Now includes an excerpt from the upcoming Four: A Divergent Collection.

This first book in Veronica Roth's #1 New York Times bestselling Divergent trilogy is the novel the inspired the major motion picture starring Shailene Woodley, Theo James, and Kate Winslet. This dystopian series set in a futuristic Chicago has captured the hearts of millions of teen and adult readers.

Perfect for fans of the Hunger Games and Maze Runner series, Divergent and its sequels, Insurgent and Allegiant, are the gripping story of a dystopian world transformed by courage, self-sacrifice, and love. Fans of the Divergent movie will find the book packed with just as much emotional depth and exhilarating action as the film, all told in beautiful, rich language.

One choice can transform you. Beatrice Prior's society is divided into five factions—Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). Beatrice must choose between staying with her Abnegation family and transferring factions. Her choice will shock her community and herself. But the newly christened Tris also has a secret, one she's determined to keep hidden, because in this world, what makes you different makes you dangerous.

Supports the Common Core State Standards

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062077011
List price: $5.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Divergent
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
I think this book is really good. I liked the characters, and how there were factions and all. The movie was good too, but they left out some important parts. I think the book was a lot better then the movie, but i still like the movie its just that the book is bettermore
Novel set in dystopian Chicago wherein there are five factions of people with specific personality characteristics: Abnegation (selfless), Candor (honest), Dauntless (brave), Amity (peaceful/kind), and Erudite (intelligent). These factions were formed to stop the greed that comes from too much power and to help prevent war. In theory, everyone is to live in harmony, but the different factions tend to disagree with eachother and to "war" amongst themselves, although up to now it has only been a war of words. Beatrice Priory and her brother, Caleb, are 16 and must now choose which faction they want to belong to. They come from Abnegation and have been given aptitude tests to help them decide, but if they leave their current faction, they will also be leaving their family behind, which is looked at as a betrayal. The choice is difficult for all because it is a choice for life. If they do not succeed at their initiations into their chosen factions, they become factionless (homeless) and end up with the worst jobs available and have to beg to survive.Beatrice has started having niggling thoughts like wondering what is outside the city limits (forbidden) and wondering why gates are locked from the outside--"It's almost like they are locking people IN rather than keeping danger OUT".Beatrice and Caleb make their decisions and progress on to completing their initiations and battling the challenges and doubts that accompany their choices. Beatrice reinvents herself as "Tris" and surprises everyone with admitting to an extent who she really is, although she does carry a secret about herself which could get her killed. She bonds with one of her instructors, "Four", who is hiding some secrets of his own. Together they face an opponent who may destroy their way of life as they know it.***My 12yo daughter read this and loved it and asked me to read it too. I agree with her. It is a great story and I'm looking forward to the next one in the series.more
Teen litrature at it's best.This is reminisant of mockinjay in that this is a growing up story with a female main character. It is also set in a post apoliptic world where the rules are very different. However they are quite different.for what is quite a complicated story line the story is easy to follow and has that lovely teen easy to read ability about it (that adults like me love.love it - looking for moremore
In the dystopian future of Chicago, everyone is divided into five factions when they are 16, with each faction valuing a different human characteristic, from bravery to selflessness. Tris decides to leave her family's faction and join Dauntless, the fearless and, sometimes, ruthless faction that guards the city. When the Erudite faction tries to use the Dauntless as weapons, Tris has to use her own unique skills to save them. I loved "Divergent" and it stands out among all of the other dystopian/scifi teen novels I've read. Suspenseful and thrilling, this novel is a fantastic read for any teen.more
Even better than the Hunger Games-there is more depth given to a greater number of "minor" characters, an even stronger heroine and a dash of romance that is all the sweeter for not being "mushy". Also forces readers to consider wider political and social issues, but on a greater level than in the Hunger Games: seeing humanity distilled into 5 characteristics that start out beautifully but end up tarnished and twisted is a fascinating commentary on many ideas today. Another thriller of a book that is impossible to put down no matter how much other stuff you should be doing!more
Tris must decide to stay with "her" faction (The Agbenation) or join another faction and leave all that she knows and loves behind. After she makes her choice, she encounters danger, violence, thrills and... romance. This is a classic vision of a dystopic future with lots of drama, action, and good character development.more
Background: Beatrice Prior lives in a divided society in a dystopian Chicago cityscape. Each division is responsible for and dedicated to a value, bravery, intelligence, selflessness, honesty, and peacefulness; but each has qualities that are upheld by all of the factions. Upon your 16th year, you must choose a faction to live in, many choose their parents’ factions, others decide to break away and try new things. However, you must pass the initiations for whatever faction you choose, regardless of what they ask; otherwise you become factionless and live a life of poverty and loneliness. Beatrice decides to leave her parents’ faction when she learns that she is not your typical teen and there may be a secret she has to keep from everyone. Review: I have been told to read this book by MANY people, and it has taken me way too long to get to it. I was able to grab the e-audiobook from the library and listen to it while at work (this is my new thing, I love listening to books at work, keeps me focused on tasks and makes the day go by so much faster). So on to the review: I am crazy about this book, I cannot wait to get book 2. I found that the characters and plot (even with plot holes) were amazing. I loved Tris (Beatrice changes her name) and Four and their instances together. I was also so happy that there was not a love triangle, and that the relationships in the book did not take up a majority of the plot, it was really about the faction and Tris and her choice and learning about who she is and wants to be. The plot, like I mentioned, had a few holes. There was not really an overview of the history of the factions and how they operated, you only get bits and pieces as events happen. I would have also liked more detail on the setting; I understand that the characters only know things relative to their factions and their parents’ factions, but for a better understand of where things are happening, I think it would have been helpful. Flaws aside, I loved the action throughout the plot. Tris and her faction initiation kept me on my toes and I was rooting for her the whole time. I was also very surprised by the ending and the significance of the title, Divergent, I am glad that the author pulled everything together so neatly in the end. I cannot wait for book 2, I have requested it from the library and am waiting, I think I am 4th in line :/ it is going to be a long wait, but it will be worth it from what I hear:)more
Finished it yesterday. It does indeed remind me of The Hunger Games and Harry Potter but I must admit I did enjoy it. I expect that the author will explain more about this world in the next 2 books. I am proud to say I was one of the first to have read The Hunger Games and told others to say read it too, (I am always one of the latest who have read a book so this was so exiting. lol) I can say yes it is not as good but it is still an enjoyable read.So much so that I am reading another book in that same genre.

I read this the first time in 2011 December 09 and finished it on the 13th.
Had to re-read because I have read so many books in this genre after I read this the first time, I had forgotten so much and I can now finally read book 2. Insurgent.more
What can I say? I am sad that this book has come to an end. I don't think I've said that in a long while. This book surpassed my expectations. I went into it thinking good but not above par. It will take much for another to compete. The Audio was exceptional. Emma Galvin did an AWESOME job with all the characters, IMO. Did I feel that Divergent was written with only the YA reader in mind? NO.... and for that I gave it 5 stars. I will tell all and reccomend to everyone to read or listen to this gem. I am in GREAT anticipation for Insurgent on MAY 1ST.....CAN'T WAIT!!more
While there are certainly some flaws to the story, I think this book lives up to the hype surrounding it. Seriously fast paced, original and thought provoking. I think we will see quite a few great things come out of this author's pen over the years and I will be excited to read them.more
Could be that I've just read FAR TOO MANY dystopian society young adult books and they are seriously all mixing up into one giant plotline. Dystopian society meets young hero/heroine who is somehow just slightly different than everyone else and has the vision to make the world a better place. Yeah. I think I've officially reached the burnout phase.It's not that this book was bad. It really wasn't, it's just that it presented the tipping point in too many of the same sort of young adult books that I feel I've read over the last year - Hunger Games (all three), The Giver, Uglies, etc. As for the story itself, I actually really liked the characters - the evil ones were really great at being evil (you truly HATED some) and you adored others. Tris was nothing short of awesome after switching factions. I cheered for her, and adored her more than Katniss from Hunger Games. Roth really did a nice job of saving some of the plot lines, such as the definition of Divergent and who else shared this gift until the 2nd half of the story. Loved the tatoos as being such a "bad" thing that only those in Dauntless would consider.Not sure that I'll continue with the series, only because I'm burned out, but I do think it's an engaging one.more
I was sucked into Tris' world and couldn't stop reading. The whole premise of choosing your fate at sixteen based on your believe in one of five values is interesting. However, the characters were not really well-developed and the political scene was not set up very well in the beginning. I'm torn, but I have the second one on hold, so I liked it enough.more
Loved it! I don't want to spoil anything for anyone but I'm going to have to jump on the waiting list for "Insurgent" because I absolutely could not put this book down and MUST find out what happens next!!more
Read from October 06 to 11, 2011I've waited to read this one for a couple of reasons. First, I hate the long wait for the next in the series. Second, the hype.It lived up to the hype. It's a well-paced, interesting story about an unpleasant future. Sounds familiar, of course, because everyone's writing about the future lately. Probably because the present sucks and we can only imagine an even crappier future. There have been lots of YA dystopians hitting libraries and bookshelves since the awesomeness that is The Hunger Games became uber popular. There have been some mediocre additions (Matched), some new takes on what society will do to control us (Delirium), some commentary on social issues (Bumped), but none of those really delivered on the action like The Hunger Games. Divergent does.Tris is likable, but real and it's really interesting to see how she changes throughout the book. Unlike Katniss (because you can't avoid a comparison), she's not tough from the beginning, she has to work for it. And really, I was surprised by the end...can't wait to see what happens in Insurgent.more
I love everything about this book. Everything. The world is amazing and interesting. Tris is an epic heroine. Four is swoon-worthy and an interesting character in his own right which you don't often see in books with a romance element - the boy's job is often just to be eye candy.

It's rare that I actually like a YA heroine. I often find them weak or unlikeable. Tris is anything but weak, and yet she still manages to make you like her. She makes mistakes, and you don't think she's stupid. She's very alive in the book and I wanted to know about her.

I loved her romance with Four. I loved who Four was and that he had character and motivations and I loved how their romance developed - no instalove here. And they are both awkward and "Stiff" and so true to who they would be.

The plot is intriguing and I didn't feel cheated at the end even though the book is part of an unfinished trilogy. I can't wait to see where this series goes and am looking forward to future work by this author.

Format: Kindle
Price Paid: $9.99
Recommended: Yes
Value: publisher's price
Will I Buy the Next: Yesmore
Enjoyed the book a lot more than I thought I would. It was difficult to put down once I started reading it and there was very little about it that I didn't like.more
Divergent is compulsively readable, has extremely well-formed secondary characters, and the protagonist, Tris, is wonderfully complex (a rare find in YA lit). I loved every page of it. I can't wait for the next in the series. Set in futuristic Chicago with an intriguing faction-driven society. I'm ready to re-read it now!  more
Dystopian, sure. Believable? Not so much.

I've been looking forward to this book for some time, and finally snagged a copy through my library's inspired "Lucky Day" program, wherein it makes a few copies of much-requested books available outside of the hold system, scattered around the branches. This rewards the consistent, frequent library-goer in a disproportionate fashion.

There are plot holes in this book big enough to float the Queen Mary through. There are magical realities like the part where getting shot through the shoulder causes our hero to wince slightly while doing heroic things for several hours.

The evil people are pure and unadulterated evil, not a redeeming characteristic in sight. The competent heroine learns everything with ease. The factions don't make any sense to me, there's not enough back-story provided. I understand that it's a futuristic Chicago, but WHY? What happened? Why does electricity work some places but not others? What's the point of Dauntless Faction besides getting drunk, jumping on and off moving trains (come to think of it, where are all these empty trains going, and why?), and doing other, more pointless stunts? Most of this book doesn't stand up to any sort of rational analysis.

This book is one I really wanted to like but did not, though I was able to suspend my disbelief for whole paragraphs. I think Roth shows a great deal of promise. I'd like to read her 4th book.

ETA: After brooding about this all day, I'm changing the stars. The more I think about it, the flimsier it gets.more
I'm looking forward to the forthcoming sequel.more
Man, I really wanted to like this, given the reviews and hype, but it just didn't click 0 with me. Exciting? Sure. Kick-ass girl character? Check. Dystopian ruins of Chicago, including some killer John Hancock building escapades? I can dig it. The main problem I had with it is unfortunately the central idea of the book, namely, that post-apocalyptic American (or Chicago-an? It's pretty vague on what's outside the city limits) society would self-organize into strict factions based on a single personality trait. Evil genius? To the Erudite faction! Selfless, withholding chump? Abnegation for you! Thrill-seeking adrenaline-junkie a-holes? Dauntless! Etc. This required so much willful suspension of disbelief on my part (far, far more so than, say, Hunger Games, Knife of Never Letting Go, etc.) that every time it came up in the book, I dropped right out of the story. Aside from that minor point, I really liked it.

TL;DR- Hunger Games meets the Sorting Hat from Hogwarts.more
I'm putting this in series since I'm pretty sure Roth wrote it that way. Anywho, meh. What does it say about YA trends that I can already peg this as standard YA dystopian fiction. In fact it was a little too standard, flat characters, dull world building (you don't automatically get points for setting it my favorite city) and a mediocre plot. There was many times the main character was "saved" with little or no cost. Until the end when hell can break loose and minor characters can get shot up willy-nilly. Maybe I was more annoyed with this than I thought. Ending on a positive...quick read!more
In what used to be known as Chicago, society is now dived into five factions based on one ruling personality trait: Abnegation, Erudite, Candor, Amity and Dauntless. At the age of 16 all members of society must take an aptitude test to determine which faction they are most suited for. They can then chose to stay in the faction they were raised in, or chose to leave that faction - and their family - and join another faction. Beatrice was raised in Abnegation, where self-denial is the ruling characteristic, but she has never felt selfless enough for it. The day of the aptitude test, she finds out that she is a Divergent - someone who can test into more than one faction - but that she must hide this fact from everyone. She chooses to join Dauntless, the faction that values courage above all else.

This was a great book. In a way it reminded me a lot of Holly Black's Ironside books. Not plot-wise, or even thematically per se, just in the grittiness and violence of the world depicted, and heroine who must define for herself what real courage is. It was also just as compulsively readable.

I really loved the depth of the characters and their development, and how all the pieces came together. The plotting was really excellent. And I feel like the book also had the first romance that really got me excited in a very long time. I was really rooting for the couple, and their relationship didn't seem forced at all, like it often does in recent YA.

I will definitely be picking up the next book.more
I have wanted to read Divergent for a really long time. It is commonly compared to The Hunger Games and, in this case, I think there’s a validity to the claims. There was actually a moment late in the book when I thought Beatrice was about to do something exactly like Katniss and I was pre-outraged. Luckily, Roth put Beatrice on her own path and the outrage was stopped immediately. Ultimately, I think Divergent stands on its own, only sharing common themes and ideas with THG.

Roth did quite well with the world building, providing excellent descriptions of the various factions and who populates them. I’m not sure I fully understand why society decided to split into factions, but I loved the nods to present-day Chicago as it crumbles and decays.

Beatrice, or Tris, was an engaging character. I loved her struggle to understand who she is, where she came from and what she wanted to be. I also wanted to stand and applaud Roth for taking an entire novel to develop a romance, instead of a single chapter (or page)(or paragraph). It was so very refreshing.
more
If you wanted to be petty about it, you could say that this is the 500 page version of the Sorting Hat ceremony at Hogwart’s.But in all fairness there’s more to this book. In a post-apocalyptic Chicago (rather vaguely rendered) the remains of humanity have divided themselves into factions, revering different traits the lack of which they feel was to blame for the collapse of the world before. Tris grows up in Abnegation, the faction that stresses selflessness as an ideal, and which due to their humbleness are in charge of the wobbly administration of the factions. Tris herself feels she doesn’t belong there, and when at sixteen she takes her Aptitude test to determine which faction she should belong to, her suspicion is confirmed. Instead she says goodbye to her family to join the Dauntless, the faction that worships bravery. A tough initiation awaits her – one that will leave many of the aspirants factionless and shunned. Soon she becomes aware of an inner conflict within the Dauntless, and the even darker secrets that lurk behind it. But most of all, she’s beginning to get to know who she herself really is.Right. Hmm. This is a driven, well-told story, taking on a rather complicated inner turmoil, and managing it pretty well. Tris is a rather interesting heroine with interesting dilemmas (in which I don’t necessarily include the fuzzy love story), and her journey of self-discovery is well worth following. Unfortunately, she’s backed up by mostly cutouts, including about five teenage characters who are evil purely for the sake of being evil. And the plot, while starting out promising, goes on to be more and more constructed as it deepens – as well as being pretty predictable. By the end, a few things step into real silly-land.Also, I wish Roth would have taken a bigger interest in the world building. Why are there trains constantly going back and forth in the city – surely not only because the Dauntless need something to jump on and off of at speed? Why are the people even choosing to live in a bombed out Chicago at all, when the technology they have is way more advanced than anything that exists now, and nothing seems to be lacking?I’m ranting a bit. And the flaws of this book do annoy me. But the identity theme is boldly handled, and the pages fly by. I can see myself picking up the sequel at some point. Beware however: this is as YA as it gets. If you have issues with young heroines coming to terms with their destiny, not to mention romance driven by constant misunderstandings, sulking and buckets of palm sweat, this is not for you.more
Before I review this book I must say that the cover of this book perfectly portrays the book and that Veronica Roth could not have written a more amazing book.

Before reading

I had my doubts about this book. I wasn't sure if I should read it or not. It didn't seem like my type of book. So for a couple of months I kept on putting it on my to-read list and then deleting it. Finally I picked it up and from the first page I was captivated.

During the book

I cannot express how much this book reminded me of The Hunger Games. It was SO similar yet it was unique in its own way. It was a Dystopian book with a whole different concept. During the book, I didn't know what to make of any of the characters, except Tris. I could tell straight away she was different to the others. Her mind seemed more free. It didn't seem set in one direction like everyone else.

I found it AMAZING how Veronica Roth represented the divergence in Tris.

My thoughts on the characters.

Peter and Drew reminded me eerily of Cato and Marvel. And Lynn was just plain annoying. Four and Tris didn't remind me of anyone. They were extremely unique and had a personality that I hadn't seen in any other book.

After finishing this rollercoaster of a ride

Five Factions. Those who are honest (Candor), Those with knowledge (Erudite), Those who are selfless (Abnegation), Those with Courage (Dauntless) and those who strive for peace and fairness (Amity).

When one turns 16 they must make the choice that can change everything. They must choose a faction. Whichever path they choose will change their mind set forever.

For Tris her journey to find who she was in this world and what her role was, is truly magnificent. She realised she was not fit for Erudite or Abnegation. She was told that Amity and Candor were out of the question. Which left only one faction.

When Tris made her decision she didn't know what to expect. She believed that she could fit into Dauntless and that she belonged there. She believed her choice was right .. but she didn't know what it meant to be Divergent.

Her mind didn't follow one path. It wasn't just brave. It wasn't just honest. It wasn't just striving for peace. It wasn't just selfless and it wasn't just intelligent. Her mind followed more than one path. She followed more than one direction and could see that which others could not. She was Divergent.

But Tris didn't realise that her choice could mean so much. What followed Tris was unexpected romance and the quest to find out who she was.

So my question for this book.

What does it mean to be human?

Because a human mind doesn't work in just one way.more
I'm not exactly sure how I feel about this book - too similar to the Hunger Games (and maybe even The Giver) for my taste, I think, but then also a bit of a let down in the amount of plot holes and lack of world building. However, I'm pushing through to the second book, hoping it'll get better with more material, but we shall see.more
Oh man this was boring--uninteresting first-person narration and a dystopia setting that I just wasn't into. It didn't make sense to me why people thought dividing society into these rigid factions was a good idea--maybe more details/secrets are revealed as the story progresses but I don't care enough to keep reading and find out. I have a bunch of other things I want to read, so I won't be spending any more time trying to get through this.more
Good (enough that I will read the next book in the series), but not amazing. I suspect that I would have enjoyed this more had I not read the "Hunger Games" trilogy.

It's an entertaining and engaging story about a city divided into five factions, with the children of the city living in the faction they are born into until they reach the age of 16, when they have to choose a faction for themselves to devote the rest of their lives to. Our heroine, Beatrice, is turning 16 and is from Abnegation (Selfless), and doesn't think she belongs there, so she struggles with staying or choosing a different faction at the appointed time. What follows is Beatrice's story, and what happens to her (and the factions) after she makes her choice.

Given the option, I'd probably give this 3 1/2 stars. I hope the next book doesn't let me down, like some other series' books tend to do (I'm looking at you, "Mockingjay"), but I'm not holding my breath.more
I think I have found a book that I like better than the hunger games.more
Read all 347 reviews

Reviews

I think this book is really good. I liked the characters, and how there were factions and all. The movie was good too, but they left out some important parts. I think the book was a lot better then the movie, but i still like the movie its just that the book is bettermore
Novel set in dystopian Chicago wherein there are five factions of people with specific personality characteristics: Abnegation (selfless), Candor (honest), Dauntless (brave), Amity (peaceful/kind), and Erudite (intelligent). These factions were formed to stop the greed that comes from too much power and to help prevent war. In theory, everyone is to live in harmony, but the different factions tend to disagree with eachother and to "war" amongst themselves, although up to now it has only been a war of words. Beatrice Priory and her brother, Caleb, are 16 and must now choose which faction they want to belong to. They come from Abnegation and have been given aptitude tests to help them decide, but if they leave their current faction, they will also be leaving their family behind, which is looked at as a betrayal. The choice is difficult for all because it is a choice for life. If they do not succeed at their initiations into their chosen factions, they become factionless (homeless) and end up with the worst jobs available and have to beg to survive.Beatrice has started having niggling thoughts like wondering what is outside the city limits (forbidden) and wondering why gates are locked from the outside--"It's almost like they are locking people IN rather than keeping danger OUT".Beatrice and Caleb make their decisions and progress on to completing their initiations and battling the challenges and doubts that accompany their choices. Beatrice reinvents herself as "Tris" and surprises everyone with admitting to an extent who she really is, although she does carry a secret about herself which could get her killed. She bonds with one of her instructors, "Four", who is hiding some secrets of his own. Together they face an opponent who may destroy their way of life as they know it.***My 12yo daughter read this and loved it and asked me to read it too. I agree with her. It is a great story and I'm looking forward to the next one in the series.more
Teen litrature at it's best.This is reminisant of mockinjay in that this is a growing up story with a female main character. It is also set in a post apoliptic world where the rules are very different. However they are quite different.for what is quite a complicated story line the story is easy to follow and has that lovely teen easy to read ability about it (that adults like me love.love it - looking for moremore
In the dystopian future of Chicago, everyone is divided into five factions when they are 16, with each faction valuing a different human characteristic, from bravery to selflessness. Tris decides to leave her family's faction and join Dauntless, the fearless and, sometimes, ruthless faction that guards the city. When the Erudite faction tries to use the Dauntless as weapons, Tris has to use her own unique skills to save them. I loved "Divergent" and it stands out among all of the other dystopian/scifi teen novels I've read. Suspenseful and thrilling, this novel is a fantastic read for any teen.more
Even better than the Hunger Games-there is more depth given to a greater number of "minor" characters, an even stronger heroine and a dash of romance that is all the sweeter for not being "mushy". Also forces readers to consider wider political and social issues, but on a greater level than in the Hunger Games: seeing humanity distilled into 5 characteristics that start out beautifully but end up tarnished and twisted is a fascinating commentary on many ideas today. Another thriller of a book that is impossible to put down no matter how much other stuff you should be doing!more
Tris must decide to stay with "her" faction (The Agbenation) or join another faction and leave all that she knows and loves behind. After she makes her choice, she encounters danger, violence, thrills and... romance. This is a classic vision of a dystopic future with lots of drama, action, and good character development.more
Background: Beatrice Prior lives in a divided society in a dystopian Chicago cityscape. Each division is responsible for and dedicated to a value, bravery, intelligence, selflessness, honesty, and peacefulness; but each has qualities that are upheld by all of the factions. Upon your 16th year, you must choose a faction to live in, many choose their parents’ factions, others decide to break away and try new things. However, you must pass the initiations for whatever faction you choose, regardless of what they ask; otherwise you become factionless and live a life of poverty and loneliness. Beatrice decides to leave her parents’ faction when she learns that she is not your typical teen and there may be a secret she has to keep from everyone. Review: I have been told to read this book by MANY people, and it has taken me way too long to get to it. I was able to grab the e-audiobook from the library and listen to it while at work (this is my new thing, I love listening to books at work, keeps me focused on tasks and makes the day go by so much faster). So on to the review: I am crazy about this book, I cannot wait to get book 2. I found that the characters and plot (even with plot holes) were amazing. I loved Tris (Beatrice changes her name) and Four and their instances together. I was also so happy that there was not a love triangle, and that the relationships in the book did not take up a majority of the plot, it was really about the faction and Tris and her choice and learning about who she is and wants to be. The plot, like I mentioned, had a few holes. There was not really an overview of the history of the factions and how they operated, you only get bits and pieces as events happen. I would have also liked more detail on the setting; I understand that the characters only know things relative to their factions and their parents’ factions, but for a better understand of where things are happening, I think it would have been helpful. Flaws aside, I loved the action throughout the plot. Tris and her faction initiation kept me on my toes and I was rooting for her the whole time. I was also very surprised by the ending and the significance of the title, Divergent, I am glad that the author pulled everything together so neatly in the end. I cannot wait for book 2, I have requested it from the library and am waiting, I think I am 4th in line :/ it is going to be a long wait, but it will be worth it from what I hear:)more
Finished it yesterday. It does indeed remind me of The Hunger Games and Harry Potter but I must admit I did enjoy it. I expect that the author will explain more about this world in the next 2 books. I am proud to say I was one of the first to have read The Hunger Games and told others to say read it too, (I am always one of the latest who have read a book so this was so exiting. lol) I can say yes it is not as good but it is still an enjoyable read.So much so that I am reading another book in that same genre.

I read this the first time in 2011 December 09 and finished it on the 13th.
Had to re-read because I have read so many books in this genre after I read this the first time, I had forgotten so much and I can now finally read book 2. Insurgent.more
What can I say? I am sad that this book has come to an end. I don't think I've said that in a long while. This book surpassed my expectations. I went into it thinking good but not above par. It will take much for another to compete. The Audio was exceptional. Emma Galvin did an AWESOME job with all the characters, IMO. Did I feel that Divergent was written with only the YA reader in mind? NO.... and for that I gave it 5 stars. I will tell all and reccomend to everyone to read or listen to this gem. I am in GREAT anticipation for Insurgent on MAY 1ST.....CAN'T WAIT!!more
While there are certainly some flaws to the story, I think this book lives up to the hype surrounding it. Seriously fast paced, original and thought provoking. I think we will see quite a few great things come out of this author's pen over the years and I will be excited to read them.more
Could be that I've just read FAR TOO MANY dystopian society young adult books and they are seriously all mixing up into one giant plotline. Dystopian society meets young hero/heroine who is somehow just slightly different than everyone else and has the vision to make the world a better place. Yeah. I think I've officially reached the burnout phase.It's not that this book was bad. It really wasn't, it's just that it presented the tipping point in too many of the same sort of young adult books that I feel I've read over the last year - Hunger Games (all three), The Giver, Uglies, etc. As for the story itself, I actually really liked the characters - the evil ones were really great at being evil (you truly HATED some) and you adored others. Tris was nothing short of awesome after switching factions. I cheered for her, and adored her more than Katniss from Hunger Games. Roth really did a nice job of saving some of the plot lines, such as the definition of Divergent and who else shared this gift until the 2nd half of the story. Loved the tatoos as being such a "bad" thing that only those in Dauntless would consider.Not sure that I'll continue with the series, only because I'm burned out, but I do think it's an engaging one.more
I was sucked into Tris' world and couldn't stop reading. The whole premise of choosing your fate at sixteen based on your believe in one of five values is interesting. However, the characters were not really well-developed and the political scene was not set up very well in the beginning. I'm torn, but I have the second one on hold, so I liked it enough.more
Loved it! I don't want to spoil anything for anyone but I'm going to have to jump on the waiting list for "Insurgent" because I absolutely could not put this book down and MUST find out what happens next!!more
Read from October 06 to 11, 2011I've waited to read this one for a couple of reasons. First, I hate the long wait for the next in the series. Second, the hype.It lived up to the hype. It's a well-paced, interesting story about an unpleasant future. Sounds familiar, of course, because everyone's writing about the future lately. Probably because the present sucks and we can only imagine an even crappier future. There have been lots of YA dystopians hitting libraries and bookshelves since the awesomeness that is The Hunger Games became uber popular. There have been some mediocre additions (Matched), some new takes on what society will do to control us (Delirium), some commentary on social issues (Bumped), but none of those really delivered on the action like The Hunger Games. Divergent does.Tris is likable, but real and it's really interesting to see how she changes throughout the book. Unlike Katniss (because you can't avoid a comparison), she's not tough from the beginning, she has to work for it. And really, I was surprised by the end...can't wait to see what happens in Insurgent.more
I love everything about this book. Everything. The world is amazing and interesting. Tris is an epic heroine. Four is swoon-worthy and an interesting character in his own right which you don't often see in books with a romance element - the boy's job is often just to be eye candy.

It's rare that I actually like a YA heroine. I often find them weak or unlikeable. Tris is anything but weak, and yet she still manages to make you like her. She makes mistakes, and you don't think she's stupid. She's very alive in the book and I wanted to know about her.

I loved her romance with Four. I loved who Four was and that he had character and motivations and I loved how their romance developed - no instalove here. And they are both awkward and "Stiff" and so true to who they would be.

The plot is intriguing and I didn't feel cheated at the end even though the book is part of an unfinished trilogy. I can't wait to see where this series goes and am looking forward to future work by this author.

Format: Kindle
Price Paid: $9.99
Recommended: Yes
Value: publisher's price
Will I Buy the Next: Yesmore
Enjoyed the book a lot more than I thought I would. It was difficult to put down once I started reading it and there was very little about it that I didn't like.more
Divergent is compulsively readable, has extremely well-formed secondary characters, and the protagonist, Tris, is wonderfully complex (a rare find in YA lit). I loved every page of it. I can't wait for the next in the series. Set in futuristic Chicago with an intriguing faction-driven society. I'm ready to re-read it now!  more
Dystopian, sure. Believable? Not so much.

I've been looking forward to this book for some time, and finally snagged a copy through my library's inspired "Lucky Day" program, wherein it makes a few copies of much-requested books available outside of the hold system, scattered around the branches. This rewards the consistent, frequent library-goer in a disproportionate fashion.

There are plot holes in this book big enough to float the Queen Mary through. There are magical realities like the part where getting shot through the shoulder causes our hero to wince slightly while doing heroic things for several hours.

The evil people are pure and unadulterated evil, not a redeeming characteristic in sight. The competent heroine learns everything with ease. The factions don't make any sense to me, there's not enough back-story provided. I understand that it's a futuristic Chicago, but WHY? What happened? Why does electricity work some places but not others? What's the point of Dauntless Faction besides getting drunk, jumping on and off moving trains (come to think of it, where are all these empty trains going, and why?), and doing other, more pointless stunts? Most of this book doesn't stand up to any sort of rational analysis.

This book is one I really wanted to like but did not, though I was able to suspend my disbelief for whole paragraphs. I think Roth shows a great deal of promise. I'd like to read her 4th book.

ETA: After brooding about this all day, I'm changing the stars. The more I think about it, the flimsier it gets.more
I'm looking forward to the forthcoming sequel.more
Man, I really wanted to like this, given the reviews and hype, but it just didn't click 0 with me. Exciting? Sure. Kick-ass girl character? Check. Dystopian ruins of Chicago, including some killer John Hancock building escapades? I can dig it. The main problem I had with it is unfortunately the central idea of the book, namely, that post-apocalyptic American (or Chicago-an? It's pretty vague on what's outside the city limits) society would self-organize into strict factions based on a single personality trait. Evil genius? To the Erudite faction! Selfless, withholding chump? Abnegation for you! Thrill-seeking adrenaline-junkie a-holes? Dauntless! Etc. This required so much willful suspension of disbelief on my part (far, far more so than, say, Hunger Games, Knife of Never Letting Go, etc.) that every time it came up in the book, I dropped right out of the story. Aside from that minor point, I really liked it.

TL;DR- Hunger Games meets the Sorting Hat from Hogwarts.more
I'm putting this in series since I'm pretty sure Roth wrote it that way. Anywho, meh. What does it say about YA trends that I can already peg this as standard YA dystopian fiction. In fact it was a little too standard, flat characters, dull world building (you don't automatically get points for setting it my favorite city) and a mediocre plot. There was many times the main character was "saved" with little or no cost. Until the end when hell can break loose and minor characters can get shot up willy-nilly. Maybe I was more annoyed with this than I thought. Ending on a positive...quick read!more
In what used to be known as Chicago, society is now dived into five factions based on one ruling personality trait: Abnegation, Erudite, Candor, Amity and Dauntless. At the age of 16 all members of society must take an aptitude test to determine which faction they are most suited for. They can then chose to stay in the faction they were raised in, or chose to leave that faction - and their family - and join another faction. Beatrice was raised in Abnegation, where self-denial is the ruling characteristic, but she has never felt selfless enough for it. The day of the aptitude test, she finds out that she is a Divergent - someone who can test into more than one faction - but that she must hide this fact from everyone. She chooses to join Dauntless, the faction that values courage above all else.

This was a great book. In a way it reminded me a lot of Holly Black's Ironside books. Not plot-wise, or even thematically per se, just in the grittiness and violence of the world depicted, and heroine who must define for herself what real courage is. It was also just as compulsively readable.

I really loved the depth of the characters and their development, and how all the pieces came together. The plotting was really excellent. And I feel like the book also had the first romance that really got me excited in a very long time. I was really rooting for the couple, and their relationship didn't seem forced at all, like it often does in recent YA.

I will definitely be picking up the next book.more
I have wanted to read Divergent for a really long time. It is commonly compared to The Hunger Games and, in this case, I think there’s a validity to the claims. There was actually a moment late in the book when I thought Beatrice was about to do something exactly like Katniss and I was pre-outraged. Luckily, Roth put Beatrice on her own path and the outrage was stopped immediately. Ultimately, I think Divergent stands on its own, only sharing common themes and ideas with THG.

Roth did quite well with the world building, providing excellent descriptions of the various factions and who populates them. I’m not sure I fully understand why society decided to split into factions, but I loved the nods to present-day Chicago as it crumbles and decays.

Beatrice, or Tris, was an engaging character. I loved her struggle to understand who she is, where she came from and what she wanted to be. I also wanted to stand and applaud Roth for taking an entire novel to develop a romance, instead of a single chapter (or page)(or paragraph). It was so very refreshing.
more
If you wanted to be petty about it, you could say that this is the 500 page version of the Sorting Hat ceremony at Hogwart’s.But in all fairness there’s more to this book. In a post-apocalyptic Chicago (rather vaguely rendered) the remains of humanity have divided themselves into factions, revering different traits the lack of which they feel was to blame for the collapse of the world before. Tris grows up in Abnegation, the faction that stresses selflessness as an ideal, and which due to their humbleness are in charge of the wobbly administration of the factions. Tris herself feels she doesn’t belong there, and when at sixteen she takes her Aptitude test to determine which faction she should belong to, her suspicion is confirmed. Instead she says goodbye to her family to join the Dauntless, the faction that worships bravery. A tough initiation awaits her – one that will leave many of the aspirants factionless and shunned. Soon she becomes aware of an inner conflict within the Dauntless, and the even darker secrets that lurk behind it. But most of all, she’s beginning to get to know who she herself really is.Right. Hmm. This is a driven, well-told story, taking on a rather complicated inner turmoil, and managing it pretty well. Tris is a rather interesting heroine with interesting dilemmas (in which I don’t necessarily include the fuzzy love story), and her journey of self-discovery is well worth following. Unfortunately, she’s backed up by mostly cutouts, including about five teenage characters who are evil purely for the sake of being evil. And the plot, while starting out promising, goes on to be more and more constructed as it deepens – as well as being pretty predictable. By the end, a few things step into real silly-land.Also, I wish Roth would have taken a bigger interest in the world building. Why are there trains constantly going back and forth in the city – surely not only because the Dauntless need something to jump on and off of at speed? Why are the people even choosing to live in a bombed out Chicago at all, when the technology they have is way more advanced than anything that exists now, and nothing seems to be lacking?I’m ranting a bit. And the flaws of this book do annoy me. But the identity theme is boldly handled, and the pages fly by. I can see myself picking up the sequel at some point. Beware however: this is as YA as it gets. If you have issues with young heroines coming to terms with their destiny, not to mention romance driven by constant misunderstandings, sulking and buckets of palm sweat, this is not for you.more
Before I review this book I must say that the cover of this book perfectly portrays the book and that Veronica Roth could not have written a more amazing book.

Before reading

I had my doubts about this book. I wasn't sure if I should read it or not. It didn't seem like my type of book. So for a couple of months I kept on putting it on my to-read list and then deleting it. Finally I picked it up and from the first page I was captivated.

During the book

I cannot express how much this book reminded me of The Hunger Games. It was SO similar yet it was unique in its own way. It was a Dystopian book with a whole different concept. During the book, I didn't know what to make of any of the characters, except Tris. I could tell straight away she was different to the others. Her mind seemed more free. It didn't seem set in one direction like everyone else.

I found it AMAZING how Veronica Roth represented the divergence in Tris.

My thoughts on the characters.

Peter and Drew reminded me eerily of Cato and Marvel. And Lynn was just plain annoying. Four and Tris didn't remind me of anyone. They were extremely unique and had a personality that I hadn't seen in any other book.

After finishing this rollercoaster of a ride

Five Factions. Those who are honest (Candor), Those with knowledge (Erudite), Those who are selfless (Abnegation), Those with Courage (Dauntless) and those who strive for peace and fairness (Amity).

When one turns 16 they must make the choice that can change everything. They must choose a faction. Whichever path they choose will change their mind set forever.

For Tris her journey to find who she was in this world and what her role was, is truly magnificent. She realised she was not fit for Erudite or Abnegation. She was told that Amity and Candor were out of the question. Which left only one faction.

When Tris made her decision she didn't know what to expect. She believed that she could fit into Dauntless and that she belonged there. She believed her choice was right .. but she didn't know what it meant to be Divergent.

Her mind didn't follow one path. It wasn't just brave. It wasn't just honest. It wasn't just striving for peace. It wasn't just selfless and it wasn't just intelligent. Her mind followed more than one path. She followed more than one direction and could see that which others could not. She was Divergent.

But Tris didn't realise that her choice could mean so much. What followed Tris was unexpected romance and the quest to find out who she was.

So my question for this book.

What does it mean to be human?

Because a human mind doesn't work in just one way.more
I'm not exactly sure how I feel about this book - too similar to the Hunger Games (and maybe even The Giver) for my taste, I think, but then also a bit of a let down in the amount of plot holes and lack of world building. However, I'm pushing through to the second book, hoping it'll get better with more material, but we shall see.more
Oh man this was boring--uninteresting first-person narration and a dystopia setting that I just wasn't into. It didn't make sense to me why people thought dividing society into these rigid factions was a good idea--maybe more details/secrets are revealed as the story progresses but I don't care enough to keep reading and find out. I have a bunch of other things I want to read, so I won't be spending any more time trying to get through this.more
Good (enough that I will read the next book in the series), but not amazing. I suspect that I would have enjoyed this more had I not read the "Hunger Games" trilogy.

It's an entertaining and engaging story about a city divided into five factions, with the children of the city living in the faction they are born into until they reach the age of 16, when they have to choose a faction for themselves to devote the rest of their lives to. Our heroine, Beatrice, is turning 16 and is from Abnegation (Selfless), and doesn't think she belongs there, so she struggles with staying or choosing a different faction at the appointed time. What follows is Beatrice's story, and what happens to her (and the factions) after she makes her choice.

Given the option, I'd probably give this 3 1/2 stars. I hope the next book doesn't let me down, like some other series' books tend to do (I'm looking at you, "Mockingjay"), but I'm not holding my breath.more
I think I have found a book that I like better than the hunger games.more
Load more
scribd