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From the Publisher

An abridged version of Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, the definitive study of the aftermath of the Civil War, winner of the Bancroft Prize, Avery O. Craven Prize, Los Angeles Times Book Award, Francis Parkman Prize, and Lionel Trilling Prize.

Topics: Slavery

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062036254
List price: $9.99
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