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Just as readers have been transfixed by the stories, characters, and deeper meanings of Lewis's timeless tales in The Chronicles of Narnia, most find this same allure in his classic Space Trilogy. In these fantasy stories for adults, we encounter, once again, magical creatures, a world of wonders, epic battles, and revelations of transcendent truths.

Out of the Silent Planet is the first novel in C. S. Lewis's classic science fiction trilogy. It tells the adventure of Dr. Ransom, a Cambridge academic, who is abducted and taken on a spaceship to the red planet of Malacandra, which he knows as Mars. His captors are plotting to plunder the planet's treasures and plan to offer Ransom as a sacrifice to the creatures who live there. Ransom discovers he has come from the "silent planet"—Earth—whose tragic story is known throughout the universe!

Topics: Mars, Angels, Trilogy, First in a Series, England, Speculative Fiction, Space Travel, Space, Aliens, Allegory, Adventurous, Suspenseful, Philosophical, Inklings, and First Person Narration

Published: HarperCollins on Apr 3, 2012
ISBN: 9780062197030
List price: $5.99
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Out of the Silent Planet is an early example of science fiction. The protagonist, Ransom, is kidnapped and sent into space, eventually arriving at a planet called Malacandra (he finds out later that it's our Mars). A lot of it is simply an exploration of the landscape and its species - hopefully the other books in the trilogy will be less tiresome in that regard, now that we've had our introduction - but there are some good bits of religion and morality at the end. It turns out that the people of Malacandra think of Earth as the "silent planet," literally godforsaken, compared to their own society where their god interacts with them. Which is interesting, and hopefully will make for a good jumping-off point for the rest of the trilogyread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very good, though his musings on the connectivedness of the world are interesting - you can tell that he is Christian, but he's trying to fuse science with Christianity in a time really when there wasn't even a whole lot of resentment between the two. His narration is strange - every once in a while the "I" narrator breaks in, breaking the flow of the story so he seems godlike, but at times not seemingly very important to the overall cohesiveness of the story. at the end we find out Ransom is telling all this to a buddy after finding the word Oyarsa in ancient texts so it all comes out as there is basis, and the last few pages seem like a justificaiton for the entire tale - that it is indeed true and why it was at first presented as fiction.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Gentle, comforting in spite of the tragedy. Reminds me a little of Stapeldon in its cosmic view. I just finished the book and it hasn't settled in my mind yet. This review is a placeholder.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Out of the Silent Planet is an early example of science fiction. The protagonist, Ransom, is kidnapped and sent into space, eventually arriving at a planet called Malacandra (he finds out later that it's our Mars). A lot of it is simply an exploration of the landscape and its species - hopefully the other books in the trilogy will be less tiresome in that regard, now that we've had our introduction - but there are some good bits of religion and morality at the end. It turns out that the people of Malacandra think of Earth as the "silent planet," literally godforsaken, compared to their own society where their god interacts with them. Which is interesting, and hopefully will make for a good jumping-off point for the rest of the trilogy
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very good, though his musings on the connectivedness of the world are interesting - you can tell that he is Christian, but he's trying to fuse science with Christianity in a time really when there wasn't even a whole lot of resentment between the two. His narration is strange - every once in a while the "I" narrator breaks in, breaking the flow of the story so he seems godlike, but at times not seemingly very important to the overall cohesiveness of the story. at the end we find out Ransom is telling all this to a buddy after finding the word Oyarsa in ancient texts so it all comes out as there is basis, and the last few pages seem like a justificaiton for the entire tale - that it is indeed true and why it was at first presented as fiction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Gentle, comforting in spite of the tragedy. Reminds me a little of Stapeldon in its cosmic view. I just finished the book and it hasn't settled in my mind yet. This review is a placeholder.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I remember reading this, but it didn't make much impression on me.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm more familiar with C.S. Lewis as the writer of children's books. This is the first book of his I have read for adults. It held my interest and his descriptions of leaving earth and life on another planet are worth reading it. Where the story lacks some for me is in the characters of the aliens. They were interesting but not engaging; it was hard to imagine them as real. I find this odd because in his children's books there are many characters that are not humans and I did not have the same trouble with them. However, it is worth the read for the plot and the stellar descriptions of life in space and on an alien world.
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Kind of boring until the end. I liked the philosophy and the set up that every planet has it's own god and then there's an overall god.
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