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Maybe the Moon, Armistead Maupin's first novel since ending his bestselling Tales of the City series, is the audaciously original chronicle of Cadence Roth -- Hollywood actress, singer, iconoclast and former Guiness Book record holder as the world's shortest woman.

All of 31 inches tall, Cady is a true survivor in a town where -- as she says -- "you can die of encouragement." Her early starring role as a lovable elf in an immensely popular American film proved a major disappointment, since moviegoers never saw the face behind the stifling rubber suit she was required to wear. Now, after a decade of hollow promises from the Industry, she is reduced to performing at birthday parties and bat mitzvahs as she waits for the miracle that will finally make her a star.

In a series of mordantly funny journal entries, Maupin tracks his spunky heroine across the saffron-hazed wasteland of Los Angeles -- from her all-too-infrequent meetings with agents and studio moguls to her regular harrowing encounters with small children, large dogs and human ignorance. Then one day a lanky piano player saunters into Cady's life, unleashing heady new emotions, and she finds herself going for broke, shooting the moon with a scheme so harebrained and daring that it just might succeed. Her accomplice in the venture is her best friend, Jeff, a gay waiter who sees Cady's struggle for visibility as a natural extension of his own war against the Hollywood Closet.

As clear-eyed as it is charming, Maybe the Moon is a modern parable about the mythology of the movies and the toll it exacts from it participants on both sides of the screen. It is a work that speaks to the resilience of the human spirit from a perspective rarely found in literature.

Topics: Film

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061844270
List price: $8.99
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I read this (I being Mrs R.) because I'm on a speculative-fiction which contains major-characters-with-disabilities. I started to build my reading list by looking at what had been tagged 'disabled' or 'disability' and one of those sf phrases. This one, someone has tagged 'magic realism'.Weell, yes. I suppose so. This is not, however, Nights at the Circus (although, I think, as good).So, not _real_ Magic Realism. If you don't like speculative fiction, don't let the taint of fairies put you off! If you do like mr and other forms of sf, on the other hand, and are interested in disability, then I strongly recommend this too.Oddly, I was in a bookstore mentioned in this book, in the year in question. I think back: did I see Cady? If I had done, what would she have seen in me?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Coming to this book after reading "Tales of the City", I was expecting an entertaining, possible endearing read. However, I was very disappointed. "Maybe the Moon" has not inspired nor captivated a sliver of my attention.Apparently, this novel is a "roman a clef"; but the true identity is so well hidden, and the character behind the personage is so obscure that this never becomes clear. In the mean time, the reader keeps wondering why we are reading a book about "a female heterosexual Jewish dwarf".Why on earth? Opening up to lesbian readership? Trying to imitate John Irving (not nearly as entertaining).It all seems to be very well-written, but I have no idea what the book is about.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I picked this book up at the English speaking meetup in Vienna and I finished it in 3 days. It's one of those books I read on the subway and looked up and thought:"Oh no, I'm here already!".The book is great, I love how the character is strong, brave, and has a self-deprecating humour but never gets whiny or annoying. I've never read a book told from the first person perspective before that pulled this off as well as Maybe the Moon.I even got excited on Casey's behalf before her big appearance. I found the story to be powerful. And the letters at the end of the book make it even more powerful.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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I read this (I being Mrs R.) because I'm on a speculative-fiction which contains major-characters-with-disabilities. I started to build my reading list by looking at what had been tagged 'disabled' or 'disability' and one of those sf phrases. This one, someone has tagged 'magic realism'.Weell, yes. I suppose so. This is not, however, Nights at the Circus (although, I think, as good).So, not _real_ Magic Realism. If you don't like speculative fiction, don't let the taint of fairies put you off! If you do like mr and other forms of sf, on the other hand, and are interested in disability, then I strongly recommend this too.Oddly, I was in a bookstore mentioned in this book, in the year in question. I think back: did I see Cady? If I had done, what would she have seen in me?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Coming to this book after reading "Tales of the City", I was expecting an entertaining, possible endearing read. However, I was very disappointed. "Maybe the Moon" has not inspired nor captivated a sliver of my attention.Apparently, this novel is a "roman a clef"; but the true identity is so well hidden, and the character behind the personage is so obscure that this never becomes clear. In the mean time, the reader keeps wondering why we are reading a book about "a female heterosexual Jewish dwarf".Why on earth? Opening up to lesbian readership? Trying to imitate John Irving (not nearly as entertaining).It all seems to be very well-written, but I have no idea what the book is about.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I picked this book up at the English speaking meetup in Vienna and I finished it in 3 days. It's one of those books I read on the subway and looked up and thought:"Oh no, I'm here already!".The book is great, I love how the character is strong, brave, and has a self-deprecating humour but never gets whiny or annoying. I've never read a book told from the first person perspective before that pulled this off as well as Maybe the Moon.I even got excited on Casey's behalf before her big appearance. I found the story to be powerful. And the letters at the end of the book make it even more powerful.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Maupin's books are always chatty & fun, like letters from friends. His characters are a lot like the people you know. This is even true of the lead character in this book, who is both dwarf and diva. She's witty, cynical, and has a unique take on the world, and when the book ends, you miss her.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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