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It isn't much of an island that rises up one moonless night from the depths of the Circle Sea -- just a few square miles of silt and some old ruins. Unfortunately, the historically disputed lump of land called Leshp is once again floating directly between Ankh-Morpork and the city of Al-Khali on the coast of Klatch -- which is spark enough to ignite that glorious internationalpastime called "war." Pressed into patriotic service, Commander Sam Vimes thinks he should be leading his loyal watchmen, female watchdwarf, and lady werewolf into battle against local malefactors rather than against uncomfortably well-armed strangers in the Klatchian desert. But war is, after all, simply the greatest of all crimes -- and it's Sir Samuel's sworn duty to seek out criminal masterminds wherever they may be hiding ... and lock them away before they can do any real damage. Even the ones on his own side.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061807695
List price: $9.99
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Takes a bit to get going, the set up is a bit boring. This is one of the ones that feels a little unfinished or too full or something. Nobby continues to be a brilliant character.more
 I sometimes wonder how well Pratchett's books translate into different languages and cultures. This one has Ankh Morpork going to war with Klatch over an island that sprung from the depths of the Circle Sea. The Klatchians are a desert people, who wear Lawrence of Arabia robes and towels on their heads, make curry, offer visitors eyeballs to see if they'll eat them, speak in a curiously curly font that is reminiscent of Arabic script and are very hot on hospitality. They are also reputed to run away at the first sight of cold steel. hmmm - sounds like they've been lumbered with just about every English stereotype of foreigners that you care to recal! Hence my musing as to how well this translates.



In the midst of escallating tension between the two communities, the Klatchian ambassador is the subject of an assassination attempt which the clues point to being a Klatchian plot - Vimes doesn't believe this is the case.



Anyway, war is declared and the leaders of society have deposed the patrician as not being sufficiently warlike enough. The gentlemen of society are raising their private regiments and Lord Rust (Ronnie) appears to be in overal charge, despite having a grasp of military tactics equivalent to a whelk. Vimes is less than happy about the situation, until he recieves a note that reminds him he is also a Knight and thus entitled to raise his own regiment. He does so, but it is a regiment of policemen who follow the trail of the assassination attempt to Klatch.



There is a saying that the first casualty of war is truth, but Vimes is not of that school of thought. He tracks down criminals, regardless of whether they commited big crimes or little crimes - a crime is a crime and he's a policeman.more
I think this is probably my favourite Discworld book, and I have read them all. I love Vimes, he is probably my favourite character, and I particularly enjoy him in this: struggling against what he wants to think, so he can do what is right. I like Carrot's ability to organise a football game between two armies as it also amuses me greatly. All in all, a lovely book, laugh out loud (NOT to be read on public transport). The only book I like more by this author is his collaboration with Neil Gaiman. There are about six core books I take everywhere I move (my job is kind of nomadic) and this is one: I know it will make me smile always.more
In this adventure, commander Vimes has to deal with quite a lot of things ranging from assassinations to arson and conspiracy. Smack in the middle of it all is a mysterious island discovered between Klatch and Ankh-Morpork. One thing leads to another and before long war is declared.more
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Reviews

Takes a bit to get going, the set up is a bit boring. This is one of the ones that feels a little unfinished or too full or something. Nobby continues to be a brilliant character.more
 I sometimes wonder how well Pratchett's books translate into different languages and cultures. This one has Ankh Morpork going to war with Klatch over an island that sprung from the depths of the Circle Sea. The Klatchians are a desert people, who wear Lawrence of Arabia robes and towels on their heads, make curry, offer visitors eyeballs to see if they'll eat them, speak in a curiously curly font that is reminiscent of Arabic script and are very hot on hospitality. They are also reputed to run away at the first sight of cold steel. hmmm - sounds like they've been lumbered with just about every English stereotype of foreigners that you care to recal! Hence my musing as to how well this translates.



In the midst of escallating tension between the two communities, the Klatchian ambassador is the subject of an assassination attempt which the clues point to being a Klatchian plot - Vimes doesn't believe this is the case.



Anyway, war is declared and the leaders of society have deposed the patrician as not being sufficiently warlike enough. The gentlemen of society are raising their private regiments and Lord Rust (Ronnie) appears to be in overal charge, despite having a grasp of military tactics equivalent to a whelk. Vimes is less than happy about the situation, until he recieves a note that reminds him he is also a Knight and thus entitled to raise his own regiment. He does so, but it is a regiment of policemen who follow the trail of the assassination attempt to Klatch.



There is a saying that the first casualty of war is truth, but Vimes is not of that school of thought. He tracks down criminals, regardless of whether they commited big crimes or little crimes - a crime is a crime and he's a policeman.more
I think this is probably my favourite Discworld book, and I have read them all. I love Vimes, he is probably my favourite character, and I particularly enjoy him in this: struggling against what he wants to think, so he can do what is right. I like Carrot's ability to organise a football game between two armies as it also amuses me greatly. All in all, a lovely book, laugh out loud (NOT to be read on public transport). The only book I like more by this author is his collaboration with Neil Gaiman. There are about six core books I take everywhere I move (my job is kind of nomadic) and this is one: I know it will make me smile always.more
In this adventure, commander Vimes has to deal with quite a lot of things ranging from assassinations to arson and conspiracy. Smack in the middle of it all is a mysterious island discovered between Klatch and Ankh-Morpork. One thing leads to another and before long war is declared.more
[3 and 1/2 stars]Entertaining as ever, but perhaps treading a little too clumsily on the really sensitive issues of race and ethnicity (the message really boils down to "war is bad, and prejudice is bad". Why yes, yes they are!). Nevertheless, it's full of Pratchett's trademark delightful character interactions and hilarious wordplay (Vimes' riffing on the saying "Veni, Vidi, Vici" is worth the price of admission alone), and it was therefore a quick and fun read.more
Veni, vidi, vici.The island of Leshp, having been on the bottom of the Circle Sea for centuries, has risen to the surface exactly between Ankh-Morpork and the city of Al-Khali on the coast of Klatch. Although the island is small and of little value, both sides lay claim to the land. It is up to Commander Sam Vimes and the rest of the Watch to deal with the biggest crime of all: war.Jingo is the 21st Discworld novel and the 4th with the City Watch theme. As always, Pratchett weaves a laugh out loud funny character comedy and successfully parodies our own culture and failings. This time around we have the war, politics, assassination, land disputes, science and weapons development, prejudice and racism. Some of the scenes with Corporal Nobs are priceless.more
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