Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

After fifteen years of living like a vagabond on her reporter's schedule, Julia Reed got married and bought a house in the historic Garden District. Four weeks after she moved in, Hurricane Katrina struck. The House on First Street is the chronicle of Reed's remarkable and often hilarious homecoming, as well as a thoroughly original tribute to our country's most original city.

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061849916
List price: $10.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The House on First Street
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

Highly engaging combination of home renovation saga, food writing, and Katrina memoir. The author is a clearly wealthy contributing editor for Vogue and Newsweek whose historic home survives the storm and its aftermath. The focus is on the food industry in the wake of the storm. This proves to be a truly unique perspective. There is plenty of grit and graphic bits to represent the abundance of horrors the Crescent City endured. While the availability of fresh oysters and lump crabmeat cannot possibly compare with the carnage, there is merit in the notion that life, and the party (in New Orleans, anyway), must go on. The author also repeatedly acknowledges with great wonder at her good fortune as well as her immense guilt at having same. I truly enjoyed this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the story of how Julia Reed found a husband and a house and a home in New Orleans, and what happened during and after Katrina. She is a fine writer, engaging and witty, and the subject matter should be compelling. So why didn't I like this book?Perhaps it's a flaw in my character, but when someone has the regular services of a maid, and said maid's extended family when throwing cocktail parties for 100, and has a handyman (however drug-addicted) on call, when that person can buy a mansion in the Garden District that has a dining room which holds a table seating twenty-four and proceeds to renovate that mansion with extravagantly expensive materials, I find it difficult to summon up much sympathy when she complains about the costs she's incurring. Nor, when the house is left nearly unscathed by Katrina, can I empathize with her worries about her jewelry and whether her champagne will be ruined by the heat.It's very odd, because Reed seems like a generous, warm-hearted, fun-loving person, the kind of woman I'd probably like to hang out with. But there's a disconnect that I can't quite fathom between that person and the one who has to keep bending over to pick up the names she's dropping. And that irritated me to the point where I simply could not enjoy her book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Reviews

Highly engaging combination of home renovation saga, food writing, and Katrina memoir. The author is a clearly wealthy contributing editor for Vogue and Newsweek whose historic home survives the storm and its aftermath. The focus is on the food industry in the wake of the storm. This proves to be a truly unique perspective. There is plenty of grit and graphic bits to represent the abundance of horrors the Crescent City endured. While the availability of fresh oysters and lump crabmeat cannot possibly compare with the carnage, there is merit in the notion that life, and the party (in New Orleans, anyway), must go on. The author also repeatedly acknowledges with great wonder at her good fortune as well as her immense guilt at having same. I truly enjoyed this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the story of how Julia Reed found a husband and a house and a home in New Orleans, and what happened during and after Katrina. She is a fine writer, engaging and witty, and the subject matter should be compelling. So why didn't I like this book?Perhaps it's a flaw in my character, but when someone has the regular services of a maid, and said maid's extended family when throwing cocktail parties for 100, and has a handyman (however drug-addicted) on call, when that person can buy a mansion in the Garden District that has a dining room which holds a table seating twenty-four and proceeds to renovate that mansion with extravagantly expensive materials, I find it difficult to summon up much sympathy when she complains about the costs she's incurring. Nor, when the house is left nearly unscathed by Katrina, can I empathize with her worries about her jewelry and whether her champagne will be ruined by the heat.It's very odd, because Reed seems like a generous, warm-hearted, fun-loving person, the kind of woman I'd probably like to hang out with. But there's a disconnect that I can't quite fathom between that person and the one who has to keep bending over to pick up the names she's dropping. And that irritated me to the point where I simply could not enjoy her book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
scribd