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The town psychiatrist has decided to switch everybody in Pine Cove, California, from their normal antidepressants to placebos, so naturally—well, to be accurate, artificially—business is booming at the local blues bar. Trouble is, those lonely slide-guitar notes have also attracted a colossal sea beast named Steve with, shall we say, a thing for explosive oil tanker trucks. Suddenly, morose Pine Cove turns libidinous and is hit by a mysterious crime wave, and a beleaguered constable has to fight off his own gonzo appetites to find out what's wrong and what, if anything, to do about it.

Topics: United States of America, California, Funny, Sex, Monsters, Depression, Mental Illness, Drugs, Demons, and 20th Century

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061983788
List price: $10.99
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Not his best book, but funny none the lessmore
My least favorite Moore book so far. This one was just boring.more
Christopher Moore never disappoints me. The story was fun, with hilarious characters, and a happy ending (for most of the characters).more
Multiple POVs, each chapter with the name of the POV character as title, although the dog's thoughts also showed up. Pothead constable, sea monsters, aging barbarian film princess, corrupt sheriff, murder, drugs, sex, blues, booze, and explosions in a small California tourist town. Oh, and sex, too. Yes. Yes! Hi-larious. I love this bit of description, particularly the second sentence: “Catfish Jefferson put down his National steel guitar and picked up the two-gallon pickle jar that held his tips. Dollar bills spilled over the top, change skated in the bottom, and here and there in the middle fives and tens struggled for air. There was even a twenty down there, and Catfish dug in after it like a kid going for a Cracker Jack prize."more
I totally judged a book by its title with this one when I found it in the clearance pile at my local bookstore years ago. This was my first Christopher Moore book and I was hooked from the beginning; I laughed so hard in so many places and have done so many, many times over the years of reading and re-reading this book!more
I thought the story line was clever and well tied together. The characters were well-developed, funny and imaginative. The sexual themes to me, diminished a pretty good storyline. Despite the reviews, I did not find the book humorous.more
This wild roller coaster ride of a book is like a spoof of my favorite type of horror story – the kind where the menacing monster comes to terrorize the isolated small town. In this case, the small town is on the California coast, and the monster is a gigantic, prehistoric sea monster/dragon, with a long memory and an unquenchable lust for just about everything, from gasoline trucks to a former B-movie actress.When the “lust lizard” comes to town, he makes the whole town go horny, bringing together some very unlikely couples. As in all good small-town horror stories, we get to know a variety of kooky characters (and one kooky dog), who all must work together in the end to defeat – or do I mean save? – the monster. Only this time, the horror story isn’t horrible, but uproariously funny.more
What do you get when you cross a town full of depressed people with a prehistoric sea creature named Steve? The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove of course. Taking place ten years after Christopher Moore's original Pine Cove novel, the sleepy little town has survived the tourist season and is getting ready to wind down and get on with life. But when the town psychiatrist decides to take everyone of their anti-depressants and put them on placebos instead, this cozy little town goes crazy. To make matters worse, an unexplained wave of horniness has overtaken the residents of pine cove. And you know what they say about horny depressed people. Right?I read this book while at work and I imagine I looked like a crazy person from laughing out loud so much. This book will make you laugh out loud too. Moore is able to expertly mix humor and plot, wit and story. He can make you laugh and keep you reading. Although it's probably best not to do it while on the job. Learned that one the way.more
A silly story of a giant sea monster that comes to shore in the sleepy tourist town of Pine Cove, CA. The monster can send brainwaves to those around it, making them give themselves up to be his meal, or making them very horny. At the same time, the town's psychiatrist, feeling guilty that one of her patients has committed suicide, decides she has been over-medicating her patients and puts them all on placebos. Large-scale drug withdrawal + mind-altering sea monster = silly things.I guess I'm just not much of a Christopher Moore fan. Like other books of his that I've read, this one is funny, but not laugh out loud funny. The characters are endearing and likeable. But the book doesn't quite get the absurdism right, somehow. It's too absurd to be realistic, but not absurd enough to be a total fantasy. I listened to the audiobook, and the narrator was wonderful.more
Pine Cove has some of the strangest characters...a pot smoking constable, a barmaid with more spare parts than Robocop, a pharmacist with an unnatural attraction to marine animals, a washed-up blues singer on the run from a giant lizard. Everybody in town suddenly begins to act a little crazy and it's not even because the local psychiatrist has replaced her patients' antidepressants with sugar pills.I never thought I would read a love scene between a retired B-movie starlet (ala Xena Warrior Princess) and an enormous color-changing luminescent dragon with a 7 ft, um, member. Thank you, Mr. Moore.more
Once again, Christopher Moore does not disappoint. This, along with Bloodsucking Fiends and You Suck, were among the first of Moore's books I picked up. This book had been sitting neglected on my bookshelf for too long a time. Glad I finally had the sense to pick it up. I couldn't put it down. While I'm now no longer a stranger to Moore's zany plots and characters, he continues to blow my mind with characters and situations that seem beyond belief but yet still very relatable. While I've personally had no experience whatsoever with 100 foot long sea beasts named Steve, Moore's story-telling abilities makes it seem completely believable. And while some may say the main/supporting cast have some rather bizarre quirks, it's this and how those quirks shape their behavior that makes them all the more engaging. As in the previous books by Moore that I've read, the author has tied in a setting and character(s) from another of his stories, which is next on my list. If it's anything like this book, I'll be in for another fun ride. I'm hooked.more
OK any book that has a monster names Steve can not be all bad. This auther never gets boring and you can not help but snicker as you read along.more
Very funny with an excellent narrator (Audiobook).more
This was my favorite of the three Pine Cove books. Here we get what Moore does best — a colorful cast of characters mired in an extremely unusual situation. In this case, there’s a mysterious sea beast in town, making the newly un-drugged residents of Pine Cove somewhat… amorous. Constable Theo Crowe knows *something* is going on, but he’s not too sure what. All he knows is that he doesn’t believe housewife Bess Leander killed herself, and it’s up to him to find out who really killed her. The only one who really has an idea of what is going on is mostly-out-of-her-mind ex-B-movie-queen Molly Michon, and who’s going to believe her? This is the Moore I first enjoyed with A Dirty Job.more
A Sea Monster visits a semi-sleepy California coastal town. Molly, the crazy person, Theo, the kind-of-a-cop and other colorful residents confront the BIG fella while temporarily taken off of anti-depressants by the Val, the psychiatrist.more
'Lust Lizard' sees a return to the sleepy town of Pine Cove, some ten years after the absurd happenings of 'Practical Demonkeeping'. There is no reason to read Demonkeeping first since Lust Lizard is a self-contained story and only uses Pine Cove as a backdrop, the continuity between books is almost non-existent. The central theme is that of a lizard as old as the dinosaurs, (which makes people horny) who turns up amidst a town of habitually depressed people (who are missing there anti-depressants). Expect anything different from Moore, who is consistently producing curveball material? There are several other plotlines, all intersecting throughout the novel, it's cleverly plotted stuff. The only negative point is that Lizard is not a directly funny as Moore's other works. It's imaginative, daring, incredulous and will keep you interested until the finale. A recommended read, but be aware that there are better Moore books out there.more
When thinking about this book, the words "wild" and "romp" immediately push themselves to the front of the mind. A mystery disguised in sex-filled gonzo-type hallucinogenic humor, "The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove" is a quick, easy, and very rewarding read. Moore is a genius in his particular craft, and will happily leave the reader wanting to subject themselves to more of his imagination.more
Oh, how does one begin to summarize the plot of a Christopher Moore book. This time let us not even try but instead let's take a glimpse into the characters in this novel. First and foremost, we have Steve, sea monster, who has recently woken from a long sleep and has come ashore in Pine Cove. Steve has an unusual way of catching prey, he sends off pheromones that make any nearby mammals "horny" and they seek him out. This plays particular havoc on Pine Cove's population as the local shrink, Valerie, has just decided to take all her patients off antidepressants (about 1/3 of the population) and try talking to her patients instead of just medicating them. Then there is local constable Theophilus Crowe, a pothead, who had been given the job to keep Pine Cone off the local sherrif's hands, as he is too busy working his meth empire to bother with policing sleepy Pine Cove. By no means the last and certainly not the least, there is Molly Michon, aging warrior actress in Italian movies who dresses daily in her Warrior Queen outfit and works out with her broadsword, but known to the locals as "the crazy lady".A hilarious romp, this somewhat of a sequel to the first Pine Cove book, Practical Demonkeeping, and is by far a better read. Hilarious, far-fetched, un-politically correct and a down right page-turner. I really enjoyed this. Moore is not for everyone but if you like your humour a little over the top and don't mind some well-placed vulgarity you'll enjoy this ride with the citizens of Pine Cove.more
Christopher Moore is, as always, a genius when it comes to the absurd and warped sense of humor that I enjoy oh-so-much. Who else could give us a plot that includes all of the following: a former B movie starlet who still lives the life of her most famous role as Kendra: Warrior Babe of the Wasteland, a sea beast with a vendetta against a wayward bluesman, a psychologist who decides to put the entire town on placebo anti-depressants instead of the real deal, a pharmacist with a fish fetish (yes, that's right), meth labs and drug dealers, interspecies love, and occasional chapters told from the point of view of a labrador retriever named Skinner? This is not for everyone--serious people need not apply. The plot is wacky and unbelievable; in other words, vintage Moore. While I really enjoyed the book and laughed often, the only reason I gave it 3 stars is that, when compared with his other books, I didn't like it quite as much as Bloodsucking Fiends and Fluke (Or I Know Why the Winged Whale Sings). However, the novel is well worth the time of anyone who already enjoys Moore or is discovering him for the first time.more
I love Christopher Moore, and this is probably my favorite book of his. I love the Pine Cove books. The funny, wacky take on life in a strange little town on the California coast.This book has a recently awakened sea monster, a whole community secretly taken off their meds by the town psychologist, a washed up B movie action star, who has trouble determining if she is the actress, or the actual character much of the time, a drugged out police officer, and a dog who relentlessly pursues his master who he thinks of as 'the food guy'.The setting is good, the characters are interesting and quirky, but still real, and the story is funny as hell.more
Funny, sexy, and extremely odd. Great for readers who are looking for some brain candy and like, Terry Pratchet, Carl Hiasan and Tom Robinsmore
Christopher Moore has a funny way about him. He creates some fantastic characters who end up in unworldly situations. I would recommend any Christopher Moore book to anyone willing to listen. If someone enjoys the likes of Tom Holt or Douglas Adams they will love Moore's writing.The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove is not by any means one of Moore's best books, but it is still worth the read. Contained within these pages is a lizard who can take on the form of a mobile home, a bartender who is more like the bionic woman than human, a blues singer who gets the blues knocked off of him and a Stepford wife who kills herself or did she?more
This takes place in the same weird little coastal California town as Stupidest Angel but pre-dates it. I feel like taking a shower after using this word, but it really describes Moore's novels: zany. There's a radiation leak, a giant sea-beast, a schizophrenic former action movie babe, and an entire town that's just gone off their meds. Somehow Moore makes it work, and it's delightful. This won't be the last of his novels that I read.more
In the small town of Pine Cove in northern California, September is usually a pretty laid back time of year. The tourists are mostly gone and the inhabitants settle in for an uneventful autumn and quiet winter. But this year, three unusual things happened in Pine Cove that changed September. Not big things by Big City standards, but enough to knock the status quo cock-eyed: a tiny, barely noticeable leak opened in a cooling pipe at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant 40 miles to the south; Mavis Sand hired a Blues singer to play through the winter at the Head of the Slug Saloon; and Bess Leander, housewife and mother of two, hung herself.The tiny trace of radioactive water wafting along the ocean's floor tickled the nose of a sleeping 5000 year old sea monster (who had once eaten a Russian nuclear sub and remembers the "buzz" he got from it) and he is roused from his slumber to follow the tantalizing aroma, hungry and very horny after his long nap. At just that time, the village's psychiatrist, Dr. Val Riordan, develops a case of the guilts, thinking that her penchant for writing antidepressant prescriptions as the cure-all for her patients might have been part of the cause of Bess's sudden suicide, and makes a deal with the local pharmacist to switch all her patients to placebos for a while and start having actual sessions with them, just to see what happens. The sea monster exudes a subliminal signal that tittilates the libido looking for a mate, and between that and the townsfolk's normal libidos kicking back in after being squelched by the Prozac for so long, suddenly the people are behaving like sex starved teenagers after prom. And watching it all is the perplexed Theophilus Crowe, a constantly stoned old hippie hired as Constable by an unscrupulous county sheriff who has shady dealings on the side. Throw in a motley assortment of townsfolk (like the schizophrenic former B-movie star, Molly Michon and crusty bartender Mavis Sand) and you've got a recipe for a very funny story.This book was a sheer delight to read and I caught myself chuckling throughout the whole thing. Sorry to see this one end. It gets a high 5 from me. Very entertaining.more
Those who enjoy Christopher Moore's irreverent take on the world will enjoy this book. It's a solid story about a prehistoric shape shifting lizard who messes with the chemical receptors in animals' brains to draw them to it to feed, and the woman who loved it. Told from the perspective of several characters (including the Lust Lizard itself, or Steve, as he was also known), the story maintained a good momentum from start to finish. An enjoyable, light read.more
Written in Christopher Moore's signature Pine Cove style, this book is a load of laughs. From beginning to end it's a wonderful novel, and for the moment it'll be the last one I read. I've read everything by Moore to this point, and this is one of my favourites. It's quite an amusing story, and I definitely recommend it to someone looking for a laugh. Well worth the short time it'll take you to read it.more
This is the fifth book I have read by Christopher Moore. It was a good choice after reading Blood Meridian, as it cleansed my system of the willies precipitated by the deep philosophical ruminations so often sponge-bathed in the sweat-distilled bloodstains upon the dry desert floor, or on the equally weatherworn dusters of those among us who would kill in the face of opportunity and not think twice.But enough of such prior ill vibrations. This particular book, The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, is a typical offering by Christopher Moore, a giant among current pontificators of all things gonzo. Take one part psychiatrist with an overdose in conscience, the town constable whose "Sneaky Pete" and victory garden are his only best friends, another part the local pharmacist with an overly eager taste for the cetacean variety, a mega-mechanized bar owner itching to grease her own wheels (literally speaking), and an aging actress past her prime of defending the Outland for aspiring Warrior Babes the world over. That should be about enough, except for the pinch of a Nat'chal bluesman looking for work, and a dash of gigantic sea beast looking for love being the fuse for havoc erupting in the unsuspecting hamlet of Pine Cove.As one can tell, this is a tale where the sum of its parts is truly greater than the whole, or however the phrase goes. Even Moore describes this in the prologue, whereby Pine Cove serves as the powderkeg ignited by three seemingly separate, mutually exclusive occurrences . Such is the style of Moore, a writer who with a talent for both the whimsical and noir can consistently whip up something so humorous, bizarre and at the same time strangely believable, that a sloth of a reader like myself will finish the novel faster than a shark smelling newly dumped chum in the ocean. I get too caught up in the parts to even hypothesize how the whole will conclude itself; yet it always seems to happen, and it's just a fun time floating throughout the whole experience.There is a bit of cultural commentary treading just below the surface in this story. The plot revolves around drugs, and our decisions and indecisions to take them (or not), whether they be prescribed, OTC, or illegally obtained. It underscores the grandioseness of the sea beast's shenanigans in this nutty town, but Moore does pose the scenario, from multiple points of view.I'm not sure it's my favorite book from Moore, but it's every bit enjoyable as his other books I've read. Quite funny, quite weird, quite entertaining.more
This was the second Chris Moore book that I read. While truly nothing can come close to Lamb, he certainly did not dissapoint. While the story takes a little bit of time to establish itself, the constant Moore comedy makes the first few chapters entertaining, and leads to wonderful hilarity. I must apologize to the person who sat next to me on the plane, as I am sure my constant laughter kept them awake the whole time. Moore's ability to mix fantasy with reality leaves readers at a comfortable distance from reality while maintaining the possibility that the events "could happen." A great read for anyone who wants to laugh.more
Read all 44 reviews

Reviews

Not his best book, but funny none the lessmore
My least favorite Moore book so far. This one was just boring.more
Christopher Moore never disappoints me. The story was fun, with hilarious characters, and a happy ending (for most of the characters).more
Multiple POVs, each chapter with the name of the POV character as title, although the dog's thoughts also showed up. Pothead constable, sea monsters, aging barbarian film princess, corrupt sheriff, murder, drugs, sex, blues, booze, and explosions in a small California tourist town. Oh, and sex, too. Yes. Yes! Hi-larious. I love this bit of description, particularly the second sentence: “Catfish Jefferson put down his National steel guitar and picked up the two-gallon pickle jar that held his tips. Dollar bills spilled over the top, change skated in the bottom, and here and there in the middle fives and tens struggled for air. There was even a twenty down there, and Catfish dug in after it like a kid going for a Cracker Jack prize."more
I totally judged a book by its title with this one when I found it in the clearance pile at my local bookstore years ago. This was my first Christopher Moore book and I was hooked from the beginning; I laughed so hard in so many places and have done so many, many times over the years of reading and re-reading this book!more
I thought the story line was clever and well tied together. The characters were well-developed, funny and imaginative. The sexual themes to me, diminished a pretty good storyline. Despite the reviews, I did not find the book humorous.more
This wild roller coaster ride of a book is like a spoof of my favorite type of horror story – the kind where the menacing monster comes to terrorize the isolated small town. In this case, the small town is on the California coast, and the monster is a gigantic, prehistoric sea monster/dragon, with a long memory and an unquenchable lust for just about everything, from gasoline trucks to a former B-movie actress.When the “lust lizard” comes to town, he makes the whole town go horny, bringing together some very unlikely couples. As in all good small-town horror stories, we get to know a variety of kooky characters (and one kooky dog), who all must work together in the end to defeat – or do I mean save? – the monster. Only this time, the horror story isn’t horrible, but uproariously funny.more
What do you get when you cross a town full of depressed people with a prehistoric sea creature named Steve? The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove of course. Taking place ten years after Christopher Moore's original Pine Cove novel, the sleepy little town has survived the tourist season and is getting ready to wind down and get on with life. But when the town psychiatrist decides to take everyone of their anti-depressants and put them on placebos instead, this cozy little town goes crazy. To make matters worse, an unexplained wave of horniness has overtaken the residents of pine cove. And you know what they say about horny depressed people. Right?I read this book while at work and I imagine I looked like a crazy person from laughing out loud so much. This book will make you laugh out loud too. Moore is able to expertly mix humor and plot, wit and story. He can make you laugh and keep you reading. Although it's probably best not to do it while on the job. Learned that one the way.more
A silly story of a giant sea monster that comes to shore in the sleepy tourist town of Pine Cove, CA. The monster can send brainwaves to those around it, making them give themselves up to be his meal, or making them very horny. At the same time, the town's psychiatrist, feeling guilty that one of her patients has committed suicide, decides she has been over-medicating her patients and puts them all on placebos. Large-scale drug withdrawal + mind-altering sea monster = silly things.I guess I'm just not much of a Christopher Moore fan. Like other books of his that I've read, this one is funny, but not laugh out loud funny. The characters are endearing and likeable. But the book doesn't quite get the absurdism right, somehow. It's too absurd to be realistic, but not absurd enough to be a total fantasy. I listened to the audiobook, and the narrator was wonderful.more
Pine Cove has some of the strangest characters...a pot smoking constable, a barmaid with more spare parts than Robocop, a pharmacist with an unnatural attraction to marine animals, a washed-up blues singer on the run from a giant lizard. Everybody in town suddenly begins to act a little crazy and it's not even because the local psychiatrist has replaced her patients' antidepressants with sugar pills.I never thought I would read a love scene between a retired B-movie starlet (ala Xena Warrior Princess) and an enormous color-changing luminescent dragon with a 7 ft, um, member. Thank you, Mr. Moore.more
Once again, Christopher Moore does not disappoint. This, along with Bloodsucking Fiends and You Suck, were among the first of Moore's books I picked up. This book had been sitting neglected on my bookshelf for too long a time. Glad I finally had the sense to pick it up. I couldn't put it down. While I'm now no longer a stranger to Moore's zany plots and characters, he continues to blow my mind with characters and situations that seem beyond belief but yet still very relatable. While I've personally had no experience whatsoever with 100 foot long sea beasts named Steve, Moore's story-telling abilities makes it seem completely believable. And while some may say the main/supporting cast have some rather bizarre quirks, it's this and how those quirks shape their behavior that makes them all the more engaging. As in the previous books by Moore that I've read, the author has tied in a setting and character(s) from another of his stories, which is next on my list. If it's anything like this book, I'll be in for another fun ride. I'm hooked.more
OK any book that has a monster names Steve can not be all bad. This auther never gets boring and you can not help but snicker as you read along.more
Very funny with an excellent narrator (Audiobook).more
This was my favorite of the three Pine Cove books. Here we get what Moore does best — a colorful cast of characters mired in an extremely unusual situation. In this case, there’s a mysterious sea beast in town, making the newly un-drugged residents of Pine Cove somewhat… amorous. Constable Theo Crowe knows *something* is going on, but he’s not too sure what. All he knows is that he doesn’t believe housewife Bess Leander killed herself, and it’s up to him to find out who really killed her. The only one who really has an idea of what is going on is mostly-out-of-her-mind ex-B-movie-queen Molly Michon, and who’s going to believe her? This is the Moore I first enjoyed with A Dirty Job.more
A Sea Monster visits a semi-sleepy California coastal town. Molly, the crazy person, Theo, the kind-of-a-cop and other colorful residents confront the BIG fella while temporarily taken off of anti-depressants by the Val, the psychiatrist.more
'Lust Lizard' sees a return to the sleepy town of Pine Cove, some ten years after the absurd happenings of 'Practical Demonkeeping'. There is no reason to read Demonkeeping first since Lust Lizard is a self-contained story and only uses Pine Cove as a backdrop, the continuity between books is almost non-existent. The central theme is that of a lizard as old as the dinosaurs, (which makes people horny) who turns up amidst a town of habitually depressed people (who are missing there anti-depressants). Expect anything different from Moore, who is consistently producing curveball material? There are several other plotlines, all intersecting throughout the novel, it's cleverly plotted stuff. The only negative point is that Lizard is not a directly funny as Moore's other works. It's imaginative, daring, incredulous and will keep you interested until the finale. A recommended read, but be aware that there are better Moore books out there.more
When thinking about this book, the words "wild" and "romp" immediately push themselves to the front of the mind. A mystery disguised in sex-filled gonzo-type hallucinogenic humor, "The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove" is a quick, easy, and very rewarding read. Moore is a genius in his particular craft, and will happily leave the reader wanting to subject themselves to more of his imagination.more
Oh, how does one begin to summarize the plot of a Christopher Moore book. This time let us not even try but instead let's take a glimpse into the characters in this novel. First and foremost, we have Steve, sea monster, who has recently woken from a long sleep and has come ashore in Pine Cove. Steve has an unusual way of catching prey, he sends off pheromones that make any nearby mammals "horny" and they seek him out. This plays particular havoc on Pine Cove's population as the local shrink, Valerie, has just decided to take all her patients off antidepressants (about 1/3 of the population) and try talking to her patients instead of just medicating them. Then there is local constable Theophilus Crowe, a pothead, who had been given the job to keep Pine Cone off the local sherrif's hands, as he is too busy working his meth empire to bother with policing sleepy Pine Cove. By no means the last and certainly not the least, there is Molly Michon, aging warrior actress in Italian movies who dresses daily in her Warrior Queen outfit and works out with her broadsword, but known to the locals as "the crazy lady".A hilarious romp, this somewhat of a sequel to the first Pine Cove book, Practical Demonkeeping, and is by far a better read. Hilarious, far-fetched, un-politically correct and a down right page-turner. I really enjoyed this. Moore is not for everyone but if you like your humour a little over the top and don't mind some well-placed vulgarity you'll enjoy this ride with the citizens of Pine Cove.more
Christopher Moore is, as always, a genius when it comes to the absurd and warped sense of humor that I enjoy oh-so-much. Who else could give us a plot that includes all of the following: a former B movie starlet who still lives the life of her most famous role as Kendra: Warrior Babe of the Wasteland, a sea beast with a vendetta against a wayward bluesman, a psychologist who decides to put the entire town on placebo anti-depressants instead of the real deal, a pharmacist with a fish fetish (yes, that's right), meth labs and drug dealers, interspecies love, and occasional chapters told from the point of view of a labrador retriever named Skinner? This is not for everyone--serious people need not apply. The plot is wacky and unbelievable; in other words, vintage Moore. While I really enjoyed the book and laughed often, the only reason I gave it 3 stars is that, when compared with his other books, I didn't like it quite as much as Bloodsucking Fiends and Fluke (Or I Know Why the Winged Whale Sings). However, the novel is well worth the time of anyone who already enjoys Moore or is discovering him for the first time.more
I love Christopher Moore, and this is probably my favorite book of his. I love the Pine Cove books. The funny, wacky take on life in a strange little town on the California coast.This book has a recently awakened sea monster, a whole community secretly taken off their meds by the town psychologist, a washed up B movie action star, who has trouble determining if she is the actress, or the actual character much of the time, a drugged out police officer, and a dog who relentlessly pursues his master who he thinks of as 'the food guy'.The setting is good, the characters are interesting and quirky, but still real, and the story is funny as hell.more
Funny, sexy, and extremely odd. Great for readers who are looking for some brain candy and like, Terry Pratchet, Carl Hiasan and Tom Robinsmore
Christopher Moore has a funny way about him. He creates some fantastic characters who end up in unworldly situations. I would recommend any Christopher Moore book to anyone willing to listen. If someone enjoys the likes of Tom Holt or Douglas Adams they will love Moore's writing.The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove is not by any means one of Moore's best books, but it is still worth the read. Contained within these pages is a lizard who can take on the form of a mobile home, a bartender who is more like the bionic woman than human, a blues singer who gets the blues knocked off of him and a Stepford wife who kills herself or did she?more
This takes place in the same weird little coastal California town as Stupidest Angel but pre-dates it. I feel like taking a shower after using this word, but it really describes Moore's novels: zany. There's a radiation leak, a giant sea-beast, a schizophrenic former action movie babe, and an entire town that's just gone off their meds. Somehow Moore makes it work, and it's delightful. This won't be the last of his novels that I read.more
In the small town of Pine Cove in northern California, September is usually a pretty laid back time of year. The tourists are mostly gone and the inhabitants settle in for an uneventful autumn and quiet winter. But this year, three unusual things happened in Pine Cove that changed September. Not big things by Big City standards, but enough to knock the status quo cock-eyed: a tiny, barely noticeable leak opened in a cooling pipe at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant 40 miles to the south; Mavis Sand hired a Blues singer to play through the winter at the Head of the Slug Saloon; and Bess Leander, housewife and mother of two, hung herself.The tiny trace of radioactive water wafting along the ocean's floor tickled the nose of a sleeping 5000 year old sea monster (who had once eaten a Russian nuclear sub and remembers the "buzz" he got from it) and he is roused from his slumber to follow the tantalizing aroma, hungry and very horny after his long nap. At just that time, the village's psychiatrist, Dr. Val Riordan, develops a case of the guilts, thinking that her penchant for writing antidepressant prescriptions as the cure-all for her patients might have been part of the cause of Bess's sudden suicide, and makes a deal with the local pharmacist to switch all her patients to placebos for a while and start having actual sessions with them, just to see what happens. The sea monster exudes a subliminal signal that tittilates the libido looking for a mate, and between that and the townsfolk's normal libidos kicking back in after being squelched by the Prozac for so long, suddenly the people are behaving like sex starved teenagers after prom. And watching it all is the perplexed Theophilus Crowe, a constantly stoned old hippie hired as Constable by an unscrupulous county sheriff who has shady dealings on the side. Throw in a motley assortment of townsfolk (like the schizophrenic former B-movie star, Molly Michon and crusty bartender Mavis Sand) and you've got a recipe for a very funny story.This book was a sheer delight to read and I caught myself chuckling throughout the whole thing. Sorry to see this one end. It gets a high 5 from me. Very entertaining.more
Those who enjoy Christopher Moore's irreverent take on the world will enjoy this book. It's a solid story about a prehistoric shape shifting lizard who messes with the chemical receptors in animals' brains to draw them to it to feed, and the woman who loved it. Told from the perspective of several characters (including the Lust Lizard itself, or Steve, as he was also known), the story maintained a good momentum from start to finish. An enjoyable, light read.more
Written in Christopher Moore's signature Pine Cove style, this book is a load of laughs. From beginning to end it's a wonderful novel, and for the moment it'll be the last one I read. I've read everything by Moore to this point, and this is one of my favourites. It's quite an amusing story, and I definitely recommend it to someone looking for a laugh. Well worth the short time it'll take you to read it.more
This is the fifth book I have read by Christopher Moore. It was a good choice after reading Blood Meridian, as it cleansed my system of the willies precipitated by the deep philosophical ruminations so often sponge-bathed in the sweat-distilled bloodstains upon the dry desert floor, or on the equally weatherworn dusters of those among us who would kill in the face of opportunity and not think twice.But enough of such prior ill vibrations. This particular book, The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, is a typical offering by Christopher Moore, a giant among current pontificators of all things gonzo. Take one part psychiatrist with an overdose in conscience, the town constable whose "Sneaky Pete" and victory garden are his only best friends, another part the local pharmacist with an overly eager taste for the cetacean variety, a mega-mechanized bar owner itching to grease her own wheels (literally speaking), and an aging actress past her prime of defending the Outland for aspiring Warrior Babes the world over. That should be about enough, except for the pinch of a Nat'chal bluesman looking for work, and a dash of gigantic sea beast looking for love being the fuse for havoc erupting in the unsuspecting hamlet of Pine Cove.As one can tell, this is a tale where the sum of its parts is truly greater than the whole, or however the phrase goes. Even Moore describes this in the prologue, whereby Pine Cove serves as the powderkeg ignited by three seemingly separate, mutually exclusive occurrences . Such is the style of Moore, a writer who with a talent for both the whimsical and noir can consistently whip up something so humorous, bizarre and at the same time strangely believable, that a sloth of a reader like myself will finish the novel faster than a shark smelling newly dumped chum in the ocean. I get too caught up in the parts to even hypothesize how the whole will conclude itself; yet it always seems to happen, and it's just a fun time floating throughout the whole experience.There is a bit of cultural commentary treading just below the surface in this story. The plot revolves around drugs, and our decisions and indecisions to take them (or not), whether they be prescribed, OTC, or illegally obtained. It underscores the grandioseness of the sea beast's shenanigans in this nutty town, but Moore does pose the scenario, from multiple points of view.I'm not sure it's my favorite book from Moore, but it's every bit enjoyable as his other books I've read. Quite funny, quite weird, quite entertaining.more
This was the second Chris Moore book that I read. While truly nothing can come close to Lamb, he certainly did not dissapoint. While the story takes a little bit of time to establish itself, the constant Moore comedy makes the first few chapters entertaining, and leads to wonderful hilarity. I must apologize to the person who sat next to me on the plane, as I am sure my constant laughter kept them awake the whole time. Moore's ability to mix fantasy with reality leaves readers at a comfortable distance from reality while maintaining the possibility that the events "could happen." A great read for anyone who wants to laugh.more
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