie tells the man he shouldn’t be in the room and the man acts surprised, insisting Charlie shouldn’t be able to see him. Charlie once again tells the man to leave because he is going to wake Rachel, but Rachel’s not sleeping. She’s dead.Christopher Moore has written the ultimate story explaining everything you need to know about death. His characters are relatable and likeable. Although the entire book is about death only a few parts of it are actually sad. The rest of the book is filled with dry and witty humor.The moment Charlie sees the man in green his life is destined to change forever. His wife is dead, he has a daughter, and he is now a death merchant. You do not choose to be a death merchant, you get a book in the mail explaining that you’re a death merchant and you must follow the rules unless you want all hell to break loose, literally. The death merchants find the souls of recently deceased people, trapped in the person’s most prized material object. Charlie gets along pretty well with being a death merchant, despite the hilarious obstacles Moore throws in his way. For example, when he goes to a person’s house to collect their soul, but the person’s not dead and they don’t show any signs of dying. Charlie and his death merchant friend Minty Fresh need to find out why people aren’t dying before “you know-what” happens. Tim Sandlin, author of the GroVont trilogy, says “I would recommend A Dirty Job to anyone who is ever likely to die.” And I couldn’t agree more.more
This made me want to move back to SF and find Asher and Co. The absurdity just keeps on going and for some reason it's still intelligent. One really has to be smart to have a spanking sense of humor. Love it!more
This is ahilarious book about the nature of life. Magic realism with a world populated by cross over characters from several of Moore's other works. This is a novel for folks who want to laugh - and like a little magic thrown in with their mundane second hand shop owners!more
A fun book marred by a sad and bizarre end. I love Christopher Moore's characters, but I don't think I fully get his sense of humor - or perhaps I am held back by my bourgeois need for a happy, everybody-rides-off-into-the-sunset-style ending. If you want to know what this book is like, think mystery/humor in the vein of Terry Pratchett or Neil Gaiman, with less social commentary than Pratchett, and less straightforwardness.more
The award for most original story I've read this year goes, hands down, to this book. I had heard of Moore before but always seemed to avoid him, thinking the covers would be exactly like the books. I'm so glad I was turned on to this book because I don't think I could ever live without Moore's humor. Original, witty, and downright heart-wrenching, this book is something all lovers of fantasy--and the humorous--should read. Just to give you an example, there are 14-inch tall bundles of animal parts dressed in 18th century ballgown wear. There, that should be enough to convince you to read it. The reason I only gave the book 4.5 stars out of 5 was due to the "big fight" at the ending. I'm not going to give the ending away, so I will only say I was disappointed.more
i laughed and laughed and laughed and laughed.....and that's all you really need to know. read this book. Great for the dreaded plane ride, great for a big fat laugh.more
Witty, adventurous, and down right weird at times. A fun read from start to finish with dialogue and characters that will make you laugh out loud.Charlie Asher doesn't expect that in his life, he would lose his wife, have Death as a daughter, two giant hellhounds in his apartment, and all sorts of creepy critters and black demon women in his life.more
I have noticed that as writers get more popular, their books become more rushed, the plot less thought out, the characters not as fully developed, the hand of an editor noticeably absent. I guess this should come as no surprise. The publisher knows the title will sell, so why take the extra time?Unfortunately, Moore is an author who suffers from this malady. Ever since Lamb, which I think was his high point, his books have been – while still entertaining – lacking the sparkle that made his earlier novels so much fun.In A Dirty Job, Moore explores how Death works – and by Death, I mean the guy with the black robe and scythe. Except Death turns out to be several rather innocuous guys and gals, most of them shopkeepers, who suddenly find themselves charged with picking up and reselling objects containing the souls of the recently deceased. How this whole process works – and why it works that way—is not adequately explained. Questions come to mind: What is the difference between a person with a soul and a person without one? Why does someone reach middle age or even old age without a soul? When the soul passes on to another person, does the soul’s personality take over the former personality of the new owner, like demonic possession?But never mind all that, because the plot is about horrific wraith creatures that live in the sewers and are trying to take over the surface world, and the return of something called the Luminatus, which is actually the capital-D Death (or so the book implies). Nothing ever comes together very well, and the end is an unexplained letdown, but the story is still fun and, in many parts, funny.more
If you like Moore and/or dark comedy writing (or just need a break from serious novels, autobiographies, or accounts of WWII), this book is for you. I have a great deal of respect for the creativity displayed by Moore and have really only laughed out loud in two books (this one and Lamb). Some scenes did get a little too absurd for me, but overall I enjoyed the premise and connected with Charlie Asher (and, of course, Sophie).more
Simply the funniest book I have ever read. Great story filled with memorable, witty one-liners. Amazingly fun.more
When Charlie Asher's wife dies unexpectedly, he struggles not only with his newborn daughter but his new vocation as a "death merchant," retrieving the objects that someone's soul enters after they die. Soon, this all seems to become routine, but something dark and powerful is stirring in the sewers beneath the city.Why I picked it up: I was hankering for another of Moore's San Francisco stories. It was great to see the Emperor, Inspector Rivera, and other side characters (including an Abby Normal cameo!) again.Why I finished it: Not for Fisher Steven's performance. I didn't like his reading of "Lamb," either, and I hope he's not becoming the go-to performer for Moore's books. He's competent, but I prefer Susan Bennett's work. That aside, the book kept me going with its surprising wisdom. Behind the comedy, Moore gives us a very thoughtful exploration of the meaning of death and grief. And the particular qualities of beta males.I'd give it to: Anyone who liked "Dead Like Me" or Piers Anthony's "On a Pale Horse" would welcome this more comic take on the same idea.more
This was a quirky read - a little strange but well written with an interesting idea. It made me laugh in more than a few places - dark humour but beautifully handled. You wont find any traditional character growth - its all about the idea and the story and the sheer absurdity. It is fun though - should make you laugh at least once and I would recommend you try it at least if you have a bent for the weird.I will be looking for more of his books based on this one.more
Only Christopher Moore could write a funny book about death. An everyday guy finds out that he has been given a dirty job: Merchant of Death. Makes him strong. Like bear.more
Warning: Do not under any circumstances read this book on public transportation unless you want the transportation police to come and take you off of whatever vehicle to put you in a padded room. It's that funny.I don't normally seek out "humor" writers - they're so often really banal, but Christopher Moore is just laugh out loud funny. I think of him as the bastard child of Armistead Maupin and Terry Pratchett - he's so very San Francisco and so very twisted in his humor.I like this one, but not as much as I liked the other book of his that I've read. It's funny and the story is pretty cool - Death Merchants, North Beach, Chinatown, a baby with Russian and Chinese old lady babysitters, a lesbian sister who steals the main character's suits, sewer harpies, and hell hounds. Mr. Moore gets revved up and going from the very beginning of this book, carefully setting his plot pieces in order, barreling inexorably to the grand finale. And then there's the last third of the book which veers off into a tangent (as if his plot jumped the tracks) and never really gets back on course. Despite this issue it's still worth the read, especially if you're feeling low and want something to cheer you up. Good fun.P.S. I want some freakin' hell hounds.more
Another hoot from CM. I kinda feel like I'm recycling one of my previous reviews of one of his books, but, while not my favorite CM (see Lamb and Fool), still a hilarious and sometimes wild ride on his train of thought. Hold on!more
This was the first book I read by this auther and I can now say there is only one of his that I have not had a chance to read. My co-workes thought i was going a bit mad as i litterally laughed at every page.more
Christopher Moore is very creative and his books mix humor with some good philosophical insights. Normally, I would not read this type of book but having read Lamb and Fool, I am a Moore fan. This was entertaining and funny and after all, that is what you want out of a book once in a while. He is never boring and his side characters are always great. I will continue to try and read most of his books(though probably not the vampire ones). Being from San Francisco, it is great to see the city be part of the story. Good stuff!!1more
Read all 125 reviews

Reviews

In High School I really ate up all of the Piers Anthony books I could and I particularly fell in love with "On a Pale Horse" a book about the Incarnation of Immortality--Death. A guy becomes Death. I loved it.

Fast forward to College and I discovered this amazing HBO show "Dead Like Me" about a bunch of people who become reapers. They get the first name of the person who is going to die on a POST IT NOTE and have to claim the soul before they die.

Fast forward to me reading this book. Kind of disappointed. The similarities to "Dead Like Me" (come on, Moore! Seriously!) and "On a Pale Horse" I had to force my way through the beginning. This is my problem with Twilight and Sookie Stackhouse. Love Sookie and Love True Blood but Twilight just isn't different enough to make me interested in it.

The premise of "A Dirty Job" is different enough that it can exist on its own but unfortunately for me I think that I've spent far too long in the realm of Literature and had a hard time taking the book lightly. It's difficult for me to let go and just enjoy a good "fluff" book.

That being said, I enjoyed reading it even though it was a struggle and I would highly recommend this to anyone who is not a boring book snob like myself. At the end of the day it's hilarious, a light read, and a fun one at that. :)more
I adore Christopher Moore's books. Something about the juxtaposition of absurd and sublime is very satisfying. The only problem I've had is that he doesn't always seem to know how to end his books, and that can be hard when the story up until that point was fabu. *Lamb* just kind of ends. Same with *Fool*. With *A Dirty Job*, though, the end is satisfying. Also, on top of the typical fun plot and crazy dialog, we get to revisit with a lot of the best supporting characters from some of Moore's other books - like Bummer the Boston Terrier. Love that little dog.more
A Dirty Job is a hilarious and interesting offering from Christopher Moore, this time about Death. Moore does another awesome job taking a serious subject and making it pure fun and crazy-ness. It's also great to see some characters that occur in his other books as well (in an unobtrusive way).more
A nobody becomes, one day, a "death merchant".
I've found a new favourite author, someone who makes me laugh as much as Terry Pratchett, Tom Robbins, or Douglas Adams yet wears his learning very lightly.
I never felt that I was being lectured at, but saw underneath the hip cynicism a sacred respect for the dying.more
I laughed a lot during this book, but I also felt like this book was funny at parts when it should've been. I wanted to yell at the characters a lot, but I guess it was a good book because it made me care enough to yell.

Although the ending was kind of predictable.more
This was an impulsive purchase one day at Borders Books. The story is cute, crazy and at times ridiculous, but the mix works well. I love how he mixed different philosophies of life and death in the story.more
This is a very funny book, but it has its faults. Charlie Asher is a happily-married, self-avowed Beta male, whose wife, Rachel, has just given birth to their first child, Sophie. After he (reluctantly) leaves the hospital to go rest, he finds his wife’s Sarah McLachlan CD in the car. He decides to take the CD back to her, but when he enters the room, he sees a large man in a green jumper looming over his wife. Obviously, Charlie is surprised, and then worried. But not as much as Minty Fresh (don’t ask), the aforesaid large-man-in-a-green-jumper. Charlie is not supposed to be able to see Minty, because Minty is a self-styled Death Merchant: he collects the soul objects from the recently deceased, and then delivers them to those in need of a soul. Now, with a dead wife, a new daughter, and a hole heap of problems, Charlie must learn the trade of Death Merchant before the Forces of Darkness can lay claim to the surface world.This is quite an entertaining premise, although the role of the soul objects could have been fleshed out a bit more – the Death Merchants just keep them in their stores until the right person coincidentally comes along. Moore can be very funny, and luckily avoids scatological humour (for the most part). He does make quite a few non-PC jokes, usually involving sex, but that did not bother me inordinately. The book is, however, a bit long at 430 pages, and could have done with a trimming. Moore’s musings on the Beta male psychology is quite entertaining – maybe because it seemed a tad, ahem, applicable to my own situation. His introduction of speculative content is done well for the most part, though he does take extreme liberties in mixing his mythologies: he uses the Morrigan, Orcus, Buddhist eschatology, and more. One gets the sense at times that he was just introducing things for the hell of it, especially near to the end of the book.The only substantial problem I had with the book also came near to the end of the book. Moore introduces a character with powers that completely unbalances the ending. While the Death Merchants only kept custody of the soul objects, this character causes the ending to lack any real tension. Moore also ends the book on a jarringly ‘humorous’ note which, despite the humorous tone of the book, did not quite fit with the more serious mood of the rest of the ending.I enjoyed this book, and will try more of Christopher Moore’s work in the future. Hopefully, his other books are more streamlined and less improvisational.more
 Everyone dies. In A Dirty Job Christopher Moore gives you a behind the scenes look at what happens after death. Charlie Asher is your average American Beta Male, he lives a normal life. His wife, Rachel, is in the hospital and is resting after giving birth to their first child, a beautiful baby girl, Sophie. Charlie leaves the room to grab something from the car and when he comes back there is a tall man in mint green clothing standing next to Rachel’s bed and looking at her. Charlie tells the man he shouldn’t be in the room and the man acts surprised, insisting Charlie shouldn’t be able to see him. Charlie once again tells the man to leave because he is going to wake Rachel, but Rachel’s not sleeping. She’s dead.Christopher Moore has written the ultimate story explaining everything you need to know about death. His characters are relatable and likeable. Although the entire book is about death only a few parts of it are actually sad. The rest of the book is filled with dry and witty humor.The moment Charlie sees the man in green his life is destined to change forever. His wife is dead, he has a daughter, and he is now a death merchant. You do not choose to be a death merchant, you get a book in the mail explaining that you’re a death merchant and you must follow the rules unless you want all hell to break loose, literally. The death merchants find the souls of recently deceased people, trapped in the person’s most prized material object. Charlie gets along pretty well with being a death merchant, despite the hilarious obstacles Moore throws in his way. For example, when he goes to a person’s house to collect their soul, but the person’s not dead and they don’t show any signs of dying. Charlie and his death merchant friend Minty Fresh need to find out why people aren’t dying before “you know-what” happens. Tim Sandlin, author of the GroVont trilogy, says “I would recommend A Dirty Job to anyone who is ever likely to die.” And I couldn’t agree more.more
This made me want to move back to SF and find Asher and Co. The absurdity just keeps on going and for some reason it's still intelligent. One really has to be smart to have a spanking sense of humor. Love it!more
This is ahilarious book about the nature of life. Magic realism with a world populated by cross over characters from several of Moore's other works. This is a novel for folks who want to laugh - and like a little magic thrown in with their mundane second hand shop owners!more
A fun book marred by a sad and bizarre end. I love Christopher Moore's characters, but I don't think I fully get his sense of humor - or perhaps I am held back by my bourgeois need for a happy, everybody-rides-off-into-the-sunset-style ending. If you want to know what this book is like, think mystery/humor in the vein of Terry Pratchett or Neil Gaiman, with less social commentary than Pratchett, and less straightforwardness.more
The award for most original story I've read this year goes, hands down, to this book. I had heard of Moore before but always seemed to avoid him, thinking the covers would be exactly like the books. I'm so glad I was turned on to this book because I don't think I could ever live without Moore's humor. Original, witty, and downright heart-wrenching, this book is something all lovers of fantasy--and the humorous--should read. Just to give you an example, there are 14-inch tall bundles of animal parts dressed in 18th century ballgown wear. There, that should be enough to convince you to read it. The reason I only gave the book 4.5 stars out of 5 was due to the "big fight" at the ending. I'm not going to give the ending away, so I will only say I was disappointed.more
i laughed and laughed and laughed and laughed.....and that's all you really need to know. read this book. Great for the dreaded plane ride, great for a big fat laugh.more
Witty, adventurous, and down right weird at times. A fun read from start to finish with dialogue and characters that will make you laugh out loud.Charlie Asher doesn't expect that in his life, he would lose his wife, have Death as a daughter, two giant hellhounds in his apartment, and all sorts of creepy critters and black demon women in his life.more
I have noticed that as writers get more popular, their books become more rushed, the plot less thought out, the characters not as fully developed, the hand of an editor noticeably absent. I guess this should come as no surprise. The publisher knows the title will sell, so why take the extra time?Unfortunately, Moore is an author who suffers from this malady. Ever since Lamb, which I think was his high point, his books have been – while still entertaining – lacking the sparkle that made his earlier novels so much fun.In A Dirty Job, Moore explores how Death works – and by Death, I mean the guy with the black robe and scythe. Except Death turns out to be several rather innocuous guys and gals, most of them shopkeepers, who suddenly find themselves charged with picking up and reselling objects containing the souls of the recently deceased. How this whole process works – and why it works that way—is not adequately explained. Questions come to mind: What is the difference between a person with a soul and a person without one? Why does someone reach middle age or even old age without a soul? When the soul passes on to another person, does the soul’s personality take over the former personality of the new owner, like demonic possession?But never mind all that, because the plot is about horrific wraith creatures that live in the sewers and are trying to take over the surface world, and the return of something called the Luminatus, which is actually the capital-D Death (or so the book implies). Nothing ever comes together very well, and the end is an unexplained letdown, but the story is still fun and, in many parts, funny.more
If you like Moore and/or dark comedy writing (or just need a break from serious novels, autobiographies, or accounts of WWII), this book is for you. I have a great deal of respect for the creativity displayed by Moore and have really only laughed out loud in two books (this one and Lamb). Some scenes did get a little too absurd for me, but overall I enjoyed the premise and connected with Charlie Asher (and, of course, Sophie).more
Simply the funniest book I have ever read. Great story filled with memorable, witty one-liners. Amazingly fun.more
When Charlie Asher's wife dies unexpectedly, he struggles not only with his newborn daughter but his new vocation as a "death merchant," retrieving the objects that someone's soul enters after they die. Soon, this all seems to become routine, but something dark and powerful is stirring in the sewers beneath the city.Why I picked it up: I was hankering for another of Moore's San Francisco stories. It was great to see the Emperor, Inspector Rivera, and other side characters (including an Abby Normal cameo!) again.Why I finished it: Not for Fisher Steven's performance. I didn't like his reading of "Lamb," either, and I hope he's not becoming the go-to performer for Moore's books. He's competent, but I prefer Susan Bennett's work. That aside, the book kept me going with its surprising wisdom. Behind the comedy, Moore gives us a very thoughtful exploration of the meaning of death and grief. And the particular qualities of beta males.I'd give it to: Anyone who liked "Dead Like Me" or Piers Anthony's "On a Pale Horse" would welcome this more comic take on the same idea.more
This was a quirky read - a little strange but well written with an interesting idea. It made me laugh in more than a few places - dark humour but beautifully handled. You wont find any traditional character growth - its all about the idea and the story and the sheer absurdity. It is fun though - should make you laugh at least once and I would recommend you try it at least if you have a bent for the weird.I will be looking for more of his books based on this one.more
Only Christopher Moore could write a funny book about death. An everyday guy finds out that he has been given a dirty job: Merchant of Death. Makes him strong. Like bear.more
Warning: Do not under any circumstances read this book on public transportation unless you want the transportation police to come and take you off of whatever vehicle to put you in a padded room. It's that funny.I don't normally seek out "humor" writers - they're so often really banal, but Christopher Moore is just laugh out loud funny. I think of him as the bastard child of Armistead Maupin and Terry Pratchett - he's so very San Francisco and so very twisted in his humor.I like this one, but not as much as I liked the other book of his that I've read. It's funny and the story is pretty cool - Death Merchants, North Beach, Chinatown, a baby with Russian and Chinese old lady babysitters, a lesbian sister who steals the main character's suits, sewer harpies, and hell hounds. Mr. Moore gets revved up and going from the very beginning of this book, carefully setting his plot pieces in order, barreling inexorably to the grand finale. And then there's the last third of the book which veers off into a tangent (as if his plot jumped the tracks) and never really gets back on course. Despite this issue it's still worth the read, especially if you're feeling low and want something to cheer you up. Good fun.P.S. I want some freakin' hell hounds.more
Another hoot from CM. I kinda feel like I'm recycling one of my previous reviews of one of his books, but, while not my favorite CM (see Lamb and Fool), still a hilarious and sometimes wild ride on his train of thought. Hold on!more
This was the first book I read by this auther and I can now say there is only one of his that I have not had a chance to read. My co-workes thought i was going a bit mad as i litterally laughed at every page.more
Christopher Moore is very creative and his books mix humor with some good philosophical insights. Normally, I would not read this type of book but having read Lamb and Fool, I am a Moore fan. This was entertaining and funny and after all, that is what you want out of a book once in a while. He is never boring and his side characters are always great. I will continue to try and read most of his books(though probably not the vampire ones). Being from San Francisco, it is great to see the city be part of the story. Good stuff!!1more
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