Reader reviews for All the Colors of Darkness

Ohh, it was with great happiness and anticipation that I settled in on the couch with All the Colours of Darkness, newly released from McClelland!This is the 18th book in the Inspector Banks series from Peter Robinson. Every last one has been a great read and this one was no exception.The series takes place in England and has followed the career of Alan Banks and his co workers. Just as interesting is Banks' personal life. Over 18 novels, it has been fascinating to follow the progressions of the character's lives. It gives such a realistic note to the books and makes the characters even more believable. Banks' fondness for listening to all types of music has more than once sent me on a search for a CD, just to hear what he has described.Annie Cabot's (Banks' partner and ex-lover) latest case appears to be a suicide by hanging on a school property. However, when she finds the man's lover bludgeoned to death, Banks is called back to work from a weekend away. The case takes an even more curious turn when one of the victims is discovered to have worked for M16 - Britain's Security and Secret Intelligence Services. Even more curious is the speed at which the case is declared closed. Murder suicide - the end. Bank's supervisor, Inspector Gervaise, insists on him taking some time off and to accept that the case is closed. While agreeing, Banks decides to investigate further on the sly and enlists the help of Annie Cabot and Winsome Jackman. And they do discover more...."Oh, jealousy, betrayal, envy, ambition, greed, lust, revenge. The usual stuff of Shakespearean tragedies. All the colours of darkness."This case borrows from current headlines and as always is an intelligent mystery.There is just something comforting about settling down with a Peter Robinson. I never bother reading the cover notes anymore - I just know that I'm in for a really good read. If you haven't yet discovered this award winning series, I encourage you to. They don't need to be read in order - each book is a great tale on it's own.
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This is an interesting read... Police procedural spy. I like the way the inter=relationship between the detectives an spy's evolves.Just want to comment on the huge amount of 'name-dropping' in this book. Huge number of music and movie citations [sounds a lot like ad placement and is annoying to me:]. I like it better when authors use more generic descriptions. I have no idea what the music or movie is about so I don't get a good sense of the mood the author is trying to convey.
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was really dissapointed with this book. i could of read first few chapters and then the end as the middle had nothing of substance. as for the random bomb that goes off very strange!
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I have read and enjoyed several of the Alan Banks mysteries and this is one of the weakest. The mystery and its resolution are not particularly interesting, and the final interactions between Banks and the secret service is ridiculous.
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A group of children playing in the woods in the Yorkshire Dales discovers a man's body hanging from a tree. Mark Hardcastle, theatre set designer, appears to have committed suicide after killing his lover Laurence Silbert.DI Annie Cabbot's investigation is compliocated by the fact that her boss DCI Alan Banks is having a weekend in London with his girlfriend, and that the Chief Constable, a friend of Silbert's, wants unsavoury details hushed up. Banks is not happy when Superintendent Gervaise insists he is called back early. However when he begins to uncover details, Gervaise is far from happy about the direction the investigation is taking.The Chief Constable, in response to pressure from higher up, insists that the investigation be wrapped up quickly. Banks however becomes convinced that he is under observation, that there is more to know about Silbert, and, as Gervaise knows, telling him to stop just ensures he will ignore orders. She tells Banks to resume his holidays, and to leave the final details to Annie Cabbot. Which of course he can't do.It occurred to me, as I read on, that the plot line of the high level detective coming under threat because he won't abandon an investigation is wearing a bit thin. We've seen it used in many other novels - Frost, Harry Hole, and Kurt Wallander, just to name a few that come quickly to mind. But somehow for me that doesn't really detract from the fine plotting in this novel. Banks eventually comes up with a plausible explanation for the murder/suicide after a couple of stuttering and implausible theories. Annie Cabbot, as usual, is drawn in by the charisma of her boss, and puts her career, and her life, on the line.It always amazes me that Robinson, after all a Canadian, writes such an English novel. And what is it about Yorkshire? Robinson novels are set largely in Yorkshire and London, Reginald Hill's Dalziel & Pascoe are set in Yorkshire. And also, Wingfield's novels are set nearby in the Midlands.Yorkshire must rival Midsomer for murder capital of the world!ALL THE COLOURS OF DARKNESS seems even more littered than usual with references to Banks' musical taste, and even with references to other writers and their novels. Here are the songs mentioned.A very acceptable read.
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Two men are found dead, one brutally beaten in his apartment and the other hanging from a tree in a local park. It appears to have been a lover's spat turned into a murder/suicide but once it is found out that one of the dead men was a secret agent with MI6 things start to seem more complicated than at first presumed.I enjoyed this book but can't say that it is up to par with the other Inspector Banks novels I've read to date. I enjoyed the whodunit and the author digs deep into Banks' psyche making him one of my favourite detectives. What I found (shall I say) boring was all the secret agent/spy stuff. MI5 this, MI6 that, just doesn't do it for me. I like my mysteries to be crimes and thrillers not spy novels. While I enjoy an Ian Fleming as much as the next fellow, I didn't expect this book to be so dependent on the spy aspects for the plot.The ending was a surprise, rather bleak, certainly not a happy ending. Inspector Banks' private life is a main feature of this novel and I enjoyed that aspect very much and once again it also was left with a bleak uncertainty, leaving one curious as to where his personal life will go in the next novel. Fans of the series will find enjoyment meeting up with favourite characters again but if you are new to the series do not start with this one as it is not representational of the series as a whole.
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A slightly different sort of crime book where it's hard to identify exactly what is the crime and who should be charged. But it's a good investigative read. The ending, though, was a bit cut off, almost as if the author didn't know where to go with the story, so just ended it as quickly as possible, in the same way it could have been ended earlier in the book. But that's the problem with spy novels.
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I'v read all the books in Robinson's Banks series, and while they are all intelligent, engaging and much better than the run of the mill detective stories, the series has had its ups and downs before.This, I'd say, is a down period, and I'm not sure whether Banks has that much mileage left in him. But I've said that before and Robinson has surprised me by finding a way to bring some spark back to the series.
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i liked this when i was finished more than i liked it while reading.
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All the Colours of Darkness is the eighteenth book in Peter Robinson’s remarkable crime series featuring DI Alan Banks. Although good, I didn’t think it lived up to his usual standard and so this one will not go down as one of my favourites of the series.I found it hard to get into the rather convoluted plot involving the deaths of two men, one a suicide committed in remorse over his having murdered his lover. The lover it turns out is retired from the secret service and before too long Banks has M16 breathing down his neck and trying to control the investigation.A huge leap-of-faith is required by the reader when Banks develops his theory from watching the play Othello. Luckily after eighteen books I do trust in his deductive reasoning but it was quite the stretch.Still Robinson can write. His descriptive narration, character development and scene setting is flawless as usual. So overall although I was slightly disappointed I have great faith that Peter Robinson will blow my socks off with book number nineteen.
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