Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

"We should expect this young woman to be more powerful than our average novice, possibly even more powerful than the average magician."

This year, like every other, the magicians of Imardin gather to purge the city of undesirables. Cloaked in the protection of their sorcery, they move with no fear of the vagrants and miscreants who despise them and their work—until one enraged girl, barely more than a child, hurls a stone at the hated invaders . . . and effortlessly penetrates their magical shield.

What the Magicians' Guild has long dreaded has finally come to pass. There is someone outside their ranks who possesses a raw power beyond imagining, an untrained mage who must be found and schooled before she destroys herself and her city with a force she cannot yet control.

Topics: Trilogy, Australian Author, Adventurous, Dark, Magic, and Female Protagonist

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061797675
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Magicians' Guild: The Black Magician Trilogy
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
A good book with well-developed characters, but fairly slow-moving.more
I should say that I don't think this style of book is for everyone. It reads like a long epic tale; the smallest of details such as the temperature of the wind should be taken into account as should relationships and rules, etc. If you are looking for a light quick read, then this isn't for you.

With that said, I loved it! The plot twists and turns were unexpected and thoroughly enjoyable. I immediately bought book 2 after I finished this one...

So now, I need to go to read it...more
My full review of this trilogy will be posted on the last book, but I liked this. It drew me into the story, though I think there was perhaps a little too long spent in the same old rut in the slums. I got to caring about the characters that I was obviously meant to care about, and I hated the ones I was supposed to hate. Not groundbreaking, but enjoyable enough.more
I've had this trilogy sitting on my shelf for at least three years, just waiting for me to feel up to the commitment of 7 inches of book. Really, this series looks absolutely huge when on a shelf. In reality, it took me about a week to work my way through the trilogy. I'm glad I did, and I wish I had done it sooner. It was quick and quite enjoyable!

This first book is a standard introduction to the rules and characters in a new magic-based world. Canavan does work in some vague social commentary, but it starts as an adventure story and continues on in the tradition of what I would call young adult fantasy. These seem aimed toward the adult fantasy market, but the themes are simple enough that I think I would have greatly enjoyed these as a tween. (Though the romance aspect may be slightly underplayed for the current tween fantasy market.) This first book really works to establish the characters and relationships and begin a vague introduction to the overarching plot of the trilogy, but not much really happens. The main character is sympathetic, though not very complex.more
Jan13:Characters: Well done in this book.Plot: A great sense of exploration.Style: High fantasy done well. Maybe not carried through, but eh.more
A fun, fast-paced young adult read and a good start to the series. Sonea, a slum girl, learns she has magic and struggles to control it while being pursued by the magician's guild. While her friends help her hide, she learns that her powers are dangerous unless she learns to control them.more
I really quite can't make up my mind about how I feel about this book. On the one hand I loved the idea of the world that Canavan has created, even though it feels very derivative, and the idea that a girl, from the wrong part of town, can have magical powers. But on the other hand, I found the book quite flat and just misses the mark. Sonea's journey through the slums as she tried to elude the Magicians should have been exciting and interesting, but, because we'd been told that she'd die unless she was properly trained, and the only place to do that was with the Magicians, it just felt overly long and, frankly, boring. The other issue is that there's something missing from the characterisations as the spark that would bring them alive is missing, as a result, I couldn't even work myself up into caring for the villain, and usually the villain of the piece is the most exciting and charismatic character in the book, and the most memorable. It just feels as though if Canavan had written another draft that would’ve put the spark into the book.more
This book is about a girl, Sonea, who grows up in the slums of Kyralia. It turns out that Sonea has untapped magical potential that will kill her is she does not find out how to control it. Knowing this, the magicians of the Guild go into the slums to find her. The Guild wants to help Sonea, but she doesn't know it. Eventually she is taken the the Guild and taught to control her powers. Sonea decides to stay with the Guild and learn about her new powers, but this comes with consequences. Being the first slum girl accepted into the Guild, Sonea is met with rejection and criticism from the older students. I really liked this book as it was well within what genre of books that I like to read. One bad point is the the story is slow paced and takes forever to get somewhere. For example, Sonea has several close calls with the Guild when she is trying to escape from them. At first these were exciting but after the fifth thrilling escape from danger, it got a bit monotonous. On the other hand, I loved the characters themselves. Sonea is brave, intelligent, and a bit stubborn, but that makes her more human. Overall, this book was a pretty good read and I would read it again and I probably will.more
A poor girl becomes frustrated during "the purge," the annual cleansing of the city by the rich. She throws a stone and hits a wizard, and realizes she too has magic. Now she must hide from the guild out of fear of what they'll do to her and her friends and family.This is a peculiar book. It's very readable and the world-building is fascinating. The character development is odd, though--some characters eventually build a great personality, but others remain stock, and it's impossible to tell what anyone looks like. For most of the book I knew the two main wizards apart only because one was older than the other, and the two kids were different only because one was a girl. Also, very little happens throughout the book. There are a few action scenes, but for the most part it's about her avoiding the guild, then wondering if she should join the guild. Our heroine is also incredibly reactive. She pretty much does nothing without someone or something prodding her or forcing her to act or make a decision.It's a quiet book, but not quite boring. I'm fascinated enough by the world, anyway, that I'm going to read the next in the series. I hope our heroine becomes more of a character and less of a device. I also hope that eventually there will be more than one female character of importance.more
This book was a nice read. The idea in it was nicely worked out, the magicians complied reasonably with the stereotype but in a nice way. The characters are well defined and they grow in the story.more
I fell straight into this book immediately, again as with the Magicians Apprentice, I found it wonderfully written with very believable well described characters. The main character is Sonea, she descovers her magical talent when she get's caught up in some trouble with some friends of hers and things get violent.The book is reasonable fast paced, and kept me interested from start to finish.more
The first in the Black Magician trilogy, a coming-of-age tale focusing on a girl called Sonea, a commoner who’s power is so strong she is able to work rudimentary magic (something that hasn’t happened for hundreds of years, as magic must be unlocked.) The first novel follows her from the gutter, to a minor riot, to a cat-and-mouse game between herself and the magicians and then finally her inevitable capture. This book came out clinging to the coat-tails of Harry Potter, though offers none of the action or humour. The style of writing is smooth – so much so I want to call it airbrushed. It is so carefully non-insulting it’s dull. Pleasant enough but there is nothing that throws sparks in the mind. Nothing that bursts with flavour. It’s also far too fussy at times. Ms Canavan for some reason can’t call an ox and ox. That goes for spiders, sheep, cows, wolves, rats and mice. It is so redundant when the animals are obviously things with familiar names. There is also the issue with humour. I know not everyone can write it, I myself have a similar issue, but Ms Canavan disguises the fact in the most jarring, irksome way. Take one scene, where Sonea is spying on a lesson within the Guild. She can hear the teacher loud and clear, but when the students make a joke she can’t hear a word. The male characters have some interesting points, but Sonea is very, very badly created. She is stupid but thinks herself clever, she is oddly reserved and polite for someone who grew up in the slums and she is uninteresting to the extreme. They all seem to be very hollow and 2D. And then the culture. The city the book is set in apparently didn’t have organised thieves until fifty years or so before. It’s been standing for over 800 years, and the thieves only seem to hang out in the slums. Why, when no one in the slums have anything worth stealing? There is so much potential and it’s just fluttered at meekly. It’s so very frustrating. For itself, the book is, well, boring. The chase doesn’t climax until over midway through and the rest is dedicated to persuading her to become a member of the Guild. It lacks plot and action. I have no idea what possessed me to purchase the entire trilogy. I seem to remember the next books being a vast improvement, which I hope is correct. Characters: 2/10Setting: 3/10Plot: 2/10Dialogue: 3/10Overall: 2.5/10more
Trudi Canavan is a remarkable author. Her characters are very believable, and her stories are energetic and interesting. This is book is a good example of that. The main character, Sonea, acts like an actual person. It's easy to see the reasoning behind her actions. The writing is very readable, although the book does switch between characters often, which can get annoying. Overall, I recommend this book to those who are a fan of fantasy.more
The Magicians' Guild by: Canavan Trudi is one of the most interesting books for me. It has a girl, an adveture of the olden day and above all else magic that could kill you in an instance. This should be your #1 choice to read book! For all fantasy lovers you must read THIS book. ITS A MUST!more
I was torn by this one. The premise behind this one intrigued me, yet it still seemed like a story I've read a hundred times. The plot seemed to plod along, yet I never had a problem picking this one up nor did I hurry to put it down. It seemed like a lot happened in this book, yet I'm not sure what or how it will move along. I think my biggest problem with this book is it seemed like a middle novel, where we are just moving the pieces around to setup for the big finale.....the only problem is, this is the first novel in the trilogy. I'm looking forward to the next book in the series, yet I'm just not sure I care....confused? So am I about this one.more
This book was a typical fantasy read for me, but I definitely enjoyed it. It's pretty fast-paced, and the plot itself is easy enough to understand. Dwells (that is, people who live in the slums) are obviously low-class. They aren't meant to have magic, and they resent the Magicians of the Guild, who purge the streets every year of innocent people. Namely, the Dwells. Sonea lives with her aunt and uncle, but on a chance meet up with some friends, discovers that she has magical powers of her own. What unfolds after that is a fast-paced story that keeps the reader on his/her toes as they follow Sonea through events and trials that she cannot control. Overall, it was intriguing, the characters were fun, and I look forward to reading the next book in the series.more
For me, this book was an average fantasy read. It was a small amount of story (girl discovers magic powers, hides from magicians, decides whether or not to join Magician's Guild) decompressed into a novel-sized book. Much of the extra text went to descriptions of the setting and the back story of this universe, sometimes explained by the characters in a very exposition-y manner. The main character, Sonea, reminded me of a less proactive Lyra from the Golden Compass. She has potential to be interesting but mostly reacted to everything around her in this first book, or sat passively by while events beyond her control played out. I liked the characters and there is at least one major plot line that will probably be the backbone of the next two books, so I will at least check out the second book in the trilogy to see if the pace of this story picks up a bit.more
A fun, fast fantasy read! The book is plot-driven with just enough suspense to keep the reader turning the pages. The underlying premise is that "magic" is an energy/power within some people, and, that that energy must be controlled or its use will destroy the person and everything around him or her. This is the story's justification for the plot line of a government hunting down a young woman, Sonea, who belatedly had become aware of her "magical" energy. In movie-style and "24" style of flashing from scene to scene without any transition, the author achieves a sense of intense and immediate concern and action by both Sonea and her pursuers. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story as it was written. Had there been more character development and more elaborate descriptions, it could easily have matched some of Dicken's works.more
This book grab me from the 1st page shook me like a rag doll and I got the idea I better dig in this is gonna be one hell of a ride. There was just nothing I didn't like about it. Can't wait to read the next and hope it is every bit ...one more chapter, just one more..then I'll go to bed...as this 1st book was..WOW what a way to kick off a career. more
This book started off on the wrong foot for me, with a contradiction in the first paragraph (is the wind howling because of what it sees or is it silent because of what it sees?). The next few chapters did little to improve my opinion. The characters were stereotyped and the description clumsy. There were info dumps about how the world worked. There were words changed simply to make the world feel different—for example, ale became bol and there were substituted words for tea, coffee and troubl...more This book started off on the wrong foot for me, with a contradiction in the first paragraph (is the wind howling because of what it sees or is it silent because of what it sees?). The next few chapters did little to improve my opinion. The characters were stereotyped and the description clumsy. There were info dumps about how the world worked. There were words changed simply to make the world feel different—for example, ale became bol and there were substituted words for tea, coffee and trouble. Some very lazy world-building right there.Having familiarised the reader with everything, it picked up a little bit. However, overall it remained a very unsatisfying read. The characters didn’t seem to develop much (with the possible exception of Cery). There was no explanation as to why Sonea wanted to go home so badly. And home to where, given that had been effectively destroyed in the beginning? Even setting that aside, the reader may have sympathised more if they’d been allowed to see more of what her life was like there. Instead we end up with cardboard cutouts of parents.All in all, I feel that there are better stories out there waiting to be published.more
I'd been aware of this fantasy series for a few years and picked this up from the local library. When I flicked through the book in the library the first paragraph captivated me and made me decide to read it: "It is said, in Imardin, that the wind has a soul, and that it wails through the narrow city streets because it is grieved by what it finds there. On the day of the Purge it whistled amongst the swaying masts in the Marina, rushed through the Western Gates and screamed between the buildings. Then, as if appalled by the ragged souls it met there, it quietened to a whimper." The story focuses on a slum girl called Sonea who accidentally discovers she has magical powers. In Imardin it is forbidden for an untrained magician to be loose in the city so the Magicians' Guild must track her down and either train her as a magician or block her powers so she cannot use them. However, the Magicians' Guild is traditionally made up of members from the ruling classes of Imardin and there are many who do not want to see a slum dweller become part of the Guild.Trudi Canavan, in her first novel, has managed to create an intriguing fantasy world complete with intrigue, rival guilds and an exciting plot hook at the end of the novel to anticipate the rest of the trilogy. I particularly liked the characters she has created; some fantasy authors seem to write characters so annoying that they set my teeth on edge but the characters in The Magicians' Guild were wonderful. One reviewer wrote that they wanted one character (Rothen) to be real so that they could meet him and I completely agree.I gave this book four stars and immediately went back to my library to grab the next in the series.more
I'm amazed at how long it took for Sonea to be captured, and it really annoys me that the author doesn't make it clear how to pronounce the character's names, but by the end I felt like I wanted Rothen to be real so I could meet him in person.I thought Sonea had an unusually strong grip on her own thoughts and feelings, and a very unusually strong sense of being able to stand up for her self, especially given she's supposedly only 15 (or 16 at the most)... I don't know many (or any) 15 year old young women who are rationally assertive without falling into self-doubts and other self-injuring behaviour. But that's the only problem I have with the story - I loved it!!more
An age old story line where girl suddenly discovers she has magic powers. The main character Sonea draws attention to herself by inadvertently using her blossoming power during a purge carried out every year by the Magician’s Guild. The people of the slums actively dislike and mistrust the Magician’s Guild and many live in fear of them, after the Purge the story then relates how Sonea is kept hidden from the Magicians who are searching for her, the problems and fear that she faces as her burdgeoning powers start to become uncontrollable and highly dangerous. This is a book that I think many fantasy fans will enjoy, not too complicated, a very enjoyable read which you will be drawn into right from the start, the story line is intriguing, the characters very well written and likeable. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and am now starting the second book in the Trilogymore
Set in a wonderfully created world, with beautifully crafted characters, the story, although a little simplistic to begin with is interesting and flows well. Canavan really draws you into the trilogy with the first if the books and you cant help but want to read more. The book runs far deeper thn just wizards and magic, Sonea (lead character) develops beautifully throughout the book and you discover so much about her as she discovers herself. A must read.more
Set in the fictitious town of Imardin, the capital city of Kyralia, "The Magician's Guild" by Trudi Canavan starts with a bang. It begins focussing in our main character Sonea, where she and her family are being driven away from their place in the slums. Each year the city streets are purged of the the poor or lower class citizens (also referred to as dwells) by the magician's guild. Though most have no choice but to leave and find new homes, many refuse to go without a fight, hoping that they can force the magician's to let them be -- or at the very least make their point become clear-- that the dwells and slums are a part of Imardin, no matter how much they hate it.During these purges, often times young gang members and Dwells gather around to throw rocks at the magicians in a form of protest. Though it usually does little good -- the magicians are protected by a magical shield, things soon change as our main character, young Sonea steps up to the plate. Forcing her anger and rage into the stone which she clutches so desperately; young Sonea broods with hate as she angrily hurls the rock towards a group of Magician's that gather nearby. That's when a real shock occurs; one that takes everyone by surprise, including Sonea herself. With the force of her throw and the will of her mind, the rock plunges straight ahead, breaking through the magical barrier; the invisible shield that was set in place -- the shield that no one could penetrate through without the use of magic -- a magic Sonea never knew she had. And in that moment, the rock hits Lord Fergun with great force, knocking him unconscious.And this is where the story really begins. "The Magicians' Guild" is a creative story that takes a few twists and turns. Not only is this novel about the wonder of Magic, it is also about self discovery, self control, love, friendship, and betrayal. The main character Sonea is easily likable, and even relatable to. Though the majority of the story is indeed compelling, I felt a few areas were a bit slow. I also felt that some of the other characters could have been expanded upon more -- given a bit more depth. Despite these small issues, I found this unique story to be an easy and pleasant read. One that kept me curious and engaged, even after I finished the last page. I've already picked up the second in the trilogy, and plan to start it right away. All in all, if you like fantasy that is a bit *light*, with little violence and no sex, you'll enjoy this magical tale. "The Magicians' Guild" is a friendly read for people of all ages. It's a creative and original piece, written by a writer who clearly has a feel for the fantasy genre. I recommend this book to all who enjoy a good fantasy tale.more
After a few years break from the genre, I decided to try a new fantasy author and it left me wondering why I stopped reading these books. Trudi Canavan has written an excellent start to a trilogy, with an interesting world developing. It's not earth shattering stuff, certainly at the moment, it's easy to read and has a fairly simple storyline but it's very readable and enjoyable. It's made me eager to read the next in the series, something that I've not felt in a while. Recommended.more
Slightly slow to get into-very long, but definitely got me interested. Very clever just how many characters she got in there, sometimes a tiny tiny tiny bit obvious.more
This series follows the adventures of Sonea, a young woman who grows up in the slums of her city but later finds that she is a magician, a status that puts her above most nobility. This trilogy covers a lot of growth of the main characters as their lives are turned upside down by the revelation that peasants can be born magicians. It's really a good set of tales, and I probably would have rated it higher if the grand finale in the last book hadn't been so anti-climactic.more
A very pleasant easy read. The story has a very simple core to it, and with well formed characters and a well-described easily envisaged environment it passes very nicely. But there is a catch, just to keep one reading.more
Read all 42 reviews

Reviews

A good book with well-developed characters, but fairly slow-moving.more
I should say that I don't think this style of book is for everyone. It reads like a long epic tale; the smallest of details such as the temperature of the wind should be taken into account as should relationships and rules, etc. If you are looking for a light quick read, then this isn't for you.

With that said, I loved it! The plot twists and turns were unexpected and thoroughly enjoyable. I immediately bought book 2 after I finished this one...

So now, I need to go to read it...more
My full review of this trilogy will be posted on the last book, but I liked this. It drew me into the story, though I think there was perhaps a little too long spent in the same old rut in the slums. I got to caring about the characters that I was obviously meant to care about, and I hated the ones I was supposed to hate. Not groundbreaking, but enjoyable enough.more
I've had this trilogy sitting on my shelf for at least three years, just waiting for me to feel up to the commitment of 7 inches of book. Really, this series looks absolutely huge when on a shelf. In reality, it took me about a week to work my way through the trilogy. I'm glad I did, and I wish I had done it sooner. It was quick and quite enjoyable!

This first book is a standard introduction to the rules and characters in a new magic-based world. Canavan does work in some vague social commentary, but it starts as an adventure story and continues on in the tradition of what I would call young adult fantasy. These seem aimed toward the adult fantasy market, but the themes are simple enough that I think I would have greatly enjoyed these as a tween. (Though the romance aspect may be slightly underplayed for the current tween fantasy market.) This first book really works to establish the characters and relationships and begin a vague introduction to the overarching plot of the trilogy, but not much really happens. The main character is sympathetic, though not very complex.more
Jan13:Characters: Well done in this book.Plot: A great sense of exploration.Style: High fantasy done well. Maybe not carried through, but eh.more
A fun, fast-paced young adult read and a good start to the series. Sonea, a slum girl, learns she has magic and struggles to control it while being pursued by the magician's guild. While her friends help her hide, she learns that her powers are dangerous unless she learns to control them.more
I really quite can't make up my mind about how I feel about this book. On the one hand I loved the idea of the world that Canavan has created, even though it feels very derivative, and the idea that a girl, from the wrong part of town, can have magical powers. But on the other hand, I found the book quite flat and just misses the mark. Sonea's journey through the slums as she tried to elude the Magicians should have been exciting and interesting, but, because we'd been told that she'd die unless she was properly trained, and the only place to do that was with the Magicians, it just felt overly long and, frankly, boring. The other issue is that there's something missing from the characterisations as the spark that would bring them alive is missing, as a result, I couldn't even work myself up into caring for the villain, and usually the villain of the piece is the most exciting and charismatic character in the book, and the most memorable. It just feels as though if Canavan had written another draft that would’ve put the spark into the book.more
This book is about a girl, Sonea, who grows up in the slums of Kyralia. It turns out that Sonea has untapped magical potential that will kill her is she does not find out how to control it. Knowing this, the magicians of the Guild go into the slums to find her. The Guild wants to help Sonea, but she doesn't know it. Eventually she is taken the the Guild and taught to control her powers. Sonea decides to stay with the Guild and learn about her new powers, but this comes with consequences. Being the first slum girl accepted into the Guild, Sonea is met with rejection and criticism from the older students. I really liked this book as it was well within what genre of books that I like to read. One bad point is the the story is slow paced and takes forever to get somewhere. For example, Sonea has several close calls with the Guild when she is trying to escape from them. At first these were exciting but after the fifth thrilling escape from danger, it got a bit monotonous. On the other hand, I loved the characters themselves. Sonea is brave, intelligent, and a bit stubborn, but that makes her more human. Overall, this book was a pretty good read and I would read it again and I probably will.more
A poor girl becomes frustrated during "the purge," the annual cleansing of the city by the rich. She throws a stone and hits a wizard, and realizes she too has magic. Now she must hide from the guild out of fear of what they'll do to her and her friends and family.This is a peculiar book. It's very readable and the world-building is fascinating. The character development is odd, though--some characters eventually build a great personality, but others remain stock, and it's impossible to tell what anyone looks like. For most of the book I knew the two main wizards apart only because one was older than the other, and the two kids were different only because one was a girl. Also, very little happens throughout the book. There are a few action scenes, but for the most part it's about her avoiding the guild, then wondering if she should join the guild. Our heroine is also incredibly reactive. She pretty much does nothing without someone or something prodding her or forcing her to act or make a decision.It's a quiet book, but not quite boring. I'm fascinated enough by the world, anyway, that I'm going to read the next in the series. I hope our heroine becomes more of a character and less of a device. I also hope that eventually there will be more than one female character of importance.more
This book was a nice read. The idea in it was nicely worked out, the magicians complied reasonably with the stereotype but in a nice way. The characters are well defined and they grow in the story.more
I fell straight into this book immediately, again as with the Magicians Apprentice, I found it wonderfully written with very believable well described characters. The main character is Sonea, she descovers her magical talent when she get's caught up in some trouble with some friends of hers and things get violent.The book is reasonable fast paced, and kept me interested from start to finish.more
The first in the Black Magician trilogy, a coming-of-age tale focusing on a girl called Sonea, a commoner who’s power is so strong she is able to work rudimentary magic (something that hasn’t happened for hundreds of years, as magic must be unlocked.) The first novel follows her from the gutter, to a minor riot, to a cat-and-mouse game between herself and the magicians and then finally her inevitable capture. This book came out clinging to the coat-tails of Harry Potter, though offers none of the action or humour. The style of writing is smooth – so much so I want to call it airbrushed. It is so carefully non-insulting it’s dull. Pleasant enough but there is nothing that throws sparks in the mind. Nothing that bursts with flavour. It’s also far too fussy at times. Ms Canavan for some reason can’t call an ox and ox. That goes for spiders, sheep, cows, wolves, rats and mice. It is so redundant when the animals are obviously things with familiar names. There is also the issue with humour. I know not everyone can write it, I myself have a similar issue, but Ms Canavan disguises the fact in the most jarring, irksome way. Take one scene, where Sonea is spying on a lesson within the Guild. She can hear the teacher loud and clear, but when the students make a joke she can’t hear a word. The male characters have some interesting points, but Sonea is very, very badly created. She is stupid but thinks herself clever, she is oddly reserved and polite for someone who grew up in the slums and she is uninteresting to the extreme. They all seem to be very hollow and 2D. And then the culture. The city the book is set in apparently didn’t have organised thieves until fifty years or so before. It’s been standing for over 800 years, and the thieves only seem to hang out in the slums. Why, when no one in the slums have anything worth stealing? There is so much potential and it’s just fluttered at meekly. It’s so very frustrating. For itself, the book is, well, boring. The chase doesn’t climax until over midway through and the rest is dedicated to persuading her to become a member of the Guild. It lacks plot and action. I have no idea what possessed me to purchase the entire trilogy. I seem to remember the next books being a vast improvement, which I hope is correct. Characters: 2/10Setting: 3/10Plot: 2/10Dialogue: 3/10Overall: 2.5/10more
Trudi Canavan is a remarkable author. Her characters are very believable, and her stories are energetic and interesting. This is book is a good example of that. The main character, Sonea, acts like an actual person. It's easy to see the reasoning behind her actions. The writing is very readable, although the book does switch between characters often, which can get annoying. Overall, I recommend this book to those who are a fan of fantasy.more
The Magicians' Guild by: Canavan Trudi is one of the most interesting books for me. It has a girl, an adveture of the olden day and above all else magic that could kill you in an instance. This should be your #1 choice to read book! For all fantasy lovers you must read THIS book. ITS A MUST!more
I was torn by this one. The premise behind this one intrigued me, yet it still seemed like a story I've read a hundred times. The plot seemed to plod along, yet I never had a problem picking this one up nor did I hurry to put it down. It seemed like a lot happened in this book, yet I'm not sure what or how it will move along. I think my biggest problem with this book is it seemed like a middle novel, where we are just moving the pieces around to setup for the big finale.....the only problem is, this is the first novel in the trilogy. I'm looking forward to the next book in the series, yet I'm just not sure I care....confused? So am I about this one.more
This book was a typical fantasy read for me, but I definitely enjoyed it. It's pretty fast-paced, and the plot itself is easy enough to understand. Dwells (that is, people who live in the slums) are obviously low-class. They aren't meant to have magic, and they resent the Magicians of the Guild, who purge the streets every year of innocent people. Namely, the Dwells. Sonea lives with her aunt and uncle, but on a chance meet up with some friends, discovers that she has magical powers of her own. What unfolds after that is a fast-paced story that keeps the reader on his/her toes as they follow Sonea through events and trials that she cannot control. Overall, it was intriguing, the characters were fun, and I look forward to reading the next book in the series.more
For me, this book was an average fantasy read. It was a small amount of story (girl discovers magic powers, hides from magicians, decides whether or not to join Magician's Guild) decompressed into a novel-sized book. Much of the extra text went to descriptions of the setting and the back story of this universe, sometimes explained by the characters in a very exposition-y manner. The main character, Sonea, reminded me of a less proactive Lyra from the Golden Compass. She has potential to be interesting but mostly reacted to everything around her in this first book, or sat passively by while events beyond her control played out. I liked the characters and there is at least one major plot line that will probably be the backbone of the next two books, so I will at least check out the second book in the trilogy to see if the pace of this story picks up a bit.more
A fun, fast fantasy read! The book is plot-driven with just enough suspense to keep the reader turning the pages. The underlying premise is that "magic" is an energy/power within some people, and, that that energy must be controlled or its use will destroy the person and everything around him or her. This is the story's justification for the plot line of a government hunting down a young woman, Sonea, who belatedly had become aware of her "magical" energy. In movie-style and "24" style of flashing from scene to scene without any transition, the author achieves a sense of intense and immediate concern and action by both Sonea and her pursuers. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story as it was written. Had there been more character development and more elaborate descriptions, it could easily have matched some of Dicken's works.more
This book grab me from the 1st page shook me like a rag doll and I got the idea I better dig in this is gonna be one hell of a ride. There was just nothing I didn't like about it. Can't wait to read the next and hope it is every bit ...one more chapter, just one more..then I'll go to bed...as this 1st book was..WOW what a way to kick off a career. more
This book started off on the wrong foot for me, with a contradiction in the first paragraph (is the wind howling because of what it sees or is it silent because of what it sees?). The next few chapters did little to improve my opinion. The characters were stereotyped and the description clumsy. There were info dumps about how the world worked. There were words changed simply to make the world feel different—for example, ale became bol and there were substituted words for tea, coffee and troubl...more This book started off on the wrong foot for me, with a contradiction in the first paragraph (is the wind howling because of what it sees or is it silent because of what it sees?). The next few chapters did little to improve my opinion. The characters were stereotyped and the description clumsy. There were info dumps about how the world worked. There were words changed simply to make the world feel different—for example, ale became bol and there were substituted words for tea, coffee and trouble. Some very lazy world-building right there.Having familiarised the reader with everything, it picked up a little bit. However, overall it remained a very unsatisfying read. The characters didn’t seem to develop much (with the possible exception of Cery). There was no explanation as to why Sonea wanted to go home so badly. And home to where, given that had been effectively destroyed in the beginning? Even setting that aside, the reader may have sympathised more if they’d been allowed to see more of what her life was like there. Instead we end up with cardboard cutouts of parents.All in all, I feel that there are better stories out there waiting to be published.more
I'd been aware of this fantasy series for a few years and picked this up from the local library. When I flicked through the book in the library the first paragraph captivated me and made me decide to read it: "It is said, in Imardin, that the wind has a soul, and that it wails through the narrow city streets because it is grieved by what it finds there. On the day of the Purge it whistled amongst the swaying masts in the Marina, rushed through the Western Gates and screamed between the buildings. Then, as if appalled by the ragged souls it met there, it quietened to a whimper." The story focuses on a slum girl called Sonea who accidentally discovers she has magical powers. In Imardin it is forbidden for an untrained magician to be loose in the city so the Magicians' Guild must track her down and either train her as a magician or block her powers so she cannot use them. However, the Magicians' Guild is traditionally made up of members from the ruling classes of Imardin and there are many who do not want to see a slum dweller become part of the Guild.Trudi Canavan, in her first novel, has managed to create an intriguing fantasy world complete with intrigue, rival guilds and an exciting plot hook at the end of the novel to anticipate the rest of the trilogy. I particularly liked the characters she has created; some fantasy authors seem to write characters so annoying that they set my teeth on edge but the characters in The Magicians' Guild were wonderful. One reviewer wrote that they wanted one character (Rothen) to be real so that they could meet him and I completely agree.I gave this book four stars and immediately went back to my library to grab the next in the series.more
I'm amazed at how long it took for Sonea to be captured, and it really annoys me that the author doesn't make it clear how to pronounce the character's names, but by the end I felt like I wanted Rothen to be real so I could meet him in person.I thought Sonea had an unusually strong grip on her own thoughts and feelings, and a very unusually strong sense of being able to stand up for her self, especially given she's supposedly only 15 (or 16 at the most)... I don't know many (or any) 15 year old young women who are rationally assertive without falling into self-doubts and other self-injuring behaviour. But that's the only problem I have with the story - I loved it!!more
An age old story line where girl suddenly discovers she has magic powers. The main character Sonea draws attention to herself by inadvertently using her blossoming power during a purge carried out every year by the Magician’s Guild. The people of the slums actively dislike and mistrust the Magician’s Guild and many live in fear of them, after the Purge the story then relates how Sonea is kept hidden from the Magicians who are searching for her, the problems and fear that she faces as her burdgeoning powers start to become uncontrollable and highly dangerous. This is a book that I think many fantasy fans will enjoy, not too complicated, a very enjoyable read which you will be drawn into right from the start, the story line is intriguing, the characters very well written and likeable. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and am now starting the second book in the Trilogymore
Set in a wonderfully created world, with beautifully crafted characters, the story, although a little simplistic to begin with is interesting and flows well. Canavan really draws you into the trilogy with the first if the books and you cant help but want to read more. The book runs far deeper thn just wizards and magic, Sonea (lead character) develops beautifully throughout the book and you discover so much about her as she discovers herself. A must read.more
Set in the fictitious town of Imardin, the capital city of Kyralia, "The Magician's Guild" by Trudi Canavan starts with a bang. It begins focussing in our main character Sonea, where she and her family are being driven away from their place in the slums. Each year the city streets are purged of the the poor or lower class citizens (also referred to as dwells) by the magician's guild. Though most have no choice but to leave and find new homes, many refuse to go without a fight, hoping that they can force the magician's to let them be -- or at the very least make their point become clear-- that the dwells and slums are a part of Imardin, no matter how much they hate it.During these purges, often times young gang members and Dwells gather around to throw rocks at the magicians in a form of protest. Though it usually does little good -- the magicians are protected by a magical shield, things soon change as our main character, young Sonea steps up to the plate. Forcing her anger and rage into the stone which she clutches so desperately; young Sonea broods with hate as she angrily hurls the rock towards a group of Magician's that gather nearby. That's when a real shock occurs; one that takes everyone by surprise, including Sonea herself. With the force of her throw and the will of her mind, the rock plunges straight ahead, breaking through the magical barrier; the invisible shield that was set in place -- the shield that no one could penetrate through without the use of magic -- a magic Sonea never knew she had. And in that moment, the rock hits Lord Fergun with great force, knocking him unconscious.And this is where the story really begins. "The Magicians' Guild" is a creative story that takes a few twists and turns. Not only is this novel about the wonder of Magic, it is also about self discovery, self control, love, friendship, and betrayal. The main character Sonea is easily likable, and even relatable to. Though the majority of the story is indeed compelling, I felt a few areas were a bit slow. I also felt that some of the other characters could have been expanded upon more -- given a bit more depth. Despite these small issues, I found this unique story to be an easy and pleasant read. One that kept me curious and engaged, even after I finished the last page. I've already picked up the second in the trilogy, and plan to start it right away. All in all, if you like fantasy that is a bit *light*, with little violence and no sex, you'll enjoy this magical tale. "The Magicians' Guild" is a friendly read for people of all ages. It's a creative and original piece, written by a writer who clearly has a feel for the fantasy genre. I recommend this book to all who enjoy a good fantasy tale.more
After a few years break from the genre, I decided to try a new fantasy author and it left me wondering why I stopped reading these books. Trudi Canavan has written an excellent start to a trilogy, with an interesting world developing. It's not earth shattering stuff, certainly at the moment, it's easy to read and has a fairly simple storyline but it's very readable and enjoyable. It's made me eager to read the next in the series, something that I've not felt in a while. Recommended.more
Slightly slow to get into-very long, but definitely got me interested. Very clever just how many characters she got in there, sometimes a tiny tiny tiny bit obvious.more
This series follows the adventures of Sonea, a young woman who grows up in the slums of her city but later finds that she is a magician, a status that puts her above most nobility. This trilogy covers a lot of growth of the main characters as their lives are turned upside down by the revelation that peasants can be born magicians. It's really a good set of tales, and I probably would have rated it higher if the grand finale in the last book hadn't been so anti-climactic.more
A very pleasant easy read. The story has a very simple core to it, and with well formed characters and a well-described easily envisaged environment it passes very nicely. But there is a catch, just to keep one reading.more
Load more
scribd