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In this follow-up to her bestselling Sex with Kings, Eleanor Herman reveals the truth about what goes on behind the closed door of a queen's boudoir. Impeccably researched, filled with page-turning romance, passion, and scandal, Sex with the Queen explores the scintillating sexual lives of some of our most beloved and infamous female rulers.

She was the queen, living in an opulent palace, wearing lavish gowns and dazzling jewels. She was envied, admired, and revered. She was also miserable, having been forced to marry a foreign prince sight unseen, a royal ogre who was sadistic, foaming at the mouth, physically repulsive, mentally incompetent, or sexually impotent—and in some cases all of the above.

How did queens find happiness? In courts bristling with testosterone—swashbuckling generals, polished courtiers, and virile cardinals—many royal women had love affairs.

Anne Boleyn flirted with courtiers; Catherine Howard slept with one. Henry VIII had both of them beheaded.

Catherine the Great had her idiot husband murdered, and ruled the Russian empire with a long list of sexy young favorites.

Marie Antoinette fell in love with the handsome Swedish count Axel Fersen, who tried valiantly to rescue her from the guillotine.

Empress Alexandra of Russia found emotional solace in the mad monk Rasputin. Her behavior was the spark that set off the firestorm of the Russian revolution.

Princess Diana gave up her palace bodyguard to enjoy countless love affairs, which tragically led to her early death.

When a queen became sick to death of her husband and took a lover, anything could happen—from disgrace and death to political victory. Some kings imprisoned erring wives for life; other monarchs obligingly named the queen's lover prime minister.

The crucial factor deciding the fate of an unfaithful queen was the love affair's implications in terms of power, money, and factional rivalry. At European courts, it was the politics—not the sex—that caused a royal woman's tragedy—or her ultimate triumph.

Topics: England, France, Russia, The Renaissance, Tudor Period, Erotic, Royalty, Sex, Queen, Politics, and Women in History

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061751561
List price: $11.79
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crazy entertaining and endlessly interesting! read more
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Silly, salacious and about as meaningful as People Magazine, this book is compulsively readable. It's well-written, engaging and pruriently interesting. It appeals to all of the same trash receptors in one's brain that fuel the National Enquirer, Star and the other weekly mags featuring vapid celebrities. The big difference is that the vapid celebrities in the book are royal and dead. A fun read nonetheless.
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crazy entertaining and endlessly interesting!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
hhhh
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Silly, salacious and about as meaningful as People Magazine, this book is compulsively readable. It's well-written, engaging and pruriently interesting. It appeals to all of the same trash receptors in one's brain that fuel the National Enquirer, Star and the other weekly mags featuring vapid celebrities. The big difference is that the vapid celebrities in the book are royal and dead. A fun read nonetheless.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A fascinating look at a woman's role throughout history as royalty. Women were treated as political pawns and often married to horrible men that cheated on them as well. Queens took pleasure where they could and it often cost them everything. Absolutely fascinating.
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Eleanor Herman's latest proves that being a Queen is more than just swanning about in amazing gowns with a tiara on your head before adoring crowds. Being a queen or royal consort usually meant marrying for power (sometimes to a close family member-hello Haspburg dynasty!), horrid in-laws (for example, the Electress Sophia, mother of the future King George I of Great Britain), fighting with your husband's mistress (such as Madame Pompadour) , being a political scapegoat (Czarina Alexandra; Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall; Wallis, the Duchess of Windsor) and having to ensure the royal bloodline above all else to gain even a little respect from the Court (Catherine the Great of Russia; Marie Antoinette). Read this along with Ms. Herman's "Sex with Kings" and Karl Shaw "Royal Babylon" for even more eye opening royal truths.
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This is a fascinating book that I read in pieces.
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