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In Why We Run, biologist, award-winning nature writer, and ultramarathoner Bernd Heinrich explores a new perspective on human evolution by examining the phenomenon of ultraendurance and makes surprising discoveries about the physical, spiritual -- and primal -- drive to win. At once lyrical and scientific, Why We Run shows Heinrich's signature blend of biology, anthropology, psychology, and philosophy, infused with his passion to discover how and why we can achieve superhuman abilities.

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 6, 2009
ISBN: 9780061979996
List price: $6.99
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way to scientific for an enjoyable experience . read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
When I picked up this book I was expecting a anthropological and biological look at running. What I got was several chapters of the author's history, which was interesting, but not what I was in the mood for at the time. Finally in the seventh or eighth chapter the book took a turn more to my liking. I found parts of this book extremely interesting. Especially the biological adaptations contrasted in the pronghorn antelope and the camel. Also the theory of why we came to run, namely "persistence scavenging" (my term) and "persistence hunting." The book made me laugh a couple times as well. It ends with a description of his training for an ultramarathon and experience of the subsequent race. Both descriptions left me with respect for the author and an insight into the grit it takes to be a runner.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you like long-distance running. Or, if you're obsessed by it. This is the book to read. "I decided to enter the race, and, if possible, win it." It still sends shivers down my spine.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

way to scientific for an enjoyable experience .
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
When I picked up this book I was expecting a anthropological and biological look at running. What I got was several chapters of the author's history, which was interesting, but not what I was in the mood for at the time. Finally in the seventh or eighth chapter the book took a turn more to my liking. I found parts of this book extremely interesting. Especially the biological adaptations contrasted in the pronghorn antelope and the camel. Also the theory of why we came to run, namely "persistence scavenging" (my term) and "persistence hunting." The book made me laugh a couple times as well. It ends with a description of his training for an ultramarathon and experience of the subsequent race. Both descriptions left me with respect for the author and an insight into the grit it takes to be a runner.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you like long-distance running. Or, if you're obsessed by it. This is the book to read. "I decided to enter the race, and, if possible, win it." It still sends shivers down my spine.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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