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The town psychiatrist has decided to switch everybody in Pine Cove, California, from their normal antidepressants to placebos, so naturally—well, to be accurate, artificially—business is booming at the local blues bar. Trouble is, those lonely slide-guitar notes have also attracted a colossal sea beast named Steve with, shall we say, a thing for explosive oil tanker trucks. Suddenly, morose Pine Cove turns libidinous and is hit by a mysterious crime wave, and a beleaguered constable has to fight off his own gonzo appetites to find out what's wrong and what, if anything, to do about it.

Topics: United States of America, California, Funny, Sex, Monsters, Depression, Mental Illness, Drugs, Demons, and 20th Century

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 6, 2009
ISBN: 9780061983788
List price: $9.99
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I thought the story line was clever and well tied together. The characters were well-developed, funny and imaginative. The sexual themes to me, diminished a pretty good storyline. Despite the reviews, I did not find the book humorous.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I thought the story line was clever and well tied together. The characters were well-developed, funny and imaginative. The sexual themes to me, diminished a pretty good storyline. Despite the reviews, I did not find the book humorous.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
i can't explain it. you won't believe me. just read it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Not my favorite of his books, but good fun to read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
'Lust Lizard' sees a return to the sleepy town of Pine Cove, some ten years after the absurd happenings of 'Practical Demonkeeping'. There is no reason to read Demonkeeping first since Lust Lizard is a self-contained story and only uses Pine Cove as a backdrop, the continuity between books is almost non-existent. The central theme is that of a lizard as old as the dinosaurs, (which makes people horny) who turns up amidst a town of habitually depressed people (who are missing there anti-depressants). Expect anything different from Moore, who is consistently producing curveball material? There are several other plotlines, all intersecting throughout the novel, it's cleverly plotted stuff. The only negative point is that Lizard is not a directly funny as Moore's other works. It's imaginative, daring, incredulous and will keep you interested until the finale. A recommended read, but be aware that there are better Moore books out there.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Oh, how does one begin to summarize the plot of a Christopher Moore book. This time let us not even try but instead let's take a glimpse into the characters in this novel. First and foremost, we have Steve, sea monster, who has recently woken from a long sleep and has come ashore in Pine Cove. Steve has an unusual way of catching prey, he sends off pheromones that make any nearby mammals "horny" and they seek him out. This plays particular havoc on Pine Cove's population as the local shrink, Valerie, has just decided to take all her patients off antidepressants (about 1/3 of the population) and try talking to her patients instead of just medicating them. Then there is local constable Theophilus Crowe, a pothead, who had been given the job to keep Pine Cone off the local sherrif's hands, as he is too busy working his meth empire to bother with policing sleepy Pine Cove. By no means the last and certainly not the least, there is Molly Michon, aging warrior actress in Italian movies who dresses daily in her Warrior Queen outfit and works out with her broadsword, but known to the locals as "the crazy lady".A hilarious romp, this somewhat of a sequel to the first Pine Cove book, Practical Demonkeeping, and is by far a better read. Hilarious, far-fetched, un-politically correct and a down right page-turner. I really enjoyed this. Moore is not for everyone but if you like your humour a little over the top and don't mind some well-placed vulgarity you'll enjoy this ride with the citizens of Pine Cove.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Christopher Moore is, as always, a genius when it comes to the absurd and warped sense of humor that I enjoy oh-so-much. Who else could give us a plot that includes all of the following: a former B movie starlet who still lives the life of her most famous role as Kendra: Warrior Babe of the Wasteland, a sea beast with a vendetta against a wayward bluesman, a psychologist who decides to put the entire town on placebo anti-depressants instead of the real deal, a pharmacist with a fish fetish (yes, that's right), meth labs and drug dealers, interspecies love, and occasional chapters told from the point of view of a labrador retriever named Skinner? This is not for everyone--serious people need not apply. The plot is wacky and unbelievable; in other words, vintage Moore. While I really enjoyed the book and laughed often, the only reason I gave it 3 stars is that, when compared with his other books, I didn't like it quite as much as Bloodsucking Fiends and Fluke (Or I Know Why the Winged Whale Sings). However, the novel is well worth the time of anyone who already enjoys Moore or is discovering him for the first time.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
When thinking about this book, the words "wild" and "romp" immediately push themselves to the front of the mind. A mystery disguised in sex-filled gonzo-type hallucinogenic humor, "The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove" is a quick, easy, and very rewarding read. Moore is a genius in his particular craft, and will happily leave the reader wanting to subject themselves to more of his imagination.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Funny, sexy, and extremely odd. Great for readers who are looking for some brain candy and like, Terry Pratchet, Carl Hiasan and Tom Robinsread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Christopher Moore has a funny way about him. He creates some fantastic characters who end up in unworldly situations. I would recommend any Christopher Moore book to anyone willing to listen. If someone enjoys the likes of Tom Holt or Douglas Adams they will love Moore's writing.The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove is not by any means one of Moore's best books, but it is still worth the read. Contained within these pages is a lizard who can take on the form of a mobile home, a bartender who is more like the bionic woman than human, a blues singer who gets the blues knocked off of him and a Stepford wife who kills herself or did she?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This wild roller coaster ride of a book is like a spoof of my favorite type of horror story – the kind where the menacing monster comes to terrorize the isolated small town. In this case, the small town is on the California coast, and the monster is a gigantic, prehistoric sea monster/dragon, with a long memory and an unquenchable lust for just about everything, from gasoline trucks to a former B-movie actress.When the “lust lizard” comes to town, he makes the whole town go horny, bringing together some very unlikely couples. As in all good small-town horror stories, we get to know a variety of kooky characters (and one kooky dog), who all must work together in the end to defeat – or do I mean save? – the monster. Only this time, the horror story isn’t horrible, but uproariously funny.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
What do you get when you cross a town full of depressed people with a prehistoric sea creature named Steve? The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove of course. Taking place ten years after Christopher Moore's original Pine Cove novel, the sleepy little town has survived the tourist season and is getting ready to wind down and get on with life. But when the town psychiatrist decides to take everyone of their anti-depressants and put them on placebos instead, this cozy little town goes crazy. To make matters worse, an unexplained wave of horniness has overtaken the residents of pine cove. And you know what they say about horny depressed people. Right?I read this book while at work and I imagine I looked like a crazy person from laughing out loud so much. This book will make you laugh out loud too. Moore is able to expertly mix humor and plot, wit and story. He can make you laugh and keep you reading. Although it's probably best not to do it while on the job. Learned that one the way.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A Sea Monster visits a semi-sleepy California coastal town. Molly, the crazy person, Theo, the kind-of-a-cop and other colorful residents confront the BIG fella while temporarily taken off of anti-depressants by the Val, the psychiatrist.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After one of her patients appears to have committed suicide, psychiatrist Valerie Riordan decides to take all of her patients off of anti-depressantssimultaneously. This, combined with the appearance of a 5,000 year old sea monster named Steve, and a secret methamphetamine lab brings wacky mayhem tothe town of Pine Grove. Add to the mix a schizophrenic former pulp movie actress, a pothead sheriff, a blues musician on the run from his past, and a burgeoning cult that decides to worship the sea monster, and you have a fine mix of zany humor and deft social commentary. This is a fine example of Moore's off-the-wall humor where nothing is sacred and everything is fair game. If you are looking for something off the beaten path and funny, this is a fine introduction to Christopher Moore's unique brand of storytelling.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Pine Cove is like many small coastal towns. Too busy for words during the hot summer months and barebones during the winter. What sets Pine Cove apart is local wildlife, the townspeople. With a pothead constable, terminatorisque barkeep, money hungry psychiatrist, a pharmacist with fetishes you can't discuss in public and more of the population on anti-depressants than a rehab for the rich and famous, it's no wonder things get a little strange once in a while. But, when a sex starved, voracious sea beast follows a paranoid Bluesman into town things are bound to get even weirder than ever in Pine Cove.When I started reading this book I wasn't really sure if I would like it. In fact, it was a little slow going at first. However, once I began to get more into the eccentricities of the townspeople and the sea beast it became more interesting. And once Steve got that odd notion into his head about the fuel tanker, well, that was it for me. Luckily people don't usually die of aphyxiation from laughing too much! I really did like this book. Although the story may have dragged just a little in some places it was filled with enough hilarious one liners and punchlines to make up the difference. I loved all the different characters and took a particular shine to Theo, the pothead constable with a heart of gold.If you aren't afraid of a little raunchy humor and love to laugh I would definitely recommend this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It took me two tries to get into the story, but once I did, the book was awesome.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Not as funny as some of the other Christopher Moore novels that I've read, but he remains one of my favorite authors when I'm looking for something light.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is fun, hilarious, and even at times (unbelievably) touching. If you're looking for an escape, this is the perfect book to take your mind off worries, especially if you don't mind allowing yourself to slip into the absurd. I'd say this is one of Moore's best works, and it's certainly among my favorites. Enjoyread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another hit by Chris Moore! Though this book isn't really a follow-up to Practical Demonkeeping, it does have a few of the same characters, and makes reference to the events that happened in that book. Though if you plan to read Practical Demonkeeping and haven't yet, this book is different enough, and doesn't really give away the plot of the other, that it shouldn't matter if you read them out of order.That said, I found this book funny and engrossing and hard to put down. Like his other books, the characters are wacky and the situations they find themselves in laughable. He has a knack for making the extraordinary seem ordinary, bringing it into the "normal" lives of everyday people.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another humorous story by Mr. Moore. In the traditional Moore style, there are bizarre characters and sexual tension that lend themselves to a pleasurable read. As with every Moore book I've read to date, this keeps you smiling (or at least smirking) through to the last page.read more
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I greatly enjoy the writing of CM. I would rate this book average for him, but still a very fun read if you enjoy quirky humor.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Classic Christopher Moore. This book is Moore at his best. It is filled with quirky characters in bizarrely unbelievable plots, but it is done in a way that makes you happily plow through it to see how the madness will unfold.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In the small coastal town of Pine Cove, CA, the local psychiatrist decides to take everyone off their regular medications, quietly replacing them placebos. Soon enough, the whole town starts acting funny, and things get even strange when a seabeast named Steve roars up on the shore. He has a certain way about him that brings out the libidos of anyone around -- human and animal alike -- and starts to enjoy his new hunting grounds. It's up to local sherriff (and stoner) Theo Crowe to figure out how to rid the town of their newest resident before more people start to disappear.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lust Lizard is the first book by Christopher Moore that I've read and I don't intend it to be the last. It's well written and very funny, as the title leads you to expect. It keeps the main story and the various sub-plots moving along and it maintained my interest right to the end. By means of the backgrounds and interactions of the characters, it touches deftly on social issues, politics and religion. Except when it would be incompatible with the plot, Moore attempts to get the relevant scientific background right, and in this he succeeds better than some well-known science fiction authors.The main characters are eccentric (or downright crazy) residents of Pine Cove, a small town on the coast of California, and a couple of visitors to the town, one of whom is the Lust Lizard itself. It is a strange beast, as big as a large dinosaur, equipped both with lungs for breathing air and gills for living in the sea. It is five thousand years old and is at present male and horny, though it was female fifty years ago. It can signal its emotions by producing patterns of colour in its skin. It can use colour changes for camouflage too, though its abilities also run to amazing changes in shape. Very importantly, it has some telepathic ability, which it uses to attract susceptible prey, though there is also some leakage of its emotional state to susceptible minds: that is how it comes to be a Lust Lizard rather than just a very dangerous predator. At the beginning of the story, it has spent fifty years near a black smoker in the deep ocean, but then in the tradition of Godzilla it is attracted back to shore by a trace of radioactivity, though in this case not from weapons testing but from a slight temporary leak in a power plant.The story is told in the third person but in little sections from the points of view of several main characters: the Sea Beast or Lust Lizard; Molly, known as the crazy woman, who was previously the star of films about Kendra, Warrior Babe of the Outland and still lives much of the time in a fantasy of Kendra, and who befriends the Beast; Theo, the pothead cop; Val, the psychiatrist, who switches from careless over-prescribing of tranquillisers and antidepressants to nothing but placebos; Gabe, the biology researcher; Skinner, Gabe's dog; Estelle, the would-be artist; Catfish, the Blues singer, whom the Sea Beast hates because of an encounter with him fifty years before; Mavis, the cyborg-like barkeeper; Jenny the eavesdropping waitress; Burton, the psychopathic Sheriff who runs an organisation which manufactures and sells illegal recreational drugs; Winston, the dishonest pharmacist who fantasises about sex with marine animals but has to content himself with an inflatable dolphin.When the Beast gets near Pine Cove it has two things on its mind, food and sex. It can tell that there is prey onshore that it will be able to call, so it sends its signal, which attracts enough animals to satisfy it for now, leaving it with other problem, sex. This doesn't turn out well: its attempt to copulate with a delivery tanker at a filling station causes an explosion which destroys the station and leaves the Beast with burns and serious damage to its gills, so it's stuck on shore for a while. It hides in a trailer park and disguises itself as a double-width trailer. Molly sees it and thinks she's hallucinating, until she pokes it with Warrior Babe Kendra's sword and it opens its eyes. Later she will acquire a large quantity of burn ointment for it and bandage it with fibreglass fabric fixed with roof-patching tar. She will have some control over the Beast so that although it still eats people, it doesn't eat anybody you would like.Meanwhile the Beast's broadcast lust is having its effect and a lot of people get less sleep than usual. However some of the excess lust sloshing around leads to romantic attachments that by the end of the book look as though they will persist without the Beast's influence.(Changed 2009.08.12 after useful comments at Reviews reviewed.) (Changed 2009.08.13: last two paragraphs added.)read more
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This was my favorite of the three Pine Cove books. Here we get what Moore does best — a colorful cast of characters mired in an extremely unusual situation. In this case, there’s a mysterious sea beast in town, making the newly un-drugged residents of Pine Cove somewhat… amorous. Constable Theo Crowe knows *something* is going on, but he’s not too sure what. All he knows is that he doesn’t believe housewife Bess Leander killed herself, and it’s up to him to find out who really killed her. The only one who really has an idea of what is going on is mostly-out-of-her-mind ex-B-movie-queen Molly Michon, and who’s going to believe her? This is the Moore I first enjoyed with A Dirty Job.read more
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Very funny with an excellent narrator (Audiobook).read more
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Not his best book, but funny none the lessread more
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I totally judged a book by its title with this one when I found it in the clearance pile at my local bookstore years ago. This was my first Christopher Moore book and I was hooked from the beginning; I laughed so hard in so many places and have done so many, many times over the years of reading and re-reading this book!read more
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Christopher Moore never disappoints me. The story was fun, with hilarious characters, and a happy ending (for most of the characters).read more
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I love Christopher Moore, and this is probably my favorite book of his. I love the Pine Cove books. The funny, wacky take on life in a strange little town on the California coast.This book has a recently awakened sea monster, a whole community secretly taken off their meds by the town psychologist, a washed up B movie action star, who has trouble determining if she is the actress, or the actual character much of the time, a drugged out police officer, and a dog who relentlessly pursues his master who he thinks of as 'the food guy'.The setting is good, the characters are interesting and quirky, but still real, and the story is funny as hell.read more
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I thought the story line was clever and well tied together. The characters were well-developed, funny and imaginative. The sexual themes to me, diminished a pretty good storyline. Despite the reviews, I did not find the book humorous.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I thought the story line was clever and well tied together. The characters were well-developed, funny and imaginative. The sexual themes to me, diminished a pretty good storyline. Despite the reviews, I did not find the book humorous.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
i can't explain it. you won't believe me. just read it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Not my favorite of his books, but good fun to read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
'Lust Lizard' sees a return to the sleepy town of Pine Cove, some ten years after the absurd happenings of 'Practical Demonkeeping'. There is no reason to read Demonkeeping first since Lust Lizard is a self-contained story and only uses Pine Cove as a backdrop, the continuity between books is almost non-existent. The central theme is that of a lizard as old as the dinosaurs, (which makes people horny) who turns up amidst a town of habitually depressed people (who are missing there anti-depressants). Expect anything different from Moore, who is consistently producing curveball material? There are several other plotlines, all intersecting throughout the novel, it's cleverly plotted stuff. The only negative point is that Lizard is not a directly funny as Moore's other works. It's imaginative, daring, incredulous and will keep you interested until the finale. A recommended read, but be aware that there are better Moore books out there.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Oh, how does one begin to summarize the plot of a Christopher Moore book. This time let us not even try but instead let's take a glimpse into the characters in this novel. First and foremost, we have Steve, sea monster, who has recently woken from a long sleep and has come ashore in Pine Cove. Steve has an unusual way of catching prey, he sends off pheromones that make any nearby mammals "horny" and they seek him out. This plays particular havoc on Pine Cove's population as the local shrink, Valerie, has just decided to take all her patients off antidepressants (about 1/3 of the population) and try talking to her patients instead of just medicating them. Then there is local constable Theophilus Crowe, a pothead, who had been given the job to keep Pine Cone off the local sherrif's hands, as he is too busy working his meth empire to bother with policing sleepy Pine Cove. By no means the last and certainly not the least, there is Molly Michon, aging warrior actress in Italian movies who dresses daily in her Warrior Queen outfit and works out with her broadsword, but known to the locals as "the crazy lady".A hilarious romp, this somewhat of a sequel to the first Pine Cove book, Practical Demonkeeping, and is by far a better read. Hilarious, far-fetched, un-politically correct and a down right page-turner. I really enjoyed this. Moore is not for everyone but if you like your humour a little over the top and don't mind some well-placed vulgarity you'll enjoy this ride with the citizens of Pine Cove.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Christopher Moore is, as always, a genius when it comes to the absurd and warped sense of humor that I enjoy oh-so-much. Who else could give us a plot that includes all of the following: a former B movie starlet who still lives the life of her most famous role as Kendra: Warrior Babe of the Wasteland, a sea beast with a vendetta against a wayward bluesman, a psychologist who decides to put the entire town on placebo anti-depressants instead of the real deal, a pharmacist with a fish fetish (yes, that's right), meth labs and drug dealers, interspecies love, and occasional chapters told from the point of view of a labrador retriever named Skinner? This is not for everyone--serious people need not apply. The plot is wacky and unbelievable; in other words, vintage Moore. While I really enjoyed the book and laughed often, the only reason I gave it 3 stars is that, when compared with his other books, I didn't like it quite as much as Bloodsucking Fiends and Fluke (Or I Know Why the Winged Whale Sings). However, the novel is well worth the time of anyone who already enjoys Moore or is discovering him for the first time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
When thinking about this book, the words "wild" and "romp" immediately push themselves to the front of the mind. A mystery disguised in sex-filled gonzo-type hallucinogenic humor, "The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove" is a quick, easy, and very rewarding read. Moore is a genius in his particular craft, and will happily leave the reader wanting to subject themselves to more of his imagination.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Funny, sexy, and extremely odd. Great for readers who are looking for some brain candy and like, Terry Pratchet, Carl Hiasan and Tom Robins
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Christopher Moore has a funny way about him. He creates some fantastic characters who end up in unworldly situations. I would recommend any Christopher Moore book to anyone willing to listen. If someone enjoys the likes of Tom Holt or Douglas Adams they will love Moore's writing.The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove is not by any means one of Moore's best books, but it is still worth the read. Contained within these pages is a lizard who can take on the form of a mobile home, a bartender who is more like the bionic woman than human, a blues singer who gets the blues knocked off of him and a Stepford wife who kills herself or did she?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This wild roller coaster ride of a book is like a spoof of my favorite type of horror story – the kind where the menacing monster comes to terrorize the isolated small town. In this case, the small town is on the California coast, and the monster is a gigantic, prehistoric sea monster/dragon, with a long memory and an unquenchable lust for just about everything, from gasoline trucks to a former B-movie actress.When the “lust lizard” comes to town, he makes the whole town go horny, bringing together some very unlikely couples. As in all good small-town horror stories, we get to know a variety of kooky characters (and one kooky dog), who all must work together in the end to defeat – or do I mean save? – the monster. Only this time, the horror story isn’t horrible, but uproariously funny.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
What do you get when you cross a town full of depressed people with a prehistoric sea creature named Steve? The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove of course. Taking place ten years after Christopher Moore's original Pine Cove novel, the sleepy little town has survived the tourist season and is getting ready to wind down and get on with life. But when the town psychiatrist decides to take everyone of their anti-depressants and put them on placebos instead, this cozy little town goes crazy. To make matters worse, an unexplained wave of horniness has overtaken the residents of pine cove. And you know what they say about horny depressed people. Right?I read this book while at work and I imagine I looked like a crazy person from laughing out loud so much. This book will make you laugh out loud too. Moore is able to expertly mix humor and plot, wit and story. He can make you laugh and keep you reading. Although it's probably best not to do it while on the job. Learned that one the way.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A Sea Monster visits a semi-sleepy California coastal town. Molly, the crazy person, Theo, the kind-of-a-cop and other colorful residents confront the BIG fella while temporarily taken off of anti-depressants by the Val, the psychiatrist.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
After one of her patients appears to have committed suicide, psychiatrist Valerie Riordan decides to take all of her patients off of anti-depressantssimultaneously. This, combined with the appearance of a 5,000 year old sea monster named Steve, and a secret methamphetamine lab brings wacky mayhem tothe town of Pine Grove. Add to the mix a schizophrenic former pulp movie actress, a pothead sheriff, a blues musician on the run from his past, and a burgeoning cult that decides to worship the sea monster, and you have a fine mix of zany humor and deft social commentary. This is a fine example of Moore's off-the-wall humor where nothing is sacred and everything is fair game. If you are looking for something off the beaten path and funny, this is a fine introduction to Christopher Moore's unique brand of storytelling.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Pine Cove is like many small coastal towns. Too busy for words during the hot summer months and barebones during the winter. What sets Pine Cove apart is local wildlife, the townspeople. With a pothead constable, terminatorisque barkeep, money hungry psychiatrist, a pharmacist with fetishes you can't discuss in public and more of the population on anti-depressants than a rehab for the rich and famous, it's no wonder things get a little strange once in a while. But, when a sex starved, voracious sea beast follows a paranoid Bluesman into town things are bound to get even weirder than ever in Pine Cove.When I started reading this book I wasn't really sure if I would like it. In fact, it was a little slow going at first. However, once I began to get more into the eccentricities of the townspeople and the sea beast it became more interesting. And once Steve got that odd notion into his head about the fuel tanker, well, that was it for me. Luckily people don't usually die of aphyxiation from laughing too much! I really did like this book. Although the story may have dragged just a little in some places it was filled with enough hilarious one liners and punchlines to make up the difference. I loved all the different characters and took a particular shine to Theo, the pothead constable with a heart of gold.If you aren't afraid of a little raunchy humor and love to laugh I would definitely recommend this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It took me two tries to get into the story, but once I did, the book was awesome.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Not as funny as some of the other Christopher Moore novels that I've read, but he remains one of my favorite authors when I'm looking for something light.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is fun, hilarious, and even at times (unbelievably) touching. If you're looking for an escape, this is the perfect book to take your mind off worries, especially if you don't mind allowing yourself to slip into the absurd. I'd say this is one of Moore's best works, and it's certainly among my favorites. Enjoy
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another hit by Chris Moore! Though this book isn't really a follow-up to Practical Demonkeeping, it does have a few of the same characters, and makes reference to the events that happened in that book. Though if you plan to read Practical Demonkeeping and haven't yet, this book is different enough, and doesn't really give away the plot of the other, that it shouldn't matter if you read them out of order.That said, I found this book funny and engrossing and hard to put down. Like his other books, the characters are wacky and the situations they find themselves in laughable. He has a knack for making the extraordinary seem ordinary, bringing it into the "normal" lives of everyday people.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Another humorous story by Mr. Moore. In the traditional Moore style, there are bizarre characters and sexual tension that lend themselves to a pleasurable read. As with every Moore book I've read to date, this keeps you smiling (or at least smirking) through to the last page.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I greatly enjoy the writing of CM. I would rate this book average for him, but still a very fun read if you enjoy quirky humor.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Classic Christopher Moore. This book is Moore at his best. It is filled with quirky characters in bizarrely unbelievable plots, but it is done in a way that makes you happily plow through it to see how the madness will unfold.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In the small coastal town of Pine Cove, CA, the local psychiatrist decides to take everyone off their regular medications, quietly replacing them placebos. Soon enough, the whole town starts acting funny, and things get even strange when a seabeast named Steve roars up on the shore. He has a certain way about him that brings out the libidos of anyone around -- human and animal alike -- and starts to enjoy his new hunting grounds. It's up to local sherriff (and stoner) Theo Crowe to figure out how to rid the town of their newest resident before more people start to disappear.
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Lust Lizard is the first book by Christopher Moore that I've read and I don't intend it to be the last. It's well written and very funny, as the title leads you to expect. It keeps the main story and the various sub-plots moving along and it maintained my interest right to the end. By means of the backgrounds and interactions of the characters, it touches deftly on social issues, politics and religion. Except when it would be incompatible with the plot, Moore attempts to get the relevant scientific background right, and in this he succeeds better than some well-known science fiction authors.The main characters are eccentric (or downright crazy) residents of Pine Cove, a small town on the coast of California, and a couple of visitors to the town, one of whom is the Lust Lizard itself. It is a strange beast, as big as a large dinosaur, equipped both with lungs for breathing air and gills for living in the sea. It is five thousand years old and is at present male and horny, though it was female fifty years ago. It can signal its emotions by producing patterns of colour in its skin. It can use colour changes for camouflage too, though its abilities also run to amazing changes in shape. Very importantly, it has some telepathic ability, which it uses to attract susceptible prey, though there is also some leakage of its emotional state to susceptible minds: that is how it comes to be a Lust Lizard rather than just a very dangerous predator. At the beginning of the story, it has spent fifty years near a black smoker in the deep ocean, but then in the tradition of Godzilla it is attracted back to shore by a trace of radioactivity, though in this case not from weapons testing but from a slight temporary leak in a power plant.The story is told in the third person but in little sections from the points of view of several main characters: the Sea Beast or Lust Lizard; Molly, known as the crazy woman, who was previously the star of films about Kendra, Warrior Babe of the Outland and still lives much of the time in a fantasy of Kendra, and who befriends the Beast; Theo, the pothead cop; Val, the psychiatrist, who switches from careless over-prescribing of tranquillisers and antidepressants to nothing but placebos; Gabe, the biology researcher; Skinner, Gabe's dog; Estelle, the would-be artist; Catfish, the Blues singer, whom the Sea Beast hates because of an encounter with him fifty years before; Mavis, the cyborg-like barkeeper; Jenny the eavesdropping waitress; Burton, the psychopathic Sheriff who runs an organisation which manufactures and sells illegal recreational drugs; Winston, the dishonest pharmacist who fantasises about sex with marine animals but has to content himself with an inflatable dolphin.When the Beast gets near Pine Cove it has two things on its mind, food and sex. It can tell that there is prey onshore that it will be able to call, so it sends its signal, which attracts enough animals to satisfy it for now, leaving it with other problem, sex. This doesn't turn out well: its attempt to copulate with a delivery tanker at a filling station causes an explosion which destroys the station and leaves the Beast with burns and serious damage to its gills, so it's stuck on shore for a while. It hides in a trailer park and disguises itself as a double-width trailer. Molly sees it and thinks she's hallucinating, until she pokes it with Warrior Babe Kendra's sword and it opens its eyes. Later she will acquire a large quantity of burn ointment for it and bandage it with fibreglass fabric fixed with roof-patching tar. She will have some control over the Beast so that although it still eats people, it doesn't eat anybody you would like.Meanwhile the Beast's broadcast lust is having its effect and a lot of people get less sleep than usual. However some of the excess lust sloshing around leads to romantic attachments that by the end of the book look as though they will persist without the Beast's influence.(Changed 2009.08.12 after useful comments at Reviews reviewed.) (Changed 2009.08.13: last two paragraphs added.)
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This was my favorite of the three Pine Cove books. Here we get what Moore does best — a colorful cast of characters mired in an extremely unusual situation. In this case, there’s a mysterious sea beast in town, making the newly un-drugged residents of Pine Cove somewhat… amorous. Constable Theo Crowe knows *something* is going on, but he’s not too sure what. All he knows is that he doesn’t believe housewife Bess Leander killed herself, and it’s up to him to find out who really killed her. The only one who really has an idea of what is going on is mostly-out-of-her-mind ex-B-movie-queen Molly Michon, and who’s going to believe her? This is the Moore I first enjoyed with A Dirty Job.
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Very funny with an excellent narrator (Audiobook).
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Not his best book, but funny none the less
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I totally judged a book by its title with this one when I found it in the clearance pile at my local bookstore years ago. This was my first Christopher Moore book and I was hooked from the beginning; I laughed so hard in so many places and have done so many, many times over the years of reading and re-reading this book!
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Christopher Moore never disappoints me. The story was fun, with hilarious characters, and a happy ending (for most of the characters).
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I love Christopher Moore, and this is probably my favorite book of his. I love the Pine Cove books. The funny, wacky take on life in a strange little town on the California coast.This book has a recently awakened sea monster, a whole community secretly taken off their meds by the town psychologist, a washed up B movie action star, who has trouble determining if she is the actress, or the actual character much of the time, a drugged out police officer, and a dog who relentlessly pursues his master who he thinks of as 'the food guy'.The setting is good, the characters are interesting and quirky, but still real, and the story is funny as hell.
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