Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Welcome to a land Ray Bradbury calls "the Undiscovered Country" of his imagination--that vast territory of ideas, concepts, notions and conceits where the stories you now hold were born. America's premier living author of short fiction, Bradbury has spent many lifetimes in this remarkable place--strolling through empty, shadow-washed fields at midnight; exploring long-forgotten rooms gathering dust behind doors bolted years ago to keep strangers locked out.. and secrets locked in. The nights are longer in this country. The cold hours of darkness move like autumn mists deeper and deeper toward winter. But the moonlight reveals great magic here--and a breathtaking vista.

The October Country is many places: a picturesque Mexican village where death is a tourist attraction; a city beneath the city where drowned lovers are silently reunited; a carnival midway where a tiny man's most cherished fantasy can be fulfilled night after night. The October Country's inhabitants live, dream, work, die--and sometimes live again--discovering, often too late, the high price of citizenship. Here a glass jar can hold memories and nightmares; a woman's newborn child can plot murder; and a man's skeleton can war against him. Here there is no escaping the dark stranger who lives upstairs...or the reaper who wields the world. Each of these stories is a wonder, imagined by an acclaimed tale-teller writing from a place shadows. But there is astonishing beauty in these shadows, born from a prose that enchants and enthralls. Ray Bradbury's The October Country is a land of metaphors that can chill like a long-after-midnight wind...as they lift the reader high above a sleeping Earth on the strange wings of Uncle Einar.

Published: HarperCollins on Apr 30, 2013
ISBN: 9780062242259
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The October Country
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

At the time of its publication in 1955, The October Country was "all that Mr. Bradbury wishes to preserve from the long-out-of-print limited edition of DARK CARNIVAL, plus five new and equally brilliant selections..." (from the cover blurb of the paperback edition). It is early Bradbury, which is to say stories written from the beginnings of the flood of stories he would write over the next five decades, vintage Bradbury, which is to say short gems of poetic evocations of everyday humans living in the "October Country" that was Bradbury's mind. Mythic and archetypal and thoroughly captivating.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After reading just a few pages into this powerful book of short stories, I was completely blown away. They all seemed to grow better and better as I read.Bradbury's true talent is short fiction, as demonstrated by all of the 19 short stories here. I don't think a single one was badly written, or anything remotely close to it.The author writes his tales in a genius blend of irony, horror, science fiction, and wit. Each story touches briefly into the unnatural, the eerie, the ethereal.Also, Bradbury uses the end of each story to make each one even stronger and more haunting. All end at the climax, most times leaving the reader to wonder exactly what the final result of the story is. This unseen, mysterious ending often makes it far better than reading it.If I had to think of an alternate title for this book, it would be "Paranoia," because that is what the focus of this compilation is. Various fears - of wind, of death, of bones - amongst others, are used to turn the ordinary into the horrifying.I think that my 3 favorites of the book were "The Crowd," "The Jack-in-the-Box," and "The Scythe," though they were all amazing.One of my favorite books; highly recommended.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Every story captures a dark atmosphere where the characters are sometimes sympathetic and sometimes brutal but always oddly normal and dull (in the best way possible). Stand outs include "The Scythe", "The Emissary" and "Jack-in-the-Box".read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

At the time of its publication in 1955, The October Country was "all that Mr. Bradbury wishes to preserve from the long-out-of-print limited edition of DARK CARNIVAL, plus five new and equally brilliant selections..." (from the cover blurb of the paperback edition). It is early Bradbury, which is to say stories written from the beginnings of the flood of stories he would write over the next five decades, vintage Bradbury, which is to say short gems of poetic evocations of everyday humans living in the "October Country" that was Bradbury's mind. Mythic and archetypal and thoroughly captivating.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After reading just a few pages into this powerful book of short stories, I was completely blown away. They all seemed to grow better and better as I read.Bradbury's true talent is short fiction, as demonstrated by all of the 19 short stories here. I don't think a single one was badly written, or anything remotely close to it.The author writes his tales in a genius blend of irony, horror, science fiction, and wit. Each story touches briefly into the unnatural, the eerie, the ethereal.Also, Bradbury uses the end of each story to make each one even stronger and more haunting. All end at the climax, most times leaving the reader to wonder exactly what the final result of the story is. This unseen, mysterious ending often makes it far better than reading it.If I had to think of an alternate title for this book, it would be "Paranoia," because that is what the focus of this compilation is. Various fears - of wind, of death, of bones - amongst others, are used to turn the ordinary into the horrifying.I think that my 3 favorites of the book were "The Crowd," "The Jack-in-the-Box," and "The Scythe," though they were all amazing.One of my favorite books; highly recommended.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Every story captures a dark atmosphere where the characters are sometimes sympathetic and sometimes brutal but always oddly normal and dull (in the best way possible). Stand outs include "The Scythe", "The Emissary" and "Jack-in-the-Box".
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not a huge fan of short stories. Those which are a peek into a tantalizing side-show exasperate me when the tent flap closes. Others require too much investment for the pay-off. That said, some stories mark one forever, like a bicycle spill when you're ten years old and the concrete shaves your elbow. In October Country, the Lake is one of those stories. Bradbury sets the mood with a few deft brush strokes - a summer-spot boardwalk post Labor Day, shuttered stands and empty arcades, and then creates one of the tenderest meditations on love past and love present. With all the succinct passing beauty of a shooting star. The Lake alone is worth the purchase of this collection.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A collection of stories, most about death, all of which manage to be delightful & life affirming in the whimsical manner typical of Bradbury.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In his life's work, Bradbury is considered one of the leading writers of science fiction, but this odd collection of short stories includes a couple of horror stories, several ghost pieces, and some really WEIRD stories, mostly out of the bos fantasy. No science fiction, however. The collection gives us a writer trying to find his voice. Although the book was the second one Bradbury published, I think most, if not all, of the pieces were written well before "Fahrenheit 471" his premiere work.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd