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From seat No. 9, Hercule Poirot is almost ideally placed to observe his fellow air travelers on this short flight from Paris to London. Over to his right sits a pretty young woman, clearly infatuated with the man opposite. Ahead, in seat No. 13, is the Countess of Horbury, horribly addicted to cocaine and not doing too good a job of concealing it. Across the gangway in seat No. 8, a writer of detective fiction is being troubled by an aggressive wasp. Yes, Poirot is almost ideally placed to take it all in—except that the passenger in the seat directly behind him has slumped over in the course of the flight . . . dead. Murdered. By someone in Poirot's immediate proximity. And Poirot himself must number among the suspects.

Topics: Paris, London, Suspenseful, Tense, Airplanes, Murder, Crime, Private Investigators, Death, Series, 20th Century, 1930s, Female Author, and British Author

Published: HarperCollins on Feb 10, 2010
ISBN: 9780061743115
List price: $4.99
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This is a fascinating novel from a number of points of view.To start with, because of its setting, it is very obviously a "locked room" mystery. If Mme Giselle's death is murder then the murderer has to have been on the plane. Hercule Poirot, that inveterate sufferer from mal-de-mer, is concentrating on not being a victim of mal-de-air, and feels a great deal of chagrin that murder has taken place under his very nose, or to be more precise, under his closed eyes.For air travellers amongst us, travel on this plane was very different, and much more in keeping with travelling by train or by steamer. To start with luggage, rugs and other paraphernalia are heaped rather untidily at the end of the cabin, which Agatha Christie keeps calling a "car".At the front of the book is a diagram of the rear "car" of the plane Prometheus, which clearly shows that some of the seats are arranged in "facing" sets of 4.And just a final point about this setting - the windows of the plane have little air vents, big enough to have passed a blow pipe through. They obviously didn't fly at 37,000 feet.The investigation of the murder is jointly conducted by Poirot, the French detective Fournier and Inspector Japp from Scotland Yard, and each brings a different quality to its conduct. Poirot and Fournier are both interested in the psychology of crime.In the following Poirot, Fournier and Japp are talking about perception, and how we interpret what happens in the light of other observations (or perhaps what we don't notice)Fournier says .... when a lady dies suddenly of heart failure, if a man is to drop his handkerchief and stoop to pick it up, who will notice the action or think twice about it?I really enjoyed the interaction between these 3.Finally we see a further development of the romantic side of Hercule Poirot's character, when he lets a society lady off lightly and gives a young orphan a gentle push towards love.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked this one a lot, but I did catch on to who the murderer was by the end. So either I'm getting better at this, or Christie was weaker - you be the judge! It is definitely classic Poirot and a must read for Christie fans.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is classic Christie - a murder in an enclosed space with a limited number of suspects. Poirot tracks down the murderer, of course, ably assisted by two suspects in the murder who can't have done it - or could they? Fantastic.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is a great and clever mystery with a colorful story and detailed characters...especially Mr.poiritread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Since 2008 I have been trying to make my way through all the Agatha Christie mysteries. After spending several years reading here and there I am now trying to read the missing ones in order. The next one on my list was DEATH IN THE CLOUDS.DEATH IN THE CLOUDS sees the infamous Hercule Poirot spending a plane ride, with passengers unknown, and witnesses a murder. As he goes about using his "little grey cells" and collecting clues, he tries to figure out just who killed the poor woman.For me, there is no greater crime writer than Agatha Christie. All of her mysteries keep me glued to every page. I'm always wanting to read "just one more page!" DEATH IN THE CLOUDS is no exception to this. I was completely glued to the story, as Hercule Poirot, with the assistance of Inspector Japp and another passenger, Jane Grey, tried to find out the answer to this crime.I have a love/hate relationship with Hercules Poirot. I do favour Miss Marple, and find that sometimes Poirot's ego gets the better of him. However, DEATH IN THE CLOUDS might be the exception to that. Poirot's ego didn't hardly make much of an appearance, and it was all in all a reading experience, alongside Poirot. For fan's of Poirot, there is were definitely many Poirot-ism's, but without the ultra ego trip he usually plays.I highly recommend DEATH IN THE CLOUDS to mystery/crime fans. It will definitely keep you guessing to the last page. Even though I did guess the murderer close to the end, I was hanging onto the very last sentence to see how it all intertwined together. As I said no-one writes a complex, interesting mystery like Agatha Christie does.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great period piece. A murder is committed right under Poirot's airsick nose on a cross channel plane. Many on board prove to have had a motive, can Poirot see his way to itdentifying the real killer? Good fun early Poirot with a nice flavour of early air travel glamour.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It's almost always easy to read an Agatha Christie in one sitting. (So far, the only mysteries of AC's that took me a long time to read are the Jane Marple mysteries). Hercule Poirot is always engaging (so far).

Death in the Clouds tackles the usual elements of AC's, psychology, the multiple suspects, the red herrings, etc. And the romance sub-plot is always welcome. The plot twist was good, but since I read Cards on the Table, it doesn't compare to that.

It was a pleasant interlude after reading "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" which was more of a heavy - but pleasant - reading.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Probably one of the more famous Poirot books by Agatha Christie. I consider this to be a good solid one of the mysteries. If one compares them closely with newer Murder Mysteries it will seem a little quaint and Poirot a little to self indulgent but that is part of the charm.Poirot is flying back from Paris when a woman is murdered on the same plane just a few seats away. Due to motion sickness Poirot was trying to sleep through the flight and didn't see anything but was none-the-less upset about this deed happening right under his nose.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A passenger is murdered on a flight from Paris to London. Unfortunately for the murderer, Hercule Poirot is also a passenger on the flight. Both French and British authorities are involved with the investigation, but neither are a match for the little grey cells of Hercule Poirot.Agatha Christie must have had fun writing this one, as the passengers include a mystery novelist and a pair of archaeologists. (Christie's second husband was an archaeologist.) If you haven't yet read any of Christie's novels, this would be a great place to start!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

This is a fascinating novel from a number of points of view.To start with, because of its setting, it is very obviously a "locked room" mystery. If Mme Giselle's death is murder then the murderer has to have been on the plane. Hercule Poirot, that inveterate sufferer from mal-de-mer, is concentrating on not being a victim of mal-de-air, and feels a great deal of chagrin that murder has taken place under his very nose, or to be more precise, under his closed eyes.For air travellers amongst us, travel on this plane was very different, and much more in keeping with travelling by train or by steamer. To start with luggage, rugs and other paraphernalia are heaped rather untidily at the end of the cabin, which Agatha Christie keeps calling a "car".At the front of the book is a diagram of the rear "car" of the plane Prometheus, which clearly shows that some of the seats are arranged in "facing" sets of 4.And just a final point about this setting - the windows of the plane have little air vents, big enough to have passed a blow pipe through. They obviously didn't fly at 37,000 feet.The investigation of the murder is jointly conducted by Poirot, the French detective Fournier and Inspector Japp from Scotland Yard, and each brings a different quality to its conduct. Poirot and Fournier are both interested in the psychology of crime.In the following Poirot, Fournier and Japp are talking about perception, and how we interpret what happens in the light of other observations (or perhaps what we don't notice)Fournier says .... when a lady dies suddenly of heart failure, if a man is to drop his handkerchief and stoop to pick it up, who will notice the action or think twice about it?I really enjoyed the interaction between these 3.Finally we see a further development of the romantic side of Hercule Poirot's character, when he lets a society lady off lightly and gives a young orphan a gentle push towards love.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I liked this one a lot, but I did catch on to who the murderer was by the end. So either I'm getting better at this, or Christie was weaker - you be the judge! It is definitely classic Poirot and a must read for Christie fans.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is classic Christie - a murder in an enclosed space with a limited number of suspects. Poirot tracks down the murderer, of course, ably assisted by two suspects in the murder who can't have done it - or could they? Fantastic.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is a great and clever mystery with a colorful story and detailed characters...especially Mr.poirit
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Since 2008 I have been trying to make my way through all the Agatha Christie mysteries. After spending several years reading here and there I am now trying to read the missing ones in order. The next one on my list was DEATH IN THE CLOUDS.DEATH IN THE CLOUDS sees the infamous Hercule Poirot spending a plane ride, with passengers unknown, and witnesses a murder. As he goes about using his "little grey cells" and collecting clues, he tries to figure out just who killed the poor woman.For me, there is no greater crime writer than Agatha Christie. All of her mysteries keep me glued to every page. I'm always wanting to read "just one more page!" DEATH IN THE CLOUDS is no exception to this. I was completely glued to the story, as Hercule Poirot, with the assistance of Inspector Japp and another passenger, Jane Grey, tried to find out the answer to this crime.I have a love/hate relationship with Hercules Poirot. I do favour Miss Marple, and find that sometimes Poirot's ego gets the better of him. However, DEATH IN THE CLOUDS might be the exception to that. Poirot's ego didn't hardly make much of an appearance, and it was all in all a reading experience, alongside Poirot. For fan's of Poirot, there is were definitely many Poirot-ism's, but without the ultra ego trip he usually plays.I highly recommend DEATH IN THE CLOUDS to mystery/crime fans. It will definitely keep you guessing to the last page. Even though I did guess the murderer close to the end, I was hanging onto the very last sentence to see how it all intertwined together. As I said no-one writes a complex, interesting mystery like Agatha Christie does.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great period piece. A murder is committed right under Poirot's airsick nose on a cross channel plane. Many on board prove to have had a motive, can Poirot see his way to itdentifying the real killer? Good fun early Poirot with a nice flavour of early air travel glamour.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It's almost always easy to read an Agatha Christie in one sitting. (So far, the only mysteries of AC's that took me a long time to read are the Jane Marple mysteries). Hercule Poirot is always engaging (so far).

Death in the Clouds tackles the usual elements of AC's, psychology, the multiple suspects, the red herrings, etc. And the romance sub-plot is always welcome. The plot twist was good, but since I read Cards on the Table, it doesn't compare to that.

It was a pleasant interlude after reading "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" which was more of a heavy - but pleasant - reading.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Probably one of the more famous Poirot books by Agatha Christie. I consider this to be a good solid one of the mysteries. If one compares them closely with newer Murder Mysteries it will seem a little quaint and Poirot a little to self indulgent but that is part of the charm.Poirot is flying back from Paris when a woman is murdered on the same plane just a few seats away. Due to motion sickness Poirot was trying to sleep through the flight and didn't see anything but was none-the-less upset about this deed happening right under his nose.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A passenger is murdered on a flight from Paris to London. Unfortunately for the murderer, Hercule Poirot is also a passenger on the flight. Both French and British authorities are involved with the investigation, but neither are a match for the little grey cells of Hercule Poirot.Agatha Christie must have had fun writing this one, as the passengers include a mystery novelist and a pair of archaeologists. (Christie's second husband was an archaeologist.) If you haven't yet read any of Christie's novels, this would be a great place to start!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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