Find your next favorite book

Become a member today and read free for 14 days.

Start your free 14 days

There is a distinct hint of Armageddon in the air. According to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (recorded, thankfully, in 1655, before she blew up her entire village and all its inhabitants, who had gathered to watch her burn), the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. So the armies of Good and Evil are amassing, the Four Bikers of the Apocalypse are revving up their mighty hogs and hitting the road, and the world's last two remaining witch-finders are getting ready to fight the good fight, armed with awkwardly antiquated instructions and stick pins. Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, tempers are flaring. . . . Right. Everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan.

Except that a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon -- each of whom has lived among Earth's mortals for many millennia and has grown rather fond of the lifestyle -- are not particularly looking forward to the coming Rapture. If Crowley and Aziraphale are going to stop it from happening, they've got to find and kill the Antichrist (which is a shame, as he's a really nice kid). There's just one glitch: someone seems to have misplaced him. . . .

First published in 1990, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett's brilliantly dark and screamingly funny take on humankind's final judgment is back -- and just in time -- in a new hardcover edition (which includes an introduction by the authors, comments by each about the other, and answers to some still-burning questions about their wildly popular collaborative effort) that the devout and the damned alike will surely cherish until the end of all things.

Topics: Witches, England, Speculative Fiction, Parody, Black Humor, Adventurous, Satirical, Apocalypse, Angels, Demons, Supernatural Powers, Prophecies, Satan, British Author, Death, Heaven, Hell, Postmodern, and Collaborations

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061991127
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Good Omens
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
It started off great. The concept is amazing and amusing, characters are intriguing and are starting to develop well, the whole idea of satirizing religion and how people take it seriously in such intelligent and 'elegant' way, by imagining what could possibly go wrong if the religious predictions were to come true, is refreshing, and from the moment I started reading the book, I couldn't put it down because I so wanted to see what will happen next, and still, despite that, there were many parts where I just stopped and paused, cause the whole story is full of ideas and things that just make you wonder and think about them, or explore them further if they have already crossed your mind. And when you laugh, you in a way laugh at yourself in the same way Adams makes you do in The Guide. But what disappointed me most, is the ending. It's like one third of the book is missing or something. Hills were shaking, a mouse was born. You expect something really special, and you get....hmm. Everything unfolded to quickly. Like they got bored with writing it, and the just wanted it to end. It was way to naïve and simple. The characters that were introduced in such a big way, so you expected them to do something big, and important simply vanished in a way that you start wondering why were they even there?! (I'm speaking of course about the 4 horsemen of the Apocalypse, and I have to add that the concept of Pollution really amazed me since in the Bible the fourth rider besides Death, War and Famine is not so clearly defined as the other 3, so thumbs up for Gaiman's and Pratchett's interpretation, warning in a way). Like I said, generally, very amusing and intelligent, too bad about the sloppy ending. Otherwise, it would be whole 5 stars. (P.s. It would be really great if somehow they would change their minds and decided to write a sequel, so I'm hoping for that.)more
Brilliant. Funny and irreverent without me getting offended on the behalf of my former religion. One I've reread over and over...more
Young adult/ adult
As a fan of both Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, I started reading this book with some trepidation-- when multiple authors are involved, it's a very rare thing that the whole will be greater than the sum of its parts. But this is the exception that proves the rule: both authors shine in this satirical and hysterical look at the final days. These guys know their Bible, and I'm guessing that they even gave God a chuckle.more
I wanted to love this book, truly. Parts of it were laugh out loud, hysterical, and I found myself highlighting in my eBook as a result. However, I just couldn't seem to get to the end quickly enough. Started out as an audiobook for me and I believe I played the first part 5 times before finally switching to reading it instead. Just didn't grab me.Best parts by far were between Crowley and Aziraphale. Loved them. They are the single reason my rating is as high as it is...more
I didn't laugh out loud but I enjoyed this book. It was entertaining, captivating, and I like that an angel and a demon were friends. Great storytelling, I hardly cared about the writing at all.more
As usual, Gaiman (and Pratchett) deliver on all points. This is a crisp, irreverent, funny little gem of a book. It moves along quickly, drawing in all the threads of the plot neatly after itself -- at some points, you think they may have gotten a bit lost, having fun with the characters and the interactions, but in the end it all comes together, as neatly and messily as fantasy ever does.

It's a beautiful piece of work, and it perfectly encapsulates the humor, stubbornness, stupidity, brilliance, cruelties and kindnesses of mankind -- amplified by the choirs of angels and demons, so ready to make war around them in God's name.
more
I like both Pratchett and Gaiman a lot. The combination didn't do much for me. It seemed too self-conscious, not to mention that they were trying too hard. Arch and amusing, yes. Hilarious, no, or at least not to my eye. My favorite part was when Death showed up and he was straight out of Discworld. The whole was chaotic and, oh, I dunno, unformed? Incompletely polished? It didn't work for me in the exact same way that Christopher Moore doesn't work for me.more
Everything you could hope for from a Pratchett/Gaiman joint about the End of Days.more
"famine, war, and pestilence were sucking off their cigarettes
death was just watching, getting off on all the coughing."

This book reminded me of that song. The end of the world, Satan's child, good v./& evil, &c. Funny (clever-funny, mostly) and the story was quite enjoyable, although the characters were too numerous to really care about any of them.more
This was a hoot!

I thoroughly enjoyed this hilarious satire of Armageddon. The AntiChrist as an eleven-year-old boy with a Hellhound masquerading as a rat terrier mongrel. The Four Bikers of the Apocalypse easy riding to the End of the World. And it all started with the Serpent and the guardian Angel from the Garden of Eden. To top it all off, a 17th century witch named Agnes Nutter accurately predicted everything.more
Listened to from September 20 to October 03, 2012Audio Review - I have the same feelings about the audio as I did when reading the book. I really enjoyed it until about two-thirds of the way through and then I lost interest. Still not sure why, but it is what it is. The first two-thirds I REALLY liked though!more
THIS. By the obvious evidence of my rating this five stars and putting it on my “Books Which Are Awesome” shelf, it’s evident that I REALLY LOVE THIS BOOK. (This is actually the first book I read by Pratchett and/or Gaiman in the first place, too.) That, and the fact that I have two copies and plan to get a third to replace one of the two.

The thing about this is that while you’re laughing hysterically or getting wigged out by some of the demons (specifically the maggots; thank you Neil Gaiman), it does have a lot to say. It doesn’t so much condemn religion, but rather looks at the human ideals of good and evil in a greatly different way from a lot of other books. I like that neither Heaven or Hell is presented as wholly wrong nor right, just the two sides of the same coin.

Aziraphale and Crowley have one of the best relationships I’ve read in fiction. Yes, it’s very easy to go and say that they’re an old married couple, but you get the sense in the beginning that they were genuinely good friends who happened to end up on different ideologies. They’re willing to work with each other, even if their end goals are on completely different ends of the spectrum. I also like that they’re not omnipotent—they’ve lived on Earth for millennia but they can still cock up. Massively. The Them do play into a little of stereotype of kid gangs, but I generally liked them. There’s a lot more to Adam’s development that I could have used, but I like that we don’t know everything about his childhood. Adds more to his eventual decision. Anathema does fall into the lines of something like Discworld’s Lancre Witches, but she’s a strong enough character in her own right. My one tiny nitpick of the book is that I really don’t like her relationship with Newt. I like them both as individual characters, and I can see them being attracted to each other…but I don’t like the whole “Oh, well, now we have to sleep with each other because Agnes said so!” Or rather, that Newt and Anathema know about this BEFORE they commit said act. It’s a very quick and somewhat cheap way to progress their relationship, and would have probably been better if they developed their attraction more naturally. (That said though, Agnes Nutter is a BAMF.)

I liked the lampshading of general Apocalyptic plotlines, particularly with the intended Antichrist supposed to go to an American diplomat, and the portrayal of the Four Horsepeople while they’re waiting around for the end to come. (And in Famine’s case, if his ways to keep himself amused may just scare you off of processed food forever.) I love the scenes where you see the effects of Adam’s powers worldwide—while they feel more like isolated incidents, it does give a larger scope of what he’s doing. Also the references and shout-outs are tastefully handled—obvious enough to get the joke, but neither writer beats it into the reader’s skull. (For example, I’ve read this book a number of times. Only this last time do I spot the Doctor Who cameo.)

Being a huge fan of both Gaiman and Pratchett, their writing really compliments the other. The casual observer may think that it wouldn’t work given the kind of books they respectively write, but there’s a similar sense of humor and use of language that both authors use and it works brilliantly. The use of footnotes aside, there’s no large passages that scream “NEIL/TERRY WROTE THIS!” (aside from the ones that the authors have said they had a stronger hand in developing). Which is fantastic—I haven’t run across It often, but I love it when a cowritten book flows just so seamlessly that it feels more like a book rather than “You got your Gaiman in my Pratchett!” etc.

It’s an engaging funny book that still manages to hold up even after repeated readings. Like I mentioned above, I’ve read this hundreds of times, and yet I’m still finding jokes and references and plot devices each time. There’s a reason why I need extra copies, it’s one of those books I want to go to everyone I know and say “You HAVE to read this.”
more
This is a hilarious book that combines the (as I call it) "strangist" genius of Neil Gaiman with the sardonic and sometimes silly humor of Terry Pratchett. It's Armageddon, the end of the world, but with a twist. There are actually wacky hijinks and hilarious misunderstandings. I think what I really like is that various chapters come at you from one character's perception or another (while maintaining omniscience) and what we know that they don't is most of what makes it funny. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and could go on forever, but I'll just say that if you ever thought that heaven and hell were cut and dry, read this. It may be funny and tell a story, but it also takes a look at some deeper emotions as well.more
Rather predictable humor and puns... but fun, nevertheless. A few real laugh out loud moments that make it worth a weekend of reading, like when a character manages to trap another character's essence on an answering machine tape. He then considers tossing it onto the floor of a car he is certain eventually morphs every lost tape into "The Best of Queen"... but decides that is too cruel of a punishment, even for this villain...more
This book was absolutely excellent. Here is my review.

There is a reason this book almost became a movie (and I really wish it had.) It’s unlike anything I’ve ever read before. I admit, there were moments I didn’t appreciate at first. For example, our main character Crowley Aziraphale are the biggest characters and the story always returns to them, but in about 150 pages they disappear from a very long time. Instead, different main characters come into the story and take center. The Thems, Anathema Device, Newt Pulsifer, Sergeant Shadwell, etc. Some characters were also given full pages, when their part was very minor, and could have been cut altogether.
However, as we begin to get to the meat of Armageddon we have begun to get to know these new characters and sense what each role is. Then as if it couldn’t get better, Crowley and Aziraphale come back into the picture.
The ending to a book is so important and even though the middle made me want to slow down my reading, the ending all but made up for it. Expect to see immortals that you’ve heard of before, and some you haven’t. Even the ending, I can’t say for sure but the way a voice came from out of nowhere and disrupted the conversation? I think a very high supreme being was actually there.
The ending with the Antichrist as well, for the last bit? Worth it. Every bit, you couldn’t have asked for a better ending.
more
I have no idea where my original copy got to, but I was thrilled to snag another one and reread it. I love Terry Pratchett, I love Neil Gaiman, and I just adore the sort of madcap British humor that made Douglas Adams so memorable and makes Good Omens just about perfect.more
Another really funny book that I loved. I'd like more of this somehow - sequels, a movie, anything.more
Didn't find it laugh-out-loud funny, but still funny nevertheless. Clever references. Footnotes were sometimes the best part.more
The audiobook version is wonderfully read by British actor Martin Jarvis. Because Jarvis gives each character a unique voice, the story is even more amusing and enjoyable than reading it would be.more
Good Omens, by Gaiman and Pratchett, is a unique, comical take on the coming Apocalypse. The book begins “in the beginning”, in the Garden of Eden, with one angel, Aziraphale, and one demon, Crowley. The two become friends of sorts throughout the ages and even hang out together in the present day. The book delves into their stories while also examining the narratives of several other important people during the final days before the world ends, including the Antichrist. Aziraphale and Crowley both decide that they like Earth very much, thank you, and begin to work together to bring down the Antichrist and avert Armageddon. Unfortunately, as all good plans go, their plans do not go as they would have hoped because someone has misplaced the Antichrist. In the final days before the end of life as everyone knows it, one angel and one demon work together to keep things the same.The book is written in a comical manner with casual hysterical comments tucked into the narrative. Good Omens also has hilarious footnotes explaining various parts of the book, often to Americans “and other city-dwelling life-forms.” It is fairly fast-paced and is told from several different perspectives, which are a little challenging to keep straight in the beginning of the book before one is used to the characters. Overall, this is a one of a kind, laugh-out-loud-type of book that anyone with a sense of humor would enjoy. I strongly recommend this as one of the best books I have read in a long time!Cindy B.more
We had mixed ratings with some of really liking this book and others of us disliking it. We did have some good discussion on the complexity of good and evil and the overlapping borders. We wished we understood British humor a bit more and felt that we missed a lot of the symbolism and tongue-in-cheek humor.more
Laugh out loud funny in almost every chapter. I love Neil Gaiman's novels. My favorite is still American Gods but he certainly out did himself with this little bit of fiction. Delightfully confused characters that make everyone question what really is good and evil. A must read if you are a Neil Gaiman fan or just an end of the world apocalyptic fan.more
A fun and clever novel. It had a very creative premise and was quite funny at times. Has much of the satiric style typical to a Terry Pratchett novel with the added twist of creativity of Neil Gaimen. If you like reading these authors you would definitely enjoy this book.more
Love Neil Gaiman, love Terry Pratchett, love this collaboration most of all. The combination of Pratchett's wittily observed humour and Gaiman's sometimes dark outlook on life is hilarious, and yet this book does have an underlying message. Crowley and Aziraphale are most amusing - I like to think Aziraphale is modelled more after Pratchett, and Crowley more after Gaiman - provide great amusement. 'Oh do come on, angel' is a great line. I have read everything either have in print, and though there are books by both I love - Jingo, American Gods, Stardust, Witches Abroad - this is the one I love best. And though I could never pick a favourite book, this would surely rank in the top five.more
The AntiChrist is mistakenly placed in an ordinary British household, and angels, demons, witches, witch-hunters and the four motorcyclists of the apocalypse all race toward the end of days.This book had me at "Could you tell me your planet's albedo, sir?" on page 187. I was enjoying the whole thing immensely, but that's when the book crossed into "will treasure forever and ever" territory.more
Starting in 2001, my husband has given me books for Christmas. It began with him looking up lists of the year's best books on Salon.com and buying me five or so to wrap in our local free newspaper and put under the four-foot-tall artificial tree I bought in 1999.

In 2003, after we'd moved to California, which cut our income in half and doubled our rent, he stopped buying books and instead began putting library books under the tree along with a promise of uninterrupted time in which to read them. By 2005, our first Christmas with our first child, the time had become an even more valuable commodity than the money.

In 2008, he stopped using reviews of books to choose which to put under the tree for me and started using my own Goodreads to-read list. That is just what he did this year, which means that one of the books I found under our now thirteen-year-old tree was Good Omens. Okay, well, technically I picked the books up from the library myself, wondering why my husband was reading a bunch of books I'd had on my to-read list for ages, but the effect was largely the same. I brought them home, we stuck them (unwrapped) under the tree, and I didn't think about them until Christmas morning.

Good Omens is the first of the bunch I picked up this Christmas break. I read it in three installments, one while my husband took my son to the library and I sat with my pale and vomity daughter, one after everyone else was in bed and the snow fell silently outside the window behind me, and the third this morning while my husband took our well-for-the-moment children to the children's museum.

I found the experience of immersing myself in this book very pleasant. I've been doing a slog through my "currently-reading" list lately and nonfiction just doesn't invite the kind of immersion that a novel does. In addition, I was impressed with the seamless way Pratchett and Gaimen assembled this co-authoring effort, wondering at times if their little jabs at trends in co-parenting might be self-conscious references to their own co-fathering of this book.

Overall, the book has the dry, British wit of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and a decidedly Gaiman-esque flavor especially to the Four Horsemen bits, or at least an American Gods-esque flavor, although I found it less laugh-out-loud funny than the Hitchhiker's trilogy and less well developed than American Gods. Neither of these comparisons is actually fair, though. Gaiman published American Gods fifteen years after Good Omens came out, and one would assume that an author's work would acquire some polish with fifteen years of practice, and I first read Douglas Adams in middle school when I was determined to find anything British hilarious because it seemed esoteric and therefore made me feel special when I laughed at it even if I didn't catch 75% of the jokes. It's possible that, had I picked up Good Omens in middle school (which would have been impossible since it came out the year I started high school), I would have laughed out loud at it. But I'm a jaded 36-year-old who picks up her own Christmas gifts from the library and looks at her child having a stomach bug as "downtime." I think it takes a little more to make me laugh out loud these days.

But I did find Good Omens amusing, and I'm glad I picked it from the Christmas pile first. Now for some lunch, some exercise, and on to the next book.

more
I thought this was hilarious. I do wish I had been to London or was more of an anglophile so I would understand 100% of the jokes rather than... what... maybe 90ish percent? Pratchett and Gaiman definitely did a great job and it was impossible to tell which author was writing which part. I felt it got a little bit long in parts and maybe they stuck in a few too many jokes just for the heck of it (which didn't add to the story whatsoever), but overall I really enjoyed it.more
This is a seriously funny book about the end of the world. Its themes include gentle and not so gentle satire of various religious groups, as well as some serious thinking on the nature of man and the universe. The plot,which revolves around Armageddon, also serves as a vehicle for puns, slapstick, and jokes. Jointly written by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman,the book captures the best qualities of both authors.more
The time has finally come. Now is the time of the end of the world and the final show-off between good and evil. Except things do not quite work out as planned this time lead to many embarrassing and hilarious situations.more
Far too often, my second time reading a book turns into a hunt for the book's flaws, which I must surely have missed the first time through. That was the case with this book, but I came away mostly satisfied.

I say mostly, because (and I realize this is kind of a complaint for the sake of complaining) Good Omens felt just a little too silly for me. Yes, I know that's kind of the point of the book, but I found myself resenting a lot of the asides and footnotes and just the general goofiness of the book. If I had my druthers, someone would have sat down and cut out some of the extra business, but then again, there are reasons that I should never get my hands on my druthers.

It's a fun, irreverent book, all the same. I just think that the overly complicated plot and the excess of characters can get in the way of the fun from time to time.more
Read all 247 reviews

Reviews

It started off great. The concept is amazing and amusing, characters are intriguing and are starting to develop well, the whole idea of satirizing religion and how people take it seriously in such intelligent and 'elegant' way, by imagining what could possibly go wrong if the religious predictions were to come true, is refreshing, and from the moment I started reading the book, I couldn't put it down because I so wanted to see what will happen next, and still, despite that, there were many parts where I just stopped and paused, cause the whole story is full of ideas and things that just make you wonder and think about them, or explore them further if they have already crossed your mind. And when you laugh, you in a way laugh at yourself in the same way Adams makes you do in The Guide. But what disappointed me most, is the ending. It's like one third of the book is missing or something. Hills were shaking, a mouse was born. You expect something really special, and you get....hmm. Everything unfolded to quickly. Like they got bored with writing it, and the just wanted it to end. It was way to naïve and simple. The characters that were introduced in such a big way, so you expected them to do something big, and important simply vanished in a way that you start wondering why were they even there?! (I'm speaking of course about the 4 horsemen of the Apocalypse, and I have to add that the concept of Pollution really amazed me since in the Bible the fourth rider besides Death, War and Famine is not so clearly defined as the other 3, so thumbs up for Gaiman's and Pratchett's interpretation, warning in a way). Like I said, generally, very amusing and intelligent, too bad about the sloppy ending. Otherwise, it would be whole 5 stars. (P.s. It would be really great if somehow they would change their minds and decided to write a sequel, so I'm hoping for that.)more
Brilliant. Funny and irreverent without me getting offended on the behalf of my former religion. One I've reread over and over...more
Young adult/ adult
As a fan of both Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, I started reading this book with some trepidation-- when multiple authors are involved, it's a very rare thing that the whole will be greater than the sum of its parts. But this is the exception that proves the rule: both authors shine in this satirical and hysterical look at the final days. These guys know their Bible, and I'm guessing that they even gave God a chuckle.more
I wanted to love this book, truly. Parts of it were laugh out loud, hysterical, and I found myself highlighting in my eBook as a result. However, I just couldn't seem to get to the end quickly enough. Started out as an audiobook for me and I believe I played the first part 5 times before finally switching to reading it instead. Just didn't grab me.Best parts by far were between Crowley and Aziraphale. Loved them. They are the single reason my rating is as high as it is...more
I didn't laugh out loud but I enjoyed this book. It was entertaining, captivating, and I like that an angel and a demon were friends. Great storytelling, I hardly cared about the writing at all.more
As usual, Gaiman (and Pratchett) deliver on all points. This is a crisp, irreverent, funny little gem of a book. It moves along quickly, drawing in all the threads of the plot neatly after itself -- at some points, you think they may have gotten a bit lost, having fun with the characters and the interactions, but in the end it all comes together, as neatly and messily as fantasy ever does.

It's a beautiful piece of work, and it perfectly encapsulates the humor, stubbornness, stupidity, brilliance, cruelties and kindnesses of mankind -- amplified by the choirs of angels and demons, so ready to make war around them in God's name.
more
I like both Pratchett and Gaiman a lot. The combination didn't do much for me. It seemed too self-conscious, not to mention that they were trying too hard. Arch and amusing, yes. Hilarious, no, or at least not to my eye. My favorite part was when Death showed up and he was straight out of Discworld. The whole was chaotic and, oh, I dunno, unformed? Incompletely polished? It didn't work for me in the exact same way that Christopher Moore doesn't work for me.more
Everything you could hope for from a Pratchett/Gaiman joint about the End of Days.more
"famine, war, and pestilence were sucking off their cigarettes
death was just watching, getting off on all the coughing."

This book reminded me of that song. The end of the world, Satan's child, good v./& evil, &c. Funny (clever-funny, mostly) and the story was quite enjoyable, although the characters were too numerous to really care about any of them.more
This was a hoot!

I thoroughly enjoyed this hilarious satire of Armageddon. The AntiChrist as an eleven-year-old boy with a Hellhound masquerading as a rat terrier mongrel. The Four Bikers of the Apocalypse easy riding to the End of the World. And it all started with the Serpent and the guardian Angel from the Garden of Eden. To top it all off, a 17th century witch named Agnes Nutter accurately predicted everything.more
Listened to from September 20 to October 03, 2012Audio Review - I have the same feelings about the audio as I did when reading the book. I really enjoyed it until about two-thirds of the way through and then I lost interest. Still not sure why, but it is what it is. The first two-thirds I REALLY liked though!more
THIS. By the obvious evidence of my rating this five stars and putting it on my “Books Which Are Awesome” shelf, it’s evident that I REALLY LOVE THIS BOOK. (This is actually the first book I read by Pratchett and/or Gaiman in the first place, too.) That, and the fact that I have two copies and plan to get a third to replace one of the two.

The thing about this is that while you’re laughing hysterically or getting wigged out by some of the demons (specifically the maggots; thank you Neil Gaiman), it does have a lot to say. It doesn’t so much condemn religion, but rather looks at the human ideals of good and evil in a greatly different way from a lot of other books. I like that neither Heaven or Hell is presented as wholly wrong nor right, just the two sides of the same coin.

Aziraphale and Crowley have one of the best relationships I’ve read in fiction. Yes, it’s very easy to go and say that they’re an old married couple, but you get the sense in the beginning that they were genuinely good friends who happened to end up on different ideologies. They’re willing to work with each other, even if their end goals are on completely different ends of the spectrum. I also like that they’re not omnipotent—they’ve lived on Earth for millennia but they can still cock up. Massively. The Them do play into a little of stereotype of kid gangs, but I generally liked them. There’s a lot more to Adam’s development that I could have used, but I like that we don’t know everything about his childhood. Adds more to his eventual decision. Anathema does fall into the lines of something like Discworld’s Lancre Witches, but she’s a strong enough character in her own right. My one tiny nitpick of the book is that I really don’t like her relationship with Newt. I like them both as individual characters, and I can see them being attracted to each other…but I don’t like the whole “Oh, well, now we have to sleep with each other because Agnes said so!” Or rather, that Newt and Anathema know about this BEFORE they commit said act. It’s a very quick and somewhat cheap way to progress their relationship, and would have probably been better if they developed their attraction more naturally. (That said though, Agnes Nutter is a BAMF.)

I liked the lampshading of general Apocalyptic plotlines, particularly with the intended Antichrist supposed to go to an American diplomat, and the portrayal of the Four Horsepeople while they’re waiting around for the end to come. (And in Famine’s case, if his ways to keep himself amused may just scare you off of processed food forever.) I love the scenes where you see the effects of Adam’s powers worldwide—while they feel more like isolated incidents, it does give a larger scope of what he’s doing. Also the references and shout-outs are tastefully handled—obvious enough to get the joke, but neither writer beats it into the reader’s skull. (For example, I’ve read this book a number of times. Only this last time do I spot the Doctor Who cameo.)

Being a huge fan of both Gaiman and Pratchett, their writing really compliments the other. The casual observer may think that it wouldn’t work given the kind of books they respectively write, but there’s a similar sense of humor and use of language that both authors use and it works brilliantly. The use of footnotes aside, there’s no large passages that scream “NEIL/TERRY WROTE THIS!” (aside from the ones that the authors have said they had a stronger hand in developing). Which is fantastic—I haven’t run across It often, but I love it when a cowritten book flows just so seamlessly that it feels more like a book rather than “You got your Gaiman in my Pratchett!” etc.

It’s an engaging funny book that still manages to hold up even after repeated readings. Like I mentioned above, I’ve read this hundreds of times, and yet I’m still finding jokes and references and plot devices each time. There’s a reason why I need extra copies, it’s one of those books I want to go to everyone I know and say “You HAVE to read this.”
more
This is a hilarious book that combines the (as I call it) "strangist" genius of Neil Gaiman with the sardonic and sometimes silly humor of Terry Pratchett. It's Armageddon, the end of the world, but with a twist. There are actually wacky hijinks and hilarious misunderstandings. I think what I really like is that various chapters come at you from one character's perception or another (while maintaining omniscience) and what we know that they don't is most of what makes it funny. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and could go on forever, but I'll just say that if you ever thought that heaven and hell were cut and dry, read this. It may be funny and tell a story, but it also takes a look at some deeper emotions as well.more
Rather predictable humor and puns... but fun, nevertheless. A few real laugh out loud moments that make it worth a weekend of reading, like when a character manages to trap another character's essence on an answering machine tape. He then considers tossing it onto the floor of a car he is certain eventually morphs every lost tape into "The Best of Queen"... but decides that is too cruel of a punishment, even for this villain...more
This book was absolutely excellent. Here is my review.

There is a reason this book almost became a movie (and I really wish it had.) It’s unlike anything I’ve ever read before. I admit, there were moments I didn’t appreciate at first. For example, our main character Crowley Aziraphale are the biggest characters and the story always returns to them, but in about 150 pages they disappear from a very long time. Instead, different main characters come into the story and take center. The Thems, Anathema Device, Newt Pulsifer, Sergeant Shadwell, etc. Some characters were also given full pages, when their part was very minor, and could have been cut altogether.
However, as we begin to get to the meat of Armageddon we have begun to get to know these new characters and sense what each role is. Then as if it couldn’t get better, Crowley and Aziraphale come back into the picture.
The ending to a book is so important and even though the middle made me want to slow down my reading, the ending all but made up for it. Expect to see immortals that you’ve heard of before, and some you haven’t. Even the ending, I can’t say for sure but the way a voice came from out of nowhere and disrupted the conversation? I think a very high supreme being was actually there.
The ending with the Antichrist as well, for the last bit? Worth it. Every bit, you couldn’t have asked for a better ending.
more
I have no idea where my original copy got to, but I was thrilled to snag another one and reread it. I love Terry Pratchett, I love Neil Gaiman, and I just adore the sort of madcap British humor that made Douglas Adams so memorable and makes Good Omens just about perfect.more
Another really funny book that I loved. I'd like more of this somehow - sequels, a movie, anything.more
Didn't find it laugh-out-loud funny, but still funny nevertheless. Clever references. Footnotes were sometimes the best part.more
The audiobook version is wonderfully read by British actor Martin Jarvis. Because Jarvis gives each character a unique voice, the story is even more amusing and enjoyable than reading it would be.more
Good Omens, by Gaiman and Pratchett, is a unique, comical take on the coming Apocalypse. The book begins “in the beginning”, in the Garden of Eden, with one angel, Aziraphale, and one demon, Crowley. The two become friends of sorts throughout the ages and even hang out together in the present day. The book delves into their stories while also examining the narratives of several other important people during the final days before the world ends, including the Antichrist. Aziraphale and Crowley both decide that they like Earth very much, thank you, and begin to work together to bring down the Antichrist and avert Armageddon. Unfortunately, as all good plans go, their plans do not go as they would have hoped because someone has misplaced the Antichrist. In the final days before the end of life as everyone knows it, one angel and one demon work together to keep things the same.The book is written in a comical manner with casual hysterical comments tucked into the narrative. Good Omens also has hilarious footnotes explaining various parts of the book, often to Americans “and other city-dwelling life-forms.” It is fairly fast-paced and is told from several different perspectives, which are a little challenging to keep straight in the beginning of the book before one is used to the characters. Overall, this is a one of a kind, laugh-out-loud-type of book that anyone with a sense of humor would enjoy. I strongly recommend this as one of the best books I have read in a long time!Cindy B.more
We had mixed ratings with some of really liking this book and others of us disliking it. We did have some good discussion on the complexity of good and evil and the overlapping borders. We wished we understood British humor a bit more and felt that we missed a lot of the symbolism and tongue-in-cheek humor.more
Laugh out loud funny in almost every chapter. I love Neil Gaiman's novels. My favorite is still American Gods but he certainly out did himself with this little bit of fiction. Delightfully confused characters that make everyone question what really is good and evil. A must read if you are a Neil Gaiman fan or just an end of the world apocalyptic fan.more
A fun and clever novel. It had a very creative premise and was quite funny at times. Has much of the satiric style typical to a Terry Pratchett novel with the added twist of creativity of Neil Gaimen. If you like reading these authors you would definitely enjoy this book.more
Love Neil Gaiman, love Terry Pratchett, love this collaboration most of all. The combination of Pratchett's wittily observed humour and Gaiman's sometimes dark outlook on life is hilarious, and yet this book does have an underlying message. Crowley and Aziraphale are most amusing - I like to think Aziraphale is modelled more after Pratchett, and Crowley more after Gaiman - provide great amusement. 'Oh do come on, angel' is a great line. I have read everything either have in print, and though there are books by both I love - Jingo, American Gods, Stardust, Witches Abroad - this is the one I love best. And though I could never pick a favourite book, this would surely rank in the top five.more
The AntiChrist is mistakenly placed in an ordinary British household, and angels, demons, witches, witch-hunters and the four motorcyclists of the apocalypse all race toward the end of days.This book had me at "Could you tell me your planet's albedo, sir?" on page 187. I was enjoying the whole thing immensely, but that's when the book crossed into "will treasure forever and ever" territory.more
Starting in 2001, my husband has given me books for Christmas. It began with him looking up lists of the year's best books on Salon.com and buying me five or so to wrap in our local free newspaper and put under the four-foot-tall artificial tree I bought in 1999.

In 2003, after we'd moved to California, which cut our income in half and doubled our rent, he stopped buying books and instead began putting library books under the tree along with a promise of uninterrupted time in which to read them. By 2005, our first Christmas with our first child, the time had become an even more valuable commodity than the money.

In 2008, he stopped using reviews of books to choose which to put under the tree for me and started using my own Goodreads to-read list. That is just what he did this year, which means that one of the books I found under our now thirteen-year-old tree was Good Omens. Okay, well, technically I picked the books up from the library myself, wondering why my husband was reading a bunch of books I'd had on my to-read list for ages, but the effect was largely the same. I brought them home, we stuck them (unwrapped) under the tree, and I didn't think about them until Christmas morning.

Good Omens is the first of the bunch I picked up this Christmas break. I read it in three installments, one while my husband took my son to the library and I sat with my pale and vomity daughter, one after everyone else was in bed and the snow fell silently outside the window behind me, and the third this morning while my husband took our well-for-the-moment children to the children's museum.

I found the experience of immersing myself in this book very pleasant. I've been doing a slog through my "currently-reading" list lately and nonfiction just doesn't invite the kind of immersion that a novel does. In addition, I was impressed with the seamless way Pratchett and Gaimen assembled this co-authoring effort, wondering at times if their little jabs at trends in co-parenting might be self-conscious references to their own co-fathering of this book.

Overall, the book has the dry, British wit of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and a decidedly Gaiman-esque flavor especially to the Four Horsemen bits, or at least an American Gods-esque flavor, although I found it less laugh-out-loud funny than the Hitchhiker's trilogy and less well developed than American Gods. Neither of these comparisons is actually fair, though. Gaiman published American Gods fifteen years after Good Omens came out, and one would assume that an author's work would acquire some polish with fifteen years of practice, and I first read Douglas Adams in middle school when I was determined to find anything British hilarious because it seemed esoteric and therefore made me feel special when I laughed at it even if I didn't catch 75% of the jokes. It's possible that, had I picked up Good Omens in middle school (which would have been impossible since it came out the year I started high school), I would have laughed out loud at it. But I'm a jaded 36-year-old who picks up her own Christmas gifts from the library and looks at her child having a stomach bug as "downtime." I think it takes a little more to make me laugh out loud these days.

But I did find Good Omens amusing, and I'm glad I picked it from the Christmas pile first. Now for some lunch, some exercise, and on to the next book.

more
I thought this was hilarious. I do wish I had been to London or was more of an anglophile so I would understand 100% of the jokes rather than... what... maybe 90ish percent? Pratchett and Gaiman definitely did a great job and it was impossible to tell which author was writing which part. I felt it got a little bit long in parts and maybe they stuck in a few too many jokes just for the heck of it (which didn't add to the story whatsoever), but overall I really enjoyed it.more
This is a seriously funny book about the end of the world. Its themes include gentle and not so gentle satire of various religious groups, as well as some serious thinking on the nature of man and the universe. The plot,which revolves around Armageddon, also serves as a vehicle for puns, slapstick, and jokes. Jointly written by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman,the book captures the best qualities of both authors.more
The time has finally come. Now is the time of the end of the world and the final show-off between good and evil. Except things do not quite work out as planned this time lead to many embarrassing and hilarious situations.more
Far too often, my second time reading a book turns into a hunt for the book's flaws, which I must surely have missed the first time through. That was the case with this book, but I came away mostly satisfied.

I say mostly, because (and I realize this is kind of a complaint for the sake of complaining) Good Omens felt just a little too silly for me. Yes, I know that's kind of the point of the book, but I found myself resenting a lot of the asides and footnotes and just the general goofiness of the book. If I had my druthers, someone would have sat down and cut out some of the extra business, but then again, there are reasons that I should never get my hands on my druthers.

It's a fun, irreverent book, all the same. I just think that the overly complicated plot and the excess of characters can get in the way of the fun from time to time.more
Load more
scribd