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There is a distinct hint of Armageddon in the air. According to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (recorded, thankfully, in 1655, before she blew up her entire village and all its inhabitants, who had gathered to watch her burn), the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. So the armies of Good and Evil are amassing, the Four Bikers of the Apocalypse are revving up their mighty hogs and hitting the road, and the world's last two remaining witch-finders are getting ready to fight the good fight, armed with awkwardly antiquated instructions and stick pins. Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, tempers are flaring. . . . Right. Everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan.

Except that a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon -- each of whom has lived among Earth's mortals for many millennia and has grown rather fond of the lifestyle -- are not particularly looking forward to the coming Rapture. If Crowley and Aziraphale are going to stop it from happening, they've got to find and kill the Antichrist (which is a shame, as he's a really nice kid). There's just one glitch: someone seems to have misplaced him. . . .

First published in 1990, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett's brilliantly dark and screamingly funny take on humankind's final judgment is back -- and just in time -- in a new hardcover edition (which includes an introduction by the authors, comments by each about the other, and answers to some still-burning questions about their wildly popular collaborative effort) that the devout and the damned alike will surely cherish until the end of all things.

Topics: Witches, England, Speculative Fiction, Parody, Black Humor, Adventurous, Satirical, Apocalypse, Angels, Demons, Supernatural Powers, Prophecies, Satan, British Author, Death, Heaven, Hell, Postmodern, and Collaborations

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061991127
List price: $6.99
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It started off great. The concept is amazing and amusing, characters are intriguing and are starting to develop well, the whole idea of satirizing religion and how people take it seriously in such intelligent and 'elegant' way, by imagining what could possibly go wrong if the religious predictions were to come true, is refreshing, and from the moment I started reading the book, I couldn't put it down because I so wanted to see what will happen next, and still, despite that, there were many parts where I just stopped and paused, cause the whole story is full of ideas and things that just make you wonder and think about them, or explore them further if they have already crossed your mind. And when you laugh, you in a way laugh at yourself in the same way Adams makes you do in The Guide. But what disappointed me most, is the ending. It's like one third of the book is missing or something. Hills were shaking, a mouse was born. You expect something really special, and you get....hmm. Everything unfolded to quickly. Like they got bored with writing it, and the just wanted it to end. It was way to naïve and simple. The characters that were introduced in such a big way, so you expected them to do something big, and important simply vanished in a way that you start wondering why were they even there?! (I'm speaking of course about the 4 horsemen of the Apocalypse, and I have to add that the concept of Pollution really amazed me since in the Bible the fourth rider besides Death, War and Famine is not so clearly defined as the other 3, so thumbs up for Gaiman's and Pratchett's interpretation, warning in a way). Like I said, generally, very amusing and intelligent, too bad about the sloppy ending. Otherwise, it would be whole 5 stars. (P.s. It would be really great if somehow they would change their minds and decided to write a sequel, so I'm hoping for that.)more
I've always loved Good Omens -- it's irreverent and wise-cracking without getting annoying, even when it's irreverent about things that are or were important to me. It's not laughing at people who believe in Christianity, despite the potential there, and it's not scrapping the whole religion either. Nor is it completely condemning the other side, the demons. Aziraphale and Crowley balance each other out nicely, and balance the portrayal of both sides.

The audiobook version is really good: it's read by a single narrator, not acted out by various different people, but the narrator 'does the voices', and manages to create a distinct sound for every character that does justice to how I imagine them sounding.

I was listening to it while I was crocheting, and I could crochet on for hours with this on without realising -- I suspect it'd be very good for keeping the mind lively on long drives and so on, and I know it kept me entertained while I was ill. It didn't seem to have many natural breaks, though; not one to put on for short car rides, I don't think.more
Young adult/ adult
As a fan of both Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, I started reading this book with some trepidation-- when multiple authors are involved, it's a very rare thing that the whole will be greater than the sum of its parts. But this is the exception that proves the rule: both authors shine in this satirical and hysterical look at the final days. These guys know their Bible, and I'm guessing that they even gave God a chuckle.more
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Reviews

It started off great. The concept is amazing and amusing, characters are intriguing and are starting to develop well, the whole idea of satirizing religion and how people take it seriously in such intelligent and 'elegant' way, by imagining what could possibly go wrong if the religious predictions were to come true, is refreshing, and from the moment I started reading the book, I couldn't put it down because I so wanted to see what will happen next, and still, despite that, there were many parts where I just stopped and paused, cause the whole story is full of ideas and things that just make you wonder and think about them, or explore them further if they have already crossed your mind. And when you laugh, you in a way laugh at yourself in the same way Adams makes you do in The Guide. But what disappointed me most, is the ending. It's like one third of the book is missing or something. Hills were shaking, a mouse was born. You expect something really special, and you get....hmm. Everything unfolded to quickly. Like they got bored with writing it, and the just wanted it to end. It was way to naïve and simple. The characters that were introduced in such a big way, so you expected them to do something big, and important simply vanished in a way that you start wondering why were they even there?! (I'm speaking of course about the 4 horsemen of the Apocalypse, and I have to add that the concept of Pollution really amazed me since in the Bible the fourth rider besides Death, War and Famine is not so clearly defined as the other 3, so thumbs up for Gaiman's and Pratchett's interpretation, warning in a way). Like I said, generally, very amusing and intelligent, too bad about the sloppy ending. Otherwise, it would be whole 5 stars. (P.s. It would be really great if somehow they would change their minds and decided to write a sequel, so I'm hoping for that.)more
I've always loved Good Omens -- it's irreverent and wise-cracking without getting annoying, even when it's irreverent about things that are or were important to me. It's not laughing at people who believe in Christianity, despite the potential there, and it's not scrapping the whole religion either. Nor is it completely condemning the other side, the demons. Aziraphale and Crowley balance each other out nicely, and balance the portrayal of both sides.

The audiobook version is really good: it's read by a single narrator, not acted out by various different people, but the narrator 'does the voices', and manages to create a distinct sound for every character that does justice to how I imagine them sounding.

I was listening to it while I was crocheting, and I could crochet on for hours with this on without realising -- I suspect it'd be very good for keeping the mind lively on long drives and so on, and I know it kept me entertained while I was ill. It didn't seem to have many natural breaks, though; not one to put on for short car rides, I don't think.more
Young adult/ adult
As a fan of both Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, I started reading this book with some trepidation-- when multiple authors are involved, it's a very rare thing that the whole will be greater than the sum of its parts. But this is the exception that proves the rule: both authors shine in this satirical and hysterical look at the final days. These guys know their Bible, and I'm guessing that they even gave God a chuckle.more
I wanted to love this book, truly. Parts of it were laugh out loud, hysterical, and I found myself highlighting in my eBook as a result. However, I just couldn't seem to get to the end quickly enough. Started out as an audiobook for me and I believe I played the first part 5 times before finally switching to reading it instead. Just didn't grab me.Best parts by far were between Crowley and Aziraphale. Loved them. They are the single reason my rating is as high as it is...more
I didn't laugh out loud but I enjoyed this book. It was entertaining, captivating, and I like that an angel and a demon were friends. Great storytelling, I hardly cared about the writing at all.more
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