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They are Microserfs—six code-crunching computer whizzes who spend upward of sixteen hours a day "coding" and eating "flat" foods (food which, like Kraft singles, can be passed underneath closed doors) as they fearfully scan company e-mail to learn whether the great Bill is going to "flame" one of them. But now there's a chance to become innovators instead of cogs in the gargantuan Microsoft machine. The intrepid Microserfs are striking out on their own—living together in a shared digital flophouse as they desperately try to cultivate well-rounded lives and find love amid the dislocated, subhuman whir and buzz of their computer-driven world.

Published: HarperCollins on Jun 21, 2011
ISBN: 9780062105967
List price: $10.99
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I enjoyed this much more that I thought I would. Surprisingly relevant to me, although I was a child and not a coder during the 90's. Lots of self-reinvention. More poignant than I expected. The ending felt a little tacked on (but 90% of endings feel this way to me), but otherwise I liked this a lot.read more
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I was expecting this to be pure satire, but it is actually quite a serious novel, trying to go beyond the stereotype of the "geek" and look at the emotional lives of the people who worked in American software companies in the 1990s. Obviously, any novel that takes up with concepts like "information superhighway" is going to look quaintly old-fashioned 15 years later. That distancing effect is enhanced for non-American readers by the flood of cultural references to American food products and TV shows we've only vaguely heard of. Coupland's computer-geeks turn out, slightly disappointingly, to be rather normal young people who find themselves confronted with the usual hazards of growing up: deciding what to wear, finding a partner, dealing with parents, finding somewhere to live, coping with illness, etc. If they are changing the world, then they are doing it in a somewhat absurd and peripheral way (developing a computer game involving Lego blocks). So, in the end, it turns out to be just a perfectly normal Bildungsroman with a bit of fancy computer language thrown in to make it look experimental.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Well... not so great. If you REALLY like reading blogs you'll like the style of this book. It is written in a diary format. It was written in '95 time frame so blogs weren't what they are today. Nothing too deep and only mildy amusing in parts. I picked it up for $2 at the library so if any wants it let me know. =)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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I enjoyed this much more that I thought I would. Surprisingly relevant to me, although I was a child and not a coder during the 90's. Lots of self-reinvention. More poignant than I expected. The ending felt a little tacked on (but 90% of endings feel this way to me), but otherwise I liked this a lot.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I was expecting this to be pure satire, but it is actually quite a serious novel, trying to go beyond the stereotype of the "geek" and look at the emotional lives of the people who worked in American software companies in the 1990s. Obviously, any novel that takes up with concepts like "information superhighway" is going to look quaintly old-fashioned 15 years later. That distancing effect is enhanced for non-American readers by the flood of cultural references to American food products and TV shows we've only vaguely heard of. Coupland's computer-geeks turn out, slightly disappointingly, to be rather normal young people who find themselves confronted with the usual hazards of growing up: deciding what to wear, finding a partner, dealing with parents, finding somewhere to live, coping with illness, etc. If they are changing the world, then they are doing it in a somewhat absurd and peripheral way (developing a computer game involving Lego blocks). So, in the end, it turns out to be just a perfectly normal Bildungsroman with a bit of fancy computer language thrown in to make it look experimental.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Well... not so great. If you REALLY like reading blogs you'll like the style of this book. It is written in a diary format. It was written in '95 time frame so blogs weren't what they are today. Nothing too deep and only mildy amusing in parts. I picked it up for $2 at the library so if any wants it let me know. =)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I love this book. I worked in computing for some years and have friends who do so still, and this crazy world is not so far from reality. One of the few books I can read several times with enjoyment.
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One of my fave Coupland books. Entertaining from beginning to end.
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I'm not sure what I expected, but it's very disjointed and random... even more so than JPod, which I enjoyed far more.I never felt any connection with the characters - despite living and working through the era the book talks about. It's a shame.
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