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Editor’s Note

“The Google Manual...”

Open Web advocate & prolific journalist Jarvis lifts the veil covering the world’s fastest growing company, outlining guidelines for success & revealing limitless possibilities.
Mallory F.
Scribd Editor

A bold and vital book that asks and answers the most urgent question of today: What Would Google Do?

In a book that's one part prophecy, one part thought experiment, one part manifesto, and one part survival manual, internet impresario and blogging pioneer Jeff Jarvis reverse-engineers Google—the fastest-growing company in history—to discover forty clear and straightforward rules to manage and live by. At the same time, he illuminates the new worldview of the internet generation: how it challenges and destroys, but also opens up vast new opportunities. His findings are counterintuitive, imaginative, practical, and above all visionary, giving readers a glimpse of how everyone and everything—from corporations to governments, nations to individuals—must evolve in the Google era.

Along the way, he looks under the hood of a car designed by its drivers, ponders a worldwide university where the students design their curriculum, envisions an airline fueled by a social network, imagines the open-source restaurant, and examines a series of industries and institutions that will soon benefit from this book's central question.

The result is an astonishing, mind-opening book that, in the end, is not about Google. It's about you.

Topics: Social Media, Innovation, The Internet, Web Development, Economy, Wealth, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Career, How-To Guides, Contemplative, Informative, and Success

Published: HarperCollins on Mar 17, 2009
ISBN: 9780061893933
List price: $9.99
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Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Jeff Jarvis' What Would Google Do? is more of an exploration of innovative business and leadership practices than it is an examination of Google. My worry had been that Jarvis' book might spend too much time fawning over Google, but for the most part, he avoids that and even manages to briefly discuss such warts as the whole China issue.Jarvis discusses how the world is becoming "googlier" in terms of becoming more networked, interactive, diffuse and innovative. The world of the future will be much more open to experimentation and even to acknowledged failure. In the future, we will need to listen to feedback much more closely than we have in the past and will also have to respond more agilely to these problems than we have in the past.Jarvis also offers suggestions for how other industries can get their googliness on. He looks at banking, health care, education, government, restaurants, and the like. The world he predicts will, from my perspective of education, be incredibly challenging. Schools tend to be rather traditionalist and authoritarian in their approach. Teachers have tended to act autonomously with little input from colleagues, students, or parents sought or expected. Teachers have been the source of all knowledge and authority. But as people come to expect different interactions with authorities, schools will be challenged. I don't quite know how we'll respond to these trends. I don't know that most schools are thinking about them except as remote intellectual thought-exercises. But as I read about the decline of the publishing industry, the movie industry, newspapers, music, and the like, I think we're avoiding something we can't really avoid.What Would Google Do? doesn't provide much in terms of specific answers, but it asks the right questions and provides some guideposts that we ignore at our own risk.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Three chapters into it and so far it's excellent. Great business ideas and the author is well on top of what's going on in business and social media.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was an interesting audiobook, and Jeff Jarvis, the author, did a good job as narrator. I enjoyed hearing about things through "Google lenses," since Google has grown by leaps and bounds. One point especially interesing to me was how Google's search page is so simple, but can take you to so many places, while Yahoo's home page is so crowded. Who's the market leader here?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
While Jarvis' insights were interesting, they weren't interesting enough to get me to finish the book. I think the problem for me was that the book was targeted more at the business community than at the casual observer. I'm conflicted. I suspect the book is very good, but it just didn't interest me enough. Ergo, the 4 star rating. 5 stars for probable content and 3 stars for average personal interest average out to 4 stars.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm putting this on my 'most highly recommended' list.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Thomas Elliott.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Google
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Jeff Jarvis' What Would Google Do? is more of an exploration of innovative business and leadership practices than it is an examination of Google. My worry had been that Jarvis' book might spend too much time fawning over Google, but for the most part, he avoids that and even manages to briefly discuss such warts as the whole China issue.Jarvis discusses how the world is becoming "googlier" in terms of becoming more networked, interactive, diffuse and innovative. The world of the future will be much more open to experimentation and even to acknowledged failure. In the future, we will need to listen to feedback much more closely than we have in the past and will also have to respond more agilely to these problems than we have in the past.Jarvis also offers suggestions for how other industries can get their googliness on. He looks at banking, health care, education, government, restaurants, and the like. The world he predicts will, from my perspective of education, be incredibly challenging. Schools tend to be rather traditionalist and authoritarian in their approach. Teachers have tended to act autonomously with little input from colleagues, students, or parents sought or expected. Teachers have been the source of all knowledge and authority. But as people come to expect different interactions with authorities, schools will be challenged. I don't quite know how we'll respond to these trends. I don't know that most schools are thinking about them except as remote intellectual thought-exercises. But as I read about the decline of the publishing industry, the movie industry, newspapers, music, and the like, I think we're avoiding something we can't really avoid.What Would Google Do? doesn't provide much in terms of specific answers, but it asks the right questions and provides some guideposts that we ignore at our own risk.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Three chapters into it and so far it's excellent. Great business ideas and the author is well on top of what's going on in business and social media.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was an interesting audiobook, and Jeff Jarvis, the author, did a good job as narrator. I enjoyed hearing about things through "Google lenses," since Google has grown by leaps and bounds. One point especially interesing to me was how Google's search page is so simple, but can take you to so many places, while Yahoo's home page is so crowded. Who's the market leader here?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
While Jarvis' insights were interesting, they weren't interesting enough to get me to finish the book. I think the problem for me was that the book was targeted more at the business community than at the casual observer. I'm conflicted. I suspect the book is very good, but it just didn't interest me enough. Ergo, the 4 star rating. 5 stars for probable content and 3 stars for average personal interest average out to 4 stars.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm putting this on my 'most highly recommended' list.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Thomas Elliott.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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