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After fifteen years of living like a vagabond on her reporter's schedule, Julia Reed got married and bought a house in the historic Garden District. Four weeks after she moved in, Hurricane Katrina struck. The House on First Street is the chronicle of Reed's remarkable and often hilarious homecoming, as well as a thoroughly original tribute to our country's most original city.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061849916
List price: $9.99
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Highly engaging combination of home renovation saga, food writing, and Katrina memoir. The author is a clearly wealthy contributing editor for Vogue and Newsweek whose historic home survives the storm and its aftermath. The focus is on the food industry in the wake of the storm. This proves to be a truly unique perspective. There is plenty of grit and graphic bits to represent the abundance of horrors the Crescent City endured. While the availability of fresh oysters and lump crabmeat cannot possibly compare with the carnage, there is merit in the notion that life, and the party (in New Orleans, anyway), must go on. The author also repeatedly acknowledges with great wonder at her good fortune as well as her immense guilt at having same. I truly enjoyed this book.more

Reviews

Highly engaging combination of home renovation saga, food writing, and Katrina memoir. The author is a clearly wealthy contributing editor for Vogue and Newsweek whose historic home survives the storm and its aftermath. The focus is on the food industry in the wake of the storm. This proves to be a truly unique perspective. There is plenty of grit and graphic bits to represent the abundance of horrors the Crescent City endured. While the availability of fresh oysters and lump crabmeat cannot possibly compare with the carnage, there is merit in the notion that life, and the party (in New Orleans, anyway), must go on. The author also repeatedly acknowledges with great wonder at her good fortune as well as her immense guilt at having same. I truly enjoyed this book.more
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