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For a limited time, experience the beginning of the Rain Wilds Chronicles series at a special price, including bonus excerpts from other books in the series.In Dragon Keeper, too much time has passed since the powerful dragon Tintaglia helped the people of the Trader cities stave off an invasion of their enemies. The Traders have forgotten their promises, weary of the labor and expense of tending earthbound dragons who were hatched weak and deformed by a river turned toxic. If neglected, the creatures will rampage—or die—so it is decreed that they must move farther upriver toward Kelsingra, the mythical homeland whose location is locked deep within the dragons' uncertain ancestral memories.

Thymara, an unschooled forest girl, and Alise, wife of an unloving and wealthy Trader, are among the disparate group entrusted with escorting the dragons to their new home. And on an extraordinary odyssey with no promise of return, many lessons will be learned—as dragons and tenders alike experience hardships, betrayals . . . and joys beyond their wildest imaginings.

Published: HarperCollins on May 8, 2012
ISBN: 9780062018182
List price: $1.99
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It's always a pleasure to return to Robin Hobb's Bingtown and Rainwild settings, which are once more in the throes of change. This time, she presents us with the outcasts of human and dragon society, and the text is really a passionate argument for their worth and that society should allow them to become everything they can be, while at the same time never becoming sentimental about them and allowing them to be flawed and sometimes unworthy beings. True to form, things will never be easy for them; Hobb delights in putting obstacles in her characters' paths, and one of the things that I appreciate most in her writing is that the road to maturity and self-knowledge is frequently painful and uncomfortable (for both characters and readers). It was also a pleasure to see how life is treating characters from the Liveship books: we get to spend brief but significant time with some old favourites. Cunningly, they're also used to illuminate the choices our new main characters are making - in particularly, they present Alise with a new range of possibilities, outside of her sheltered experience.The Dragon Keeper is not as epic in scope as Hobb's other works, and suffers a little from an overly-luxurious pace (although when the trade-off is extra time spent on characterisation, as it often is with Hobb, I seldom mind). As others have mentioned, the ending is somewhat abrupt, almost cliff-hangerish, and I'm keen to read the next book soon. One final caveat: here, Hobb is dealing more directly with male homosexuality (though not explicitly) than she ever has before. Unfortunately, both of the homosexual characters are quite unsympathetic. However, I do have faith in her ability to grow and change her characters (think of Malta in the Liveship books!), and even when they're being thoroughly unlikeable, she's always careful to present their motivations in such a way that the reader can understand them (e.g. Kennitt), and I don't consider this a real criticism (yet :-).read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a slow book. I remember picking it up earlier this year, or maybe it was sometime last year, and got halfway through before I set it aside and never got back to it. Luckily I remembered most of the first half so when I picked it back up this month I only had half a book to finish. Generally Hobb’s books are all slow. Hobb focuses more on character development and less on action filled scenes. I loved that aspect in her Farseer and Tawny Man series because I loved Fitz and wanted every detail I could get. Here I didn’t like the characters as much. Each one has their downfalls. Not as characters, but as people; this is overall great because that makes them very human and very realistic. But it does cause mix feelings of endearment. Hobb has always given readers the unflattering aspects of life, which I always admire. These aren’t heroes, just people trying to survive in a harsh reality. I’m looking forward to the next book even though I’m sure that one will also take a little bit to get through. While I don’t have much time to give it, going to school as I am, I love Hobb’s writing enough that I’d like to make time for it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It was ok, I guess. The story really didn't get going until the last 3rd and it ends on kind of a cliffhanger and the second book isn't due out til May. But it was diverting enough. The thing is, most of the world building was already done in previous books, so it needed some a really great story or exceptional characters to give it a wow factor. Didn't really have either, imo. Although the last chapter did make me want to read on.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

It's always a pleasure to return to Robin Hobb's Bingtown and Rainwild settings, which are once more in the throes of change. This time, she presents us with the outcasts of human and dragon society, and the text is really a passionate argument for their worth and that society should allow them to become everything they can be, while at the same time never becoming sentimental about them and allowing them to be flawed and sometimes unworthy beings. True to form, things will never be easy for them; Hobb delights in putting obstacles in her characters' paths, and one of the things that I appreciate most in her writing is that the road to maturity and self-knowledge is frequently painful and uncomfortable (for both characters and readers). It was also a pleasure to see how life is treating characters from the Liveship books: we get to spend brief but significant time with some old favourites. Cunningly, they're also used to illuminate the choices our new main characters are making - in particularly, they present Alise with a new range of possibilities, outside of her sheltered experience.The Dragon Keeper is not as epic in scope as Hobb's other works, and suffers a little from an overly-luxurious pace (although when the trade-off is extra time spent on characterisation, as it often is with Hobb, I seldom mind). As others have mentioned, the ending is somewhat abrupt, almost cliff-hangerish, and I'm keen to read the next book soon. One final caveat: here, Hobb is dealing more directly with male homosexuality (though not explicitly) than she ever has before. Unfortunately, both of the homosexual characters are quite unsympathetic. However, I do have faith in her ability to grow and change her characters (think of Malta in the Liveship books!), and even when they're being thoroughly unlikeable, she's always careful to present their motivations in such a way that the reader can understand them (e.g. Kennitt), and I don't consider this a real criticism (yet :-).
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a slow book. I remember picking it up earlier this year, or maybe it was sometime last year, and got halfway through before I set it aside and never got back to it. Luckily I remembered most of the first half so when I picked it back up this month I only had half a book to finish. Generally Hobb’s books are all slow. Hobb focuses more on character development and less on action filled scenes. I loved that aspect in her Farseer and Tawny Man series because I loved Fitz and wanted every detail I could get. Here I didn’t like the characters as much. Each one has their downfalls. Not as characters, but as people; this is overall great because that makes them very human and very realistic. But it does cause mix feelings of endearment. Hobb has always given readers the unflattering aspects of life, which I always admire. These aren’t heroes, just people trying to survive in a harsh reality. I’m looking forward to the next book even though I’m sure that one will also take a little bit to get through. While I don’t have much time to give it, going to school as I am, I love Hobb’s writing enough that I’d like to make time for it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It was ok, I guess. The story really didn't get going until the last 3rd and it ends on kind of a cliffhanger and the second book isn't due out til May. But it was diverting enough. The thing is, most of the world building was already done in previous books, so it needed some a really great story or exceptional characters to give it a wow factor. Didn't really have either, imo. Although the last chapter did make me want to read on.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Dragon Keeper by Robin Hobb is the first in a new series. As is the norm for Robin Hobb it is a great fantasy story. It is well written and makes you not want to wait for the following parts of the trilogy.
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Beautiful story, not too complex but enough to hold my attention and want me to read read read!
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I really enjoyed this story as the "world building" was both unique and believable. The setting was similar to a rain forest but with some interesting twists. The characters were both people and dragons with some interesting hints of cross-fertilization, of a sort, to come. The characters were, in the words of a friend of mine, quite tortured but also in turn lovable and irritating. Even the "evil" people had some redeeming qualities which I enjoyed as this reflects real life. I was disappointed that the novel did not happily stand alone. It really really makes you want to read the next in the series....and you know it! Not yet published. Coming out soon....in hard back. money money money
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