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Does capitalism promote greed? Can a person follow Jesus's call to love others and also support capitalism? Was our recent economic crisis caused by flaws inherent to our free market system? Jay Richards presents a new approach to capitalism, revealing how it's fully consistent with Jesus's teachings and the Christian tradition, while also showing why this system is our best bet for renewed economic vigor.

The church is bombarded with two competing messages about money and capitalism:

  • wealth is bad and causes much of the world's suffering
  • wealth is good and God wants you to prosper and be rich

Richards exposes these myths, and other common misconceptions about capitalism, and reveals the surprising ways that capitalism is, in fact, the best system to respond to the biblical mandates of alleviating poverty and protecting the environment. Money, Greed, and God equips readers to take practical steps in their own lives to conduct business, worship God, and serve others without falling into the "prosperity gospel" trap.

Topics: Capitalism, Politics, Ethics, and The Environment

Published: HarperCollins on May 5, 2009
ISBN: 9780061874567
List price: $10.39
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Richards points out the Christianity has always seemed conflicted in its attitude toward wealth, if it is good or evil. In this short set of essays he sets out to show the conflict is not valid. He approaches the problem by resolving problems associated with errors that he organizes under eight myths. Along the way he describes his own maturing from a socialist, almost communist, and Rand objectivist to a conservative capitalist.Supporting his arguments with numerous biblical references he validates private property. With reference to many philosophers and economists he validates free-market capitalism. His major victory is to demonstrate that a good Christian can also be a good capitalist.While I agree with his approach, and found this an enjoyable read, I found myself in disagreement with a number of his observations about economics. This is very much a work for interested Christians. While it may help to improve an economist's view of some issues in terms of specific audiences, they will be mostly dissatisfied.read more
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Richards points out the Christianity has always seemed conflicted in its attitude toward wealth, if it is good or evil. In this short set of essays he sets out to show the conflict is not valid. He approaches the problem by resolving problems associated with errors that he organizes under eight myths. Along the way he describes his own maturing from a socialist, almost communist, and Rand objectivist to a conservative capitalist.Supporting his arguments with numerous biblical references he validates private property. With reference to many philosophers and economists he validates free-market capitalism. His major victory is to demonstrate that a good Christian can also be a good capitalist.While I agree with his approach, and found this an enjoyable read, I found myself in disagreement with a number of his observations about economics. This is very much a work for interested Christians. While it may help to improve an economist's view of some issues in terms of specific audiences, they will be mostly dissatisfied.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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