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From the Publisher

The first book in the acclaimed and award winning New York Times bestselling trilogy. The Girl of Fire and Thorns is a remarkable novel full of adventure, sorcery, heartbreak, and power. "I stayed up until two a.m. reading this last night. Intense, unique. … Definitely recommended."—Veronica Roth, author of the best-selling Divergent series

Once a century, one person is chosen for greatness. Elisa is the chosen one. But she is also the younger of two princesses. The one who has never done anything remarkable, and can't see how she ever will. Now, on her sixteenth birthday, she has become the secret wife of a handsome and worldly king—a king whose country is in turmoil. A king who needs her to be the chosen one, not a failure of a princess.

And he's not the only one who seeks her. Savage enemies, seething with dark magic, are hunting her. A daring, determined revolutionary thinks she could be his people's savior. Soon it is not just her life, but her very heart that is at stake.

Elisa could be everything to those who need her most. If the prophecy is fulfilled. If she finds the power deep within herself. If she doesn't die young. Most of the chosen do.

"A page-turner with broad appeal."—Publishers Weekly

Supports the Common Core State Standards.

Topics: Princesses, Debut, Prophecies, Royalty, First in a Series, Desert, Trilogy, Adventurous, Romantic, War, Kidnapping, Destiny, Love, Revolution, Female Protagonist, and First Person Narration

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062093325
List price: $9.99
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