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Troubled young Fawn Bluefield seeks a life beyond her family’s farm. But en route to the city, she encounters a patrol of Lakewalkers, nomadic soldier–sorcerers from the northern woodlands. Feared necromancers armed with mysterious knives made of human bone, they wage a secret, ongoing war against the scourge of the "malices," immortal entities that draw the life out of their victims, enslaving human and animal alike.

It is Dag—a Lakewalker patroller weighed down by past sorrows and onerous present responsibilities—who must come to Fawn’s aid when she is taken captive by a malice. They prevail at a devastating cost—unexpectedly binding their fates as they embark upon a remarkable journey into danger and delight, prejudice and partnership . . . and perhaps even love.

Topics: Monsters, Necromancy, Wizards, Supernatural Powers, Magical Objects, Forbidden Love, Adventurous, Romantic, Epic, Series, and Kidnapping

Published: HarperCollins on Sep 28, 2006
ISBN: 9780061796753
List price: $3.99
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I thoroughly enjoyed this book and am looking forward to reading the rest of the series. I listened to this as an audiobook a couple of years ago, but while I remembered enjoying the story, I couldn't remember too many particulars. I'm now excited to be caught up, so that I can enjoy the next audiobook in the series.

I love how internal Fawn and Dag's journey together really is; there are so many outside obstacles for them to overcome, but the biggest changes that they each experience have to do with how they mature, deal with pain, and make room in their lives for the unexpected love that they encounter.

While I love how quickly I can read this in (digital) print, I love the way Bernadette Dunne, the woman who narrates the audiobooks, reads the stories. No matter how you take it in, this series is a treat for the eyes and the ears.read more
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Bujold and romance, what better way to refresh a tired heart!read more
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The Sharing Knife: Beguilement by Lois McMaster Bujold (8/10)Fantasy/Romance. Bujold has said this book was an opportunity to play and see if she could write a story where the romance gets less overshadowed by the plot and characters, as usually happens with her. I think she's done a good job, although the book doesn't feel as if it has quite as much depth as some ofher others. All the same, the world building set up is solid, the characters are nice people and I look forward to the rest of the story. The book was cut in half for length reasons and it does stop rather abruptly with a lot of the romance sorted out but most of the plot still awaiting its turn, so it's worth being aware of that when you start reading. The second half, The Sharing Knife: Legacy, comes out next year.read more
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I thoroughly enjoyed this book and am looking forward to reading the rest of the series. I listened to this as an audiobook a couple of years ago, but while I remembered enjoying the story, I couldn't remember too many particulars. I'm now excited to be caught up, so that I can enjoy the next audiobook in the series.

I love how internal Fawn and Dag's journey together really is; there are so many outside obstacles for them to overcome, but the biggest changes that they each experience have to do with how they mature, deal with pain, and make room in their lives for the unexpected love that they encounter.

While I love how quickly I can read this in (digital) print, I love the way Bernadette Dunne, the woman who narrates the audiobooks, reads the stories. No matter how you take it in, this series is a treat for the eyes and the ears.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Bujold and romance, what better way to refresh a tired heart!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Sharing Knife: Beguilement by Lois McMaster Bujold (8/10)Fantasy/Romance. Bujold has said this book was an opportunity to play and see if she could write a story where the romance gets less overshadowed by the plot and characters, as usually happens with her. I think she's done a good job, although the book doesn't feel as if it has quite as much depth as some ofher others. All the same, the world building set up is solid, the characters are nice people and I look forward to the rest of the story. The book was cut in half for length reasons and it does stop rather abruptly with a lot of the romance sorted out but most of the plot still awaiting its turn, so it's worth being aware of that when you start reading. The second half, The Sharing Knife: Legacy, comes out next year.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Call me hopeful, but I'm ideally looking for a mix of sci-fi and romance in the same novel. It's always interesting to have a major sci-fi plotline with a minor romance thread running through it. So, I thought I'd hit the jack-pot when I came across Louis McMaster Bujold's "The Sharing Knife" series". I mean Bujold ! That Hugo winner! She writing a sci-fi novel which features romance - what could be better than that ? Many things, it now appears.You're probably getting my drift by now, but let me inflict a philosophical euphemism on you at this point : Most things in life are not that easily gotten. Ergo : I'm disappointed in the first book - Beguilement. Yes, it had new ideas of fantasy, but it read almost like a romance novel, and not the nice kinds (read : woman has spine) either. No, really !The woman here is Dawn Blufield, all of 18 years. She's run away from home, because she's gotten pregnant by a local boy, who's refusing responsibility, and being generally mean and nasty. Also, desis hold up your heads now, because izzat and honor, and blaming the woman are apparently world-wide concepts, known also to the farmers of this novel. Thus Dawn, mortified by her parent’s embarrassment if they found out has hit the road.The hero is 55 year old Dag, who's a Lakewalker Patroller. Lakewalkers are people who guard the common folk against malices and blight bogles, which are evil monsters that suck up your "ground" or life-force. Lakewalkers have an acute sense of others’ "ground", i.e.; they can sense happiness, sadness and rough edges in the ebb and flow of your life-force. So, Dag can sense Dawn's "ground" , and she shines so brightly in it, that he calls her "(Little) Spark". (Oh, kill me now !)OK, so now the story : Dawn meets Dag. Dag secretly smitten. Enter Malice. Dag to the rescue. And then the event that propels the story (or at least that's what I thought) : Dawn uses the wrong Sharing Knife on the Malice, and it mistakenly gets "primed". That is a problem, because it has been "primed" with her now dead baby's ground (she aborts due to the malice's man-handling of her) and the baby hadn't even been born yet. Dag doesn't know what implications this has, because Sharing Knives are "primed" with Lakewalker "ground" and done by the LakeWalkers themselves. So, he persuades Dawn to come with them to his LakeWalker Patrol so that someone more knowledgeable about Sharing Knives, a Maker for instance, can find out.Well, I thought that the "finding out" would be done quickly and then the story would proceed in a sci-fi-ish manner. But, instead, the rest of the book is devoted to Dawn and Dag making the journey to her home, to clear up the air so to speak, and falling in love along the way.Now, I have no problem with romance (in fact quite the contrary), but let's not act like lovesick teenagers here. The book, at this point has become quite Mills-and-Boon-ish in character. Dag, is the older, wiser, and worldlier of the two, and he longs to cherish her and protect her, blah blah blah . . . And she, actually is a teenager, vastly under-esteemed by her family, and forever taunted by her various siblings. But, but, but . . . she's earnest and intelligent and kind and compassionate . . . And this really is true-blue love, where they communicate via ESP. OK, then !This isn't quite what I expected. If I did want to read a love story about a much older, more powerful man, who wanted to protect and cherish this wispy little woman with a heart of gold and a large brood of (nasty/dependent) siblings, I would go read Betty Neels instead. Granted, from what I can recall, her heroes are almost always handsome Dutch Doctors , and Dag is of unknown country, he sounds fairly Scandinavian to me - close enough, no ?The book, like the rest of us, is not all bad. The characters are well-drawn – I liked Dag’s character quite a bit; he has his head screwed on right, has no fixed notions of “women’s” work since he actually nurses Dawn through her miscarriage. This might be due to the fact that his LakeWalker culture as portrayed is matriarchial, sort-of; when a man and woman are bound together, the man comes to the woman’s family tent and not the other way around. Plus he seems fairly liberal, except in the parts where he goes around calling her “Little Spark” :-) .Dawn is a likeable character too, I only wish she wasn’t so small and petite, and needing to be “protected”. How about a 6’ woman with self-esteem issues – now you could really introduce some interesting psycho-babble there!As a romance novel, this one isn’t so bad, but coming from the likes of Bujold, as highly regarded in the sci-fi genre as she is, this is a massive disappointment. This is a sometimes cringe-worthy, and sometimes awkwardly lovey-dovey novel in the guise of a sci-fi tome.When I ended the book, I was actually quite amazed that this was the work of a Hugo winner. But after reading a few reviews on the net, I am convinced that there are a lot more folks just as put off by this book as I am, and that Bujold is quite at the nadir of her form here. Hopefully, her other books will be better !
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This book is fantasy, unrelated to her other series. Now, I love Bujold, I could read her books over and over. I devoured this book in a few hours. But I have to say that this is the fluffiest Bujold book I can remember reading. Yes, much fluffier than A Civil Campaign--that had some meaty political sparring to offset the romance. The main struggle with the deadly whatsit comes very early in this book, and the rest is devoted to the evolving romance of the two leads. There is conflict later, but it is more a conflict over social expectations. Quite clearly the first book in a series, with the main conflicts over the horizon. One hopes. Don't get me wrong, I squee'd and sighed over the fluffy romance, it was charming. The characters are engaging, the world/setting is interesting, and the writing was as crisp as ever. I just wonder about where the overall plot's going.
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Fawn Bluefield wants out of her family farm and into the outside world and Dag, a Lakewalker patroller attracts her and takes her under his wing. Lakewalkers are waging a war against "malices". Malices are immortal entities who draw life out of people and make them into warped versions of themselves.When Fawn is taken by malices Dag has to rescue her and this changes their relationship forever.Bujold is a great writer and I have never been disappointed by her, this is no exception.
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