Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

This profound and accessible book details how science is studying nature’s best ideas to solve our toughest 21st-century problems.

If chaos theory transformed our view of the universe, biomimicry is transforming our life on Earth. Biomimicry is innovation inspired by nature – taking advantage of evolution’s 3.8 billion years of R&D since the first bacteria. Biomimics study nature’s best ideas: photosynthesis, brain power, and shells – and adapt them for human use. They are revolutionising how we invent, compute, heal ourselves, harness energy, repair the environment, and feed the world.

Science writer and lecturer Janine Benyus names and explains this phenomenon. She takes us into the lab and out in the field with cutting-edge researchers as they stir vats of proteins to unleash their computing power; analyse how electrons zipping around a leaf cell convert sunlight into fuel in trillionths of a second; discover miracle drugs by watching what chimps eat when they’re sick; study the hardy prairie as a model for low-maintenance agriculture; and more.

Published: HarperCollins on Aug 11, 2009
ISBN: 9780061958922
List price: $8.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Biomimicry
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

If you love building but worry about the impact of the work on our planet, Biomimicry can fill you with hope for the future. Benyus is criticized for not getting all the technical details right as she covers a wide range of scientific subjects armed only with a Master's degree. Buit even those who try to take her down admit that Benyus is making an important subject more accessible to lay readers. By imitating nature (biomimicing), she reports, we can convert our production processes -- including design and construction of buildings -- so that they merge with rather than poison and disrupt the organic cycle. For example, she describes research on building coatings whose pigments are modeled on the chloroplasts in plants and that would produce the power for a building the coatings are applied to.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Reviews

If you love building but worry about the impact of the work on our planet, Biomimicry can fill you with hope for the future. Benyus is criticized for not getting all the technical details right as she covers a wide range of scientific subjects armed only with a Master's degree. Buit even those who try to take her down admit that Benyus is making an important subject more accessible to lay readers. By imitating nature (biomimicing), she reports, we can convert our production processes -- including design and construction of buildings -- so that they merge with rather than poison and disrupt the organic cycle. For example, she describes research on building coatings whose pigments are modeled on the chloroplasts in plants and that would produce the power for a building the coatings are applied to.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
scribd