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In Giant, Plaxico Burress takes you into the locker room, onto the practice field, and into the huddle, providing a flat-out-honest look at life on and off the field with the New York Giants and at the making of a champion.

Throughout the 2007 season, Plaxico battled near-crippling injuries, and despite rarely practicing, being heavily bandaged, and on serious painkillers, he led the New York Giants in receptions, yards, and touchdowns. He continued to play through pain in the playoffs, only to be further injured before Super Bowl XLII. Playing the arrogant Patriots—who were inviting the Giants to their victory party before the game was over—Plaxico concealed a significant injury that might have changed the outcome of the game if the Pats had known.

When he first joined the Giants, Plaxico expected to be the go-to guy for the young quarterback Eli Manning. What he didn't expect was the media and fan scrutiny that was heaped on Manning as they battled to win games.

What Plaxico also didn't expect was the difficult relationship he had with head coach Tom Coughlin, who was a stickler for discipline and who would fine players for even the mildest offenses. For five years Plaxico had played for the laid-back Bill Cowher and the Pittsburgh Steelers. In contrast, within weeks of joining the Giants, Plaxico and Coughlin were butting heads, and the fines followed.

But there to make things a little easier were friends like Jeremy Shockey and Amani Toomer, nearly polar opposites. With Shock, everything was always full-tilt and his mouth would usually get him into trouble. Toomer was the easygoing elder statesman—at times absentminded, but a brilliant receiver.

And in 2007, Manning, with Plaxico's advice and support, would rise above the scrutinizing media and come into his own, and Coach Coughlin would relax his grip somewhat and let the team breathe. The results were obvious.

It's all here. The ups and downs, the trash-talking, the sweat and blood, and what it takes to be the best.

Topics: New York City Pro Sports Teams

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061983153
List price: $14.99
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I bought this one over five years ago while in Marfa, Texas visiting a friend from high school. Marfa was actually home base for the filming of the movie with Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean. I don't know why I put off reading this for so long since I really liked the movie and loved my stay in Texas. In any case, the book was far more enjoyable than I expected it to be, with (sadly) still-relevant commentary on class, gender, and immigration. Most of it consists of the viewpoint of an educated East Coast woman who marries a Texas rancher and her early impressions and observations of life in Texas. I liked both, but now that I've read it, I'd say that the film adaptation is well done, not too faithful, with some good narrative choices and framing decisions.more
Giant is Edna Ferber's classic novel about Virginia socialite Leslie Lynnton and her improbable marriage to Texan cattleman Jordan 'Bick' Bennedict. Pretty, refined and sharply intelligent, Leslie makes a stark contrast to her swaggering husband. Bick is the king of the million acre Reatta Ranch in Texas. Set after the end of the first World War, Bick has strong opinions about the place of women and everyone else in society. Taught to think for herself, Leslie struggles to adjust to the harsh Texas landscape and the social customs of the society she has married into.Fans of the movie Giant should be happily surprised that the movie followed the book so closely. Fans of Texas will probably be less pleased. While not a smear job, Giant does not always paint Anglo Texans in the most flattering light. Their destruction of the land through unsound farming and grazing practices is described. The inherent bigotry of the Mexican people is also relentlessly explored. The bigness, bragging, overheated egos, misogyny, friendliness, sense of family and custom and racism are all laid bare. Most startling is despite being written decades ago, many of the social themes of the novel still seem very much resonant today.more
Had to add this books again after deleting it. I am not keeping my copy because it is and old and worn paperback, but it was worth reading. I don't read much fiction, but I did like the movie and that drew me to the novel. It is an view of Texas, predjudice and how we have changed. Well, maybe not that much. I do recommend this book.more
The writing is so loaded with cliches, I have a hard time understanding how Ferber became an American literary giant. Still, she managed to keep me interested throughout the book. The movie is OK, and James Dean's performance as Jett Rink is brilliant, although much different and far less evil than the Rink of the novel.more
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Reviews

I bought this one over five years ago while in Marfa, Texas visiting a friend from high school. Marfa was actually home base for the filming of the movie with Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean. I don't know why I put off reading this for so long since I really liked the movie and loved my stay in Texas. In any case, the book was far more enjoyable than I expected it to be, with (sadly) still-relevant commentary on class, gender, and immigration. Most of it consists of the viewpoint of an educated East Coast woman who marries a Texas rancher and her early impressions and observations of life in Texas. I liked both, but now that I've read it, I'd say that the film adaptation is well done, not too faithful, with some good narrative choices and framing decisions.more
Giant is Edna Ferber's classic novel about Virginia socialite Leslie Lynnton and her improbable marriage to Texan cattleman Jordan 'Bick' Bennedict. Pretty, refined and sharply intelligent, Leslie makes a stark contrast to her swaggering husband. Bick is the king of the million acre Reatta Ranch in Texas. Set after the end of the first World War, Bick has strong opinions about the place of women and everyone else in society. Taught to think for herself, Leslie struggles to adjust to the harsh Texas landscape and the social customs of the society she has married into.Fans of the movie Giant should be happily surprised that the movie followed the book so closely. Fans of Texas will probably be less pleased. While not a smear job, Giant does not always paint Anglo Texans in the most flattering light. Their destruction of the land through unsound farming and grazing practices is described. The inherent bigotry of the Mexican people is also relentlessly explored. The bigness, bragging, overheated egos, misogyny, friendliness, sense of family and custom and racism are all laid bare. Most startling is despite being written decades ago, many of the social themes of the novel still seem very much resonant today.more
Had to add this books again after deleting it. I am not keeping my copy because it is and old and worn paperback, but it was worth reading. I don't read much fiction, but I did like the movie and that drew me to the novel. It is an view of Texas, predjudice and how we have changed. Well, maybe not that much. I do recommend this book.more
The writing is so loaded with cliches, I have a hard time understanding how Ferber became an American literary giant. Still, she managed to keep me interested throughout the book. The movie is OK, and James Dean's performance as Jett Rink is brilliant, although much different and far less evil than the Rink of the novel.more
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