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The first book in the acclaimed and award winning New York Times bestselling trilogy. The Girl of Fire and Thorns is a remarkable novel full of adventure, sorcery, heartbreak, and power. "I stayed up until two a.m. reading this last night. Intense, unique. … Definitely recommended."—Veronica Roth, author of the best-selling Divergent series

Once a century, one person is chosen for greatness. Elisa is the chosen one. But she is also the younger of two princesses. The one who has never done anything remarkable, and can't see how she ever will. Now, on her sixteenth birthday, she has become the secret wife of a handsome and worldly king—a king whose country is in turmoil. A king who needs her to be the chosen one, not a failure of a princess.

And he's not the only one who seeks her. Savage enemies, seething with dark magic, are hunting her. A daring, determined revolutionary thinks she could be his people's savior. Soon it is not just her life, but her very heart that is at stake.

Elisa could be everything to those who need her most. If the prophecy is fulfilled. If she finds the power deep within herself. If she doesn't die young. Most of the chosen do.

"A page-turner with broad appeal."—Publishers Weekly

Supports the Common Core State Standards.

Topics: Princesses, Debut, Prophecies, Royalty, First in a Series, Desert, Trilogy, Adventurous, Romantic, War, Kidnapping, Destiny, Love, Revolution, Female Protagonist, and First Person Narration

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062093325
List price: $9.99
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4Q, 4PElisa is the second princess in the country of Orovalle. She will not be chosen as the ruler of Orovalle because on her naming day she became "The Chosen One". The bearer of the Godstone. As the bearer, she is committed to service. Service to God and her people. Elisa lives a rather sheltered life and those around her believe that she will not accomplish much. Elisa takes this and her perceived and actual cruel treatment of her older sister to heart. Elisa takes comfort in food and is overweight. As the story begins Elisa is married off to a king of another country at 16 and sent to go live with him. Upon the arrival to her new kindom, her kind and handsome husband, Alexander, begs her to keep their marriage and her identity as the bearer of the godstone a secret. Elisa does as he asks.When Elisa is kidnapped away from her new kingdom by an unlikely kidnapper she is faced with a difficult journey across deserts and time that changes her both physically and emotionally. The strength she gains throughout the story as she encounters death, war, love and family mirrors the writing in the The Girl of Fire and Thorns. Elisa's personal growth over time is a major strength to the story. She is a likable and sympathetic character that is smart, savvy and perceptive beyond her years.This novel is very well written with many unexpected plot turns. Another major strength of this story is the imagery that Carson creates. The details and dialogue are well woven and she leaves you wanting for more. Thank goodness this is the first in a trilogy.more
This review covers both the 1st and 2nd books (sort of) but mostly the first, and does contain some spoilers.
























These are pretty amazing books. Elisa, the heroine of the books, makes an incredible transformation from the beginning of the first book, where she is a chunky, still growing, still learning and not very self-confident girl, to one who can deal with whatever gets tossed at her, mostly because she’s stubborn, doesn’t want to get teased, and wants to prove she can do what everyone else can. So, while she bewails her fate at having to leave her father’s home where there are no challenges and life is easy, leaving is the best thing that could have happened to her. She is very close to her nurse, Ximena, who is truly her best advisor. Elisa faces bloody violence, the subterfuges of court, a husband who doesn’t love her and who keeps a mistress openly, kidnapping, and a whole host of problems she doesn’t know how to deal with, surrounded by people she doesn’t know and unsure of who to trust. An interesting issue that I only remember being brought up in one other book that I am trying to remember is the fact that part of Elisa’s transformation is brought about by tramping through the desert after being kidnapped. As she comes more to terms with who she is and what she can do, she loses the weight, it serves almost as literal emotional baggage. Even though she’s “acceptably thin” at the end (a little annoying) it’s because she’s gone through a transformation. Princess Ben—that’s the other one, a sort of fairy tale, that deals with the princesses’ weight issue, especially when her parents die and she has to learn how to run the kingdom—for her, food serves much the same purpose as it does Elisa—comfort. Small deviation there, just remembered that. CoE concentrates more on what it’s like for Elisa to rule, and how she continues to grow and learn through her experience. I think I forgot to mention she has a godstone in her belly button, which makes some villainous type people want her for the sole reason she does. They want the godstone, not her necessarily attached to it. They are both very good reads, the middle book doesn’t suffer the “middle child” syndrome, and the third, I think, is coming out the end of this year (The Bitter Kingdom?).more
Hrrr... I really enjoyed aspects of this book. First, I have deep respect for the world building, I have an interest in medieval Christianity and though this book is high fantasy (and "God" is not necessarily the early Christian concept of "God" or even necessarily any earthy concept of God), there's a close similarity in the physicality (blood and body) of the divine power of the 'soldiers of God'. I hate the pansy way some other people (authors) are dealing with religious lore... Seriously? Read the bible. Or, study the crusades... Yeah, not your local Christian rock band. Anyho I think this book does a good job of reflecting the morbid nature of a religious war fought by opposing fatalistic zealots, defended by the blood and flesh of a holy vassal (...type person).
I also respect this author's fearless taboo breaking: the character is over weight and has an over-eating disorder. Ok, I respect it, but I didn't really enjoy it. Nor how obsessively image conscious and self deprecating she is. I wouldn't change it... The author did a great job... But, I was just over it way before it ended.
Also, the character's dialogue clashes with the medieval culture and setting strongly. It's disconcerting.
smore
This was a pretty powerful, much less predictable teen fantasy read. I'm looking forward to seeing where this war torn world goes.  more
Read all 89 reviews

Reviews

4Q, 4PElisa is the second princess in the country of Orovalle. She will not be chosen as the ruler of Orovalle because on her naming day she became "The Chosen One". The bearer of the Godstone. As the bearer, she is committed to service. Service to God and her people. Elisa lives a rather sheltered life and those around her believe that she will not accomplish much. Elisa takes this and her perceived and actual cruel treatment of her older sister to heart. Elisa takes comfort in food and is overweight. As the story begins Elisa is married off to a king of another country at 16 and sent to go live with him. Upon the arrival to her new kindom, her kind and handsome husband, Alexander, begs her to keep their marriage and her identity as the bearer of the godstone a secret. Elisa does as he asks.When Elisa is kidnapped away from her new kingdom by an unlikely kidnapper she is faced with a difficult journey across deserts and time that changes her both physically and emotionally. The strength she gains throughout the story as she encounters death, war, love and family mirrors the writing in the The Girl of Fire and Thorns. Elisa's personal growth over time is a major strength to the story. She is a likable and sympathetic character that is smart, savvy and perceptive beyond her years.This novel is very well written with many unexpected plot turns. Another major strength of this story is the imagery that Carson creates. The details and dialogue are well woven and she leaves you wanting for more. Thank goodness this is the first in a trilogy.more
This review covers both the 1st and 2nd books (sort of) but mostly the first, and does contain some spoilers.
























These are pretty amazing books. Elisa, the heroine of the books, makes an incredible transformation from the beginning of the first book, where she is a chunky, still growing, still learning and not very self-confident girl, to one who can deal with whatever gets tossed at her, mostly because she’s stubborn, doesn’t want to get teased, and wants to prove she can do what everyone else can. So, while she bewails her fate at having to leave her father’s home where there are no challenges and life is easy, leaving is the best thing that could have happened to her. She is very close to her nurse, Ximena, who is truly her best advisor. Elisa faces bloody violence, the subterfuges of court, a husband who doesn’t love her and who keeps a mistress openly, kidnapping, and a whole host of problems she doesn’t know how to deal with, surrounded by people she doesn’t know and unsure of who to trust. An interesting issue that I only remember being brought up in one other book that I am trying to remember is the fact that part of Elisa’s transformation is brought about by tramping through the desert after being kidnapped. As she comes more to terms with who she is and what she can do, she loses the weight, it serves almost as literal emotional baggage. Even though she’s “acceptably thin” at the end (a little annoying) it’s because she’s gone through a transformation. Princess Ben—that’s the other one, a sort of fairy tale, that deals with the princesses’ weight issue, especially when her parents die and she has to learn how to run the kingdom—for her, food serves much the same purpose as it does Elisa—comfort. Small deviation there, just remembered that. CoE concentrates more on what it’s like for Elisa to rule, and how she continues to grow and learn through her experience. I think I forgot to mention she has a godstone in her belly button, which makes some villainous type people want her for the sole reason she does. They want the godstone, not her necessarily attached to it. They are both very good reads, the middle book doesn’t suffer the “middle child” syndrome, and the third, I think, is coming out the end of this year (The Bitter Kingdom?).more
Hrrr... I really enjoyed aspects of this book. First, I have deep respect for the world building, I have an interest in medieval Christianity and though this book is high fantasy (and "God" is not necessarily the early Christian concept of "God" or even necessarily any earthy concept of God), there's a close similarity in the physicality (blood and body) of the divine power of the 'soldiers of God'. I hate the pansy way some other people (authors) are dealing with religious lore... Seriously? Read the bible. Or, study the crusades... Yeah, not your local Christian rock band. Anyho I think this book does a good job of reflecting the morbid nature of a religious war fought by opposing fatalistic zealots, defended by the blood and flesh of a holy vassal (...type person).
I also respect this author's fearless taboo breaking: the character is over weight and has an over-eating disorder. Ok, I respect it, but I didn't really enjoy it. Nor how obsessively image conscious and self deprecating she is. I wouldn't change it... The author did a great job... But, I was just over it way before it ended.
Also, the character's dialogue clashes with the medieval culture and setting strongly. It's disconcerting.
smore
This was a pretty powerful, much less predictable teen fantasy read. I'm looking forward to seeing where this war torn world goes.  more
To be honest, I really did not think I would like this book. However, once I got to reading it, I read it to the end. more
Lots of action, intrigue, loveable and not-so-loveable characters; only a few sentences with any sexual overtones so okay for middle school readers as well.more
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