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Growing up in a family of political journalists—and daughter of President Reagan’s White House social secretary—Ali Wentworth rebelled against her blue-blood upbringing, embracing Hollywood, motorcycles, even a few wildly inappropriate marriage proposals. Today she is an acclaimed comedic actress and writer, former Oprah regular, wife of political and media star George Stephanopoulos, and a mother who lets her two girls eat cotton candy before bed. Though she’s settled down, her rebellious nature thrives in her comedy and her view of her crazy world.

In this addictively funny and warm memoir, she takes us through the looking glass and into the wonderland of her life, from a childhood among Washington’s elite to a stint in the psych ward they called a New England prep school; days doing L.A. sketch comedy (with then-aspiring artists Will Ferrell and Lisa Kudrow) to a series of spectacularly failed loves (that eventually led her to Mr. Right). Constant throughout is her mother, Muffie—a flawlessly elegant yet firm, no-nonsense force of nature and pure WASP convictions.

As charming and off-the-wall as Ali herself, Ali in Wonderland is an entertaining look at life that is both intimate and hilarious.

Topics: Celebrities, Politics, Boarding School, Fame, Mothers and Daughters, Funny, United States of America, and Rebellion

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062098092
List price: $10.99
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I thoroughly enjoy Bukowski's work, but I got tired of Bukowksi's prose two thirds of the way into the novel. The writing becomes terse and Bukowski's blunt simplicity becomes tiresome after he describes the same "types" of scenes over and over.

I still ate up the book in a couple of days. This book is quite satirical and boarders the surreal. I love how Bukowski's characters speak about arbitrary subjects, and somehow, these arbritray subjects characterizes their speakers perfectly.

It's an interesting and wobbly travail down Bukowski Road. That man sure had some devoted fans that put up with a lot of shit to be in his presence.more
An 18+ novel that reads like a children's book. This autobiographical recollection of Bukowski's encounter with woman after woman after woman (after woman) doesn't have a specific message, but it serves as a brutally honest look at the character's degenerate lifestyle as a womanizing alcoholic. Chinaski often questions why women give him the time of day, given he's a total low-life...but whatever he's doing as a newly famous poet certainly is garnering attention from ladies far more interesting than he. The contrast between his pathetic ways and the lifestyles of some of the women that pursue him is large (belly dancers, health nuts, promoters, etc.).I can't say I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was interesting to read about the ease with which Chinaski beds women, but the plot repeats itself over and over again with a new woman each time until finally he's forced to realize that he's a scumbag and that he needs to change his ways and treat women with respect and dignity. I can't say I got much out of it, except for a few laughs and one particularly striking characteristic: amidst all the drinking, sex, and laziness that is Chinaski's life and thought process, we are hit with "pangs" of wisdom and emotional introspection about both himself and society. As though throughout the monotonous life of drinking and affairs, there's still a true human being somewhere in there. Wouldn't read again.more
Pure crap.And I love his poetry.I even enjoyed Post Office and Factotum. But this novel just shows what a miserable human being he was. He was vain. He was selfish. He objectified women. Just take this snippet:At ten AM I went down for breakfast. I found Pete and Selma. Selma looked great. How did one get a Selma? The dogs of this world never ended up with a Selma. Dogs ended up with dogs. Selma served us breakfast. She was beautiful and one man owned her, a college professor. That was not quite right, somehow. Educated hotshot smoothies. Education was the new god, and educated men the new plantation masters. Seriously? This book removed Bukowski from my favorite authors list.At least he was honest.He was right: Dogs end up with dogs.more
Women finds Bukowski (or Chinaski) after he has arrived as a novelist and poet. It's sort of like Factotum except instead of going through a bunch of jobs, he goes through a bunch of women. It doesn't quite reach the high water mark of Factotum, though, because the sex in that smaller book is sexy and the low-life of Chinaski works well with the people he interacts with. In fact, I'm going to have to read Factotum again, probably. Anyways, his trademarks are certainly there in this book, they're just not shown to his best like Ham On Rye.more
Very good. Read it on a snowboard trip to Whistler. Had me laughing out loud and reading passages to Thanos, and you should have seen his eyes pop when he realized that there are actually BOOKS about this kind of stuff. Classic Bukowski.more
This holds a special place for me as the first Bukowski novel I ever read. Much has been said about Bukowski the poet but as a novelist he is equally thought-provoking.more
Charles Bukowski writes about a time in his life when his success as a writer attracts many women. And, like a sex-starved teenager, he takes advantage of every opportunity. Bukowski's addict character Chinaski boozes and fucks his way through a sequence of short-lived relationships. Some of these end messily, some cordially. Most end some time after the next has begun. They become a little repetitive after a while: Chinaski gets some fan mail, agrees to meet the woman at the airport; they drink and have sex. Bukowski describes the women, the sex, and himself unflinchingly and unflatteringly but with some humour. I quite liked his honesty. He avoids other writers (and people in general) but when he does encounter others' writings or poems he is straight and objective in his assessment of their work. Chinaski does not reform; he is happy with his drinking and his low, seedy, misanthropic lifestyle. At the end however he gives a hint of becoming slightly less selfish.more
I finished to read "Ask The Dust", by John Fante, when was suggested me to read this book. It's really similar, but Henry Chinaski has something different from the other guy. He's more unusual, more shameless, seems to be more talented and lucky. I like the way he moves from one situation to another, and, in the middle of the book, you're tempted to live like him. In the final, you start to think if you really wanna live like this... So different and absolutely crazy women, in a world of drugs, with no rules and minimal worrings seems to be interessant... At certain point.more
The semi-autobiographical tale of Henry "Hank" Chinaski, a self-described "dirty old man," an alcoholic misogynist loner semi-famous poet with bad teeth, an ugly face, poor fashion, great legs, and an uncanny ability to attract women twenty to thirty years younger than himself. The story follows Hank through his exploits with women, so numerous that by the end of the book you've lost track of how many he's been with and anything about their personality. Hank is a "researcher" of women, trying to learn about their essence through relationships varying from a sight-unseen two-and-a-half year marriage to the several day tryst. In addition to being a ladies man, Hank is also a prodigious drinker, mostly it seems of beer and vodka-7s. He generally hates listening to stereo systems, though a moderately volumed Randy Newman or some German classical composers are okay, and he avoids other writers like the plague. One of the book's memorable scenes includes him sharing a hotel with William Burroughs, and neither of them giving a fuck about meeting the other. Chinaski is a pathetic sack of shit, but one you can love.more
Henry Chinaski desires women almost as much as he loves liquor. He's tough on them though - but isn't much easier on himself. His recent success has them stumbling over each other to be with the drunken writer and poet. He has several in play at one time, but his honesty has to be admired. Before he goes to pick a new one up at the airport he calls his current girlfriend to give her advance notice of his cheating. More than a few of his chances with women - sexual and otherwise - are blown by drinking. But with success comes more chances to blow - and with a better class of woman than he's used to. There are also quite a few that drinking doesn't interfere with. Sometimes It's hard to tell that he even likes women. When one of the few that he doesn't try to bed talks, it's "like being battered with tiny pingpong balls."At times his poetic sensibility seeps through the cruelty: "You're a whore." "Yeah? Well', if there's anything worse than a whore it's a bore." "If there's anything worse than a bore it's a boring whore."Chinaski isn't comfortable with most people - including women, isn't comfortable with success, and certainly not with himself. He feels inferior to waiters: "I had arrived too late and with too little. The waiters all read Truman Capote. I read the race results" and department store clerks: "They acted so superior, they seemed to know the secret of life, they had a confidence I didn't possess." Chinaski is a highly flawed narrator, but most of his charm comes from the fact that he knows it and is willing to lay it all out there anyway.more
Depending on my state of mind, I like the book. In 1996, a close male friend recommended I read this because I reminded him of Linda. It totally rang bells for I was going out with an alcoholic. All stories were really dysfunctional and great!!more
A good companion piece to read at the same time is "Love is a dog from Hell" Many of the poems in that book we're fleshed "hee hee" out form the stories of reletionships he describes in "Women."more
What can I say, classic Bukowski...more
Chinaski/Bukowski drinks his way from woman to woman, showing it up along the way as a desperately dull way to live. Some of the writing is startlingly, put-the-book-down good, but as a reading experience the book dies around two-thirds of the way through, as the monotony of his life drowns everything else out. It’s a trudge after that, but then that’s probably the point. Bukowski was not an admirable guy, but if you haven’t picked him up, you’re missing out.more
If you don't enjoy frequent use of the good old-fashioned "c-word" then stay away from this one.more
A candid look into the real women who Bukowski actually dated.more
Read all 20 reviews

Reviews

I thoroughly enjoy Bukowski's work, but I got tired of Bukowksi's prose two thirds of the way into the novel. The writing becomes terse and Bukowski's blunt simplicity becomes tiresome after he describes the same "types" of scenes over and over.

I still ate up the book in a couple of days. This book is quite satirical and boarders the surreal. I love how Bukowski's characters speak about arbitrary subjects, and somehow, these arbritray subjects characterizes their speakers perfectly.

It's an interesting and wobbly travail down Bukowski Road. That man sure had some devoted fans that put up with a lot of shit to be in his presence.more
An 18+ novel that reads like a children's book. This autobiographical recollection of Bukowski's encounter with woman after woman after woman (after woman) doesn't have a specific message, but it serves as a brutally honest look at the character's degenerate lifestyle as a womanizing alcoholic. Chinaski often questions why women give him the time of day, given he's a total low-life...but whatever he's doing as a newly famous poet certainly is garnering attention from ladies far more interesting than he. The contrast between his pathetic ways and the lifestyles of some of the women that pursue him is large (belly dancers, health nuts, promoters, etc.).I can't say I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was interesting to read about the ease with which Chinaski beds women, but the plot repeats itself over and over again with a new woman each time until finally he's forced to realize that he's a scumbag and that he needs to change his ways and treat women with respect and dignity. I can't say I got much out of it, except for a few laughs and one particularly striking characteristic: amidst all the drinking, sex, and laziness that is Chinaski's life and thought process, we are hit with "pangs" of wisdom and emotional introspection about both himself and society. As though throughout the monotonous life of drinking and affairs, there's still a true human being somewhere in there. Wouldn't read again.more
Pure crap.And I love his poetry.I even enjoyed Post Office and Factotum. But this novel just shows what a miserable human being he was. He was vain. He was selfish. He objectified women. Just take this snippet:At ten AM I went down for breakfast. I found Pete and Selma. Selma looked great. How did one get a Selma? The dogs of this world never ended up with a Selma. Dogs ended up with dogs. Selma served us breakfast. She was beautiful and one man owned her, a college professor. That was not quite right, somehow. Educated hotshot smoothies. Education was the new god, and educated men the new plantation masters. Seriously? This book removed Bukowski from my favorite authors list.At least he was honest.He was right: Dogs end up with dogs.more
Women finds Bukowski (or Chinaski) after he has arrived as a novelist and poet. It's sort of like Factotum except instead of going through a bunch of jobs, he goes through a bunch of women. It doesn't quite reach the high water mark of Factotum, though, because the sex in that smaller book is sexy and the low-life of Chinaski works well with the people he interacts with. In fact, I'm going to have to read Factotum again, probably. Anyways, his trademarks are certainly there in this book, they're just not shown to his best like Ham On Rye.more
Very good. Read it on a snowboard trip to Whistler. Had me laughing out loud and reading passages to Thanos, and you should have seen his eyes pop when he realized that there are actually BOOKS about this kind of stuff. Classic Bukowski.more
This holds a special place for me as the first Bukowski novel I ever read. Much has been said about Bukowski the poet but as a novelist he is equally thought-provoking.more
Charles Bukowski writes about a time in his life when his success as a writer attracts many women. And, like a sex-starved teenager, he takes advantage of every opportunity. Bukowski's addict character Chinaski boozes and fucks his way through a sequence of short-lived relationships. Some of these end messily, some cordially. Most end some time after the next has begun. They become a little repetitive after a while: Chinaski gets some fan mail, agrees to meet the woman at the airport; they drink and have sex. Bukowski describes the women, the sex, and himself unflinchingly and unflatteringly but with some humour. I quite liked his honesty. He avoids other writers (and people in general) but when he does encounter others' writings or poems he is straight and objective in his assessment of their work. Chinaski does not reform; he is happy with his drinking and his low, seedy, misanthropic lifestyle. At the end however he gives a hint of becoming slightly less selfish.more
I finished to read "Ask The Dust", by John Fante, when was suggested me to read this book. It's really similar, but Henry Chinaski has something different from the other guy. He's more unusual, more shameless, seems to be more talented and lucky. I like the way he moves from one situation to another, and, in the middle of the book, you're tempted to live like him. In the final, you start to think if you really wanna live like this... So different and absolutely crazy women, in a world of drugs, with no rules and minimal worrings seems to be interessant... At certain point.more
The semi-autobiographical tale of Henry "Hank" Chinaski, a self-described "dirty old man," an alcoholic misogynist loner semi-famous poet with bad teeth, an ugly face, poor fashion, great legs, and an uncanny ability to attract women twenty to thirty years younger than himself. The story follows Hank through his exploits with women, so numerous that by the end of the book you've lost track of how many he's been with and anything about their personality. Hank is a "researcher" of women, trying to learn about their essence through relationships varying from a sight-unseen two-and-a-half year marriage to the several day tryst. In addition to being a ladies man, Hank is also a prodigious drinker, mostly it seems of beer and vodka-7s. He generally hates listening to stereo systems, though a moderately volumed Randy Newman or some German classical composers are okay, and he avoids other writers like the plague. One of the book's memorable scenes includes him sharing a hotel with William Burroughs, and neither of them giving a fuck about meeting the other. Chinaski is a pathetic sack of shit, but one you can love.more
Henry Chinaski desires women almost as much as he loves liquor. He's tough on them though - but isn't much easier on himself. His recent success has them stumbling over each other to be with the drunken writer and poet. He has several in play at one time, but his honesty has to be admired. Before he goes to pick a new one up at the airport he calls his current girlfriend to give her advance notice of his cheating. More than a few of his chances with women - sexual and otherwise - are blown by drinking. But with success comes more chances to blow - and with a better class of woman than he's used to. There are also quite a few that drinking doesn't interfere with. Sometimes It's hard to tell that he even likes women. When one of the few that he doesn't try to bed talks, it's "like being battered with tiny pingpong balls."At times his poetic sensibility seeps through the cruelty: "You're a whore." "Yeah? Well', if there's anything worse than a whore it's a bore." "If there's anything worse than a bore it's a boring whore."Chinaski isn't comfortable with most people - including women, isn't comfortable with success, and certainly not with himself. He feels inferior to waiters: "I had arrived too late and with too little. The waiters all read Truman Capote. I read the race results" and department store clerks: "They acted so superior, they seemed to know the secret of life, they had a confidence I didn't possess." Chinaski is a highly flawed narrator, but most of his charm comes from the fact that he knows it and is willing to lay it all out there anyway.more
Depending on my state of mind, I like the book. In 1996, a close male friend recommended I read this because I reminded him of Linda. It totally rang bells for I was going out with an alcoholic. All stories were really dysfunctional and great!!more
A good companion piece to read at the same time is "Love is a dog from Hell" Many of the poems in that book we're fleshed "hee hee" out form the stories of reletionships he describes in "Women."more
What can I say, classic Bukowski...more
Chinaski/Bukowski drinks his way from woman to woman, showing it up along the way as a desperately dull way to live. Some of the writing is startlingly, put-the-book-down good, but as a reading experience the book dies around two-thirds of the way through, as the monotony of his life drowns everything else out. It’s a trudge after that, but then that’s probably the point. Bukowski was not an admirable guy, but if you haven’t picked him up, you’re missing out.more
If you don't enjoy frequent use of the good old-fashioned "c-word" then stay away from this one.more
A candid look into the real women who Bukowski actually dated.more
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