This title is not available in our membership service

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible.

Request Title

A classic tale of sensuous secrets and unanticipated passion,from the extraordinary New York Times bestselling author

The toast of the town ...

All London is at Julia Wentworth's feet—and anything she desires is hers for the asking. But the glamorous leading lady guards a shocking secret: a mystery husband whom she does not know, dares not mention ... and cannot love.

For years Damon Savage has been searching for the stranger his parents wed him to without his consent, hoping to legally free himself from matrimony's invisible chains. And he is astonished to discover his "bride" is none other than the exquisite lady he'd hoped to make his mistress! But though his wife by law, Julia will never truly be Damon's—until he conquers her fears, his formidable rivals ... and her proud, passionate, and independent heart.

Topics: Arranged Marriage, England, London, Regency Era, Steamy, Secrets, and Acting

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061752490
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Somewhere I'll Find You
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
the lead male was possessive and domineering to the point that it should be considered abuse and the only reason the lead female seems to go along with it is because she is also stubborn and the sex it good.

after he kidnapped her with the intent to "ruin" her and said it wouldn't be rape because he would make her want it, I was totally turned off.more
Characters not as developed as they could have been but still a good story. more
Rose Cottage is another of Mary Stewart's quiet, easy love stories with a bit of mystery. No high drama here -- not even as much as in, say, Stormy Petrel. I should perhaps call it a mystery rather than a romance, since the romance elements are slow and in the background to the mystery. Mostly, though, it's just a story of the protagonist figuring herself out and coming to terms with the small secrets of families, and of reunions, and coming home.

And, if it matters to anyone else, there's no cousin-marrying here.more
A sort-of mystery, in a very gentle way. Not at all like her Gothic stories, but much more easy to deal with just before bed. I wasn’t particularly struck by it in any way, but did like reading it. (Dec 2011)more
Ugh. Had to force myself to finish this one, and I'm not even sure why I did, except that then it'd be over with. Absolutely nothing that the characters did or said made any sense to me in the end. I've really enjoyed many of Kleypas's later books, but this one just did nothing for me.more
In "Somewhere I'll Find You" Kleypas cuts down on thrills and focuses on carefully setting up the advance-and-retreat of the romance between Julia and Damon.

In fact, she does such a good job of it that she doesn't have to fall back on the premise from which the novel begins: that Julia and Damon are already married. Rather than using that hook to lasso them together, by the time Julia and Damon recognize one another as husband and wife their relationship continues to develop with a momentum of its own.

Julia is wonderful and vivacious. Damon was not a very well-defined hero, in my opinion; a little wooden. I never felt like I knew him well or understood him thoroughly. This is problematic because Kleypas devotes quite a bit of space in this novel to setting up the sequel, and the character of its hero Logan Scott is compelling and believable in a way that Damon isn't.

Still, this is a better-than-average Kleypas, and Kleypas is always a cut above the rest in romance. It's worth a read.more
A pleasant read with a slight mystery. I enjoyed the setting of late-forties rural England more, perhaps, than the story itself, but that is not really a criticism. Certainly not as plotty or suspenseful as others of Stewart's, but an afternoon's visit to an appealing time gone by with just enough goings on to keep one going on.more
Kathy Herrick's mother had left her when she was a little girl and gone off with the gypsies. Thinking that her mother is now dead, Kathy has returned to her childhood home - Rose Cottage - to claim it for her own. I liked this story very much and give it a C+!more
Lovely. A little romance, a little mystery - the Mary Stewart patented kind, with lots of maybe-nastiness that dissolves away into happiness at the end. The final convention in the cottage is laugh-out-loud funny, starting with the bit about Bunny. The setting is fascinating, too - 1948 and still under rationing, and the similarities and differences between Scottish Strathbeg, English Todhall, and London. A highly enjoyable story.more
I unfortunately read this one after Because You're Mine, the second in the series, but I enjoyed it all the same. I LOVE these books involving London’s theatre scene in the nineteenth century. It seems the general consensus is Lisa Kleypas’ later books are better – I won’t argue either way – but for me, anything involving the theatre is going to capture my interest. This book has an original idea in that the heroine struggles with the fact she’ll have to give up her career for marriage – not exactly standard historical romance fare! Julia Hargate and Damon Savage were forced into marriage as young children, and some years later Julia is disowned by her family when she runs away to London and becomes a famous actress – under a new name. Damon has been searching for his wife for years, with the intention of dissolving the marriage. When he is introduced to her as a potential patron for the theatre, they fall in love. It looks as though Julia will be forced to choose between her career and her marriage. Some reviewers have expressed dislike at Julia’s indecision, but that is what makes the story so good. I’m glad this heroine had something in her life beyond balls and fancy outfits, and I suppose it was the break from tradition that upset some. I adore books set in a theatre environment, and Lisa Kleypas really paints a realistic picture of the theatre world and the passion that comes with it. This is one of the most fascinating facets of London, and I only wish there were more books to the series. The story also takes us to beautiful Bath, which was another aspect of the story I really enjoyed. The relationship is wonderful – not only is the ‘big reveal’ brought out early enough for the characters to deal with their issues, but both Damon and Julia face the fact they are in love with each other quite early on. It is straight-laced Damon’s struggle with social conventions, and Julia’s passion for life that causes the conflict between them. As with the other Capital Theatre book, I love that we get to meet such a cross-section of London society in this book. This is a city functioning on all levels, not just a group of pretty little virgins lining themselves up at a ball. It really brings the story to life. The Capital Theatre books have been really great reads for me. The combination of the theatre, the characters, the conflicts and the romance is wonderful. I’d definitely recommend them.more
Having recently moved, some old favorite authors came to my attention while moving boxes. My husband kept getting irritated with me when I would get distracted by the books, pulling them out and making stacks of “to be read” books instead of putting the books away. Unfortunately, my desire to read is always greater than my free time so the stacks will quickly get out of control unless I am reminded that I own the books and just have to pull them out when I want to read them. I decided to read Mary Stewart’s Rose Cottage. Mary Stewart has been a favorite for years because I love her Arthurian series but I don’t remember reading anything else by her.The novel is set in England in 1947 (I debated about tagging it as historical but to me historical feels at least 100 years old so I didn’t), right after the end of World War II. I have read numerous books, both fiction and nonfiction, that take place during WWII but this is the first that takes place in post WWII England.The story is a great one about family, community and the mistakes that can greatly impact our lives. I really like the main character, Kathy’s attitude. Instead of whining about the sad events in her life, she just quietly moves forward making the best of things. It reminds me that no matter how tough things are, you can always be happy.The story was a little slower moving than most other books but I actually enjoyed the pace as a change to the normal. It is a quick read and most of the plot revolves around the main characters search for answers about her past but there is some romance woven within the story.more
Reading is always a gentle pleasure when Mary Stewart is involved. Rose Cottage was mystery that moved/unfolded at a perfect pace. Nothing too crazy or disturbing... just a fun read. I found it relaxing during a stressful week. It reinforced my love for this author.more
This is not one of Kleypas's best books, although it is still completely readable. While the main characters are good enough - although maybe not entirely interesting - I found myself interested more by Logan Scott - who to me was a far more interesting character than Damon. Kleypas does a lot more "telling" than "showing" - which I see as a fault - and I think she has Julia give in to Damon too quickly. It seems that one moment she's convinced she can't marry him, and then switches her opinion in an instant. I would have liked to see that better developed. Still, all in all, not a bad read.more
Read all 14 reviews

Reviews

the lead male was possessive and domineering to the point that it should be considered abuse and the only reason the lead female seems to go along with it is because she is also stubborn and the sex it good.

after he kidnapped her with the intent to "ruin" her and said it wouldn't be rape because he would make her want it, I was totally turned off.more
Characters not as developed as they could have been but still a good story. more
Rose Cottage is another of Mary Stewart's quiet, easy love stories with a bit of mystery. No high drama here -- not even as much as in, say, Stormy Petrel. I should perhaps call it a mystery rather than a romance, since the romance elements are slow and in the background to the mystery. Mostly, though, it's just a story of the protagonist figuring herself out and coming to terms with the small secrets of families, and of reunions, and coming home.

And, if it matters to anyone else, there's no cousin-marrying here.more
A sort-of mystery, in a very gentle way. Not at all like her Gothic stories, but much more easy to deal with just before bed. I wasn’t particularly struck by it in any way, but did like reading it. (Dec 2011)more
Ugh. Had to force myself to finish this one, and I'm not even sure why I did, except that then it'd be over with. Absolutely nothing that the characters did or said made any sense to me in the end. I've really enjoyed many of Kleypas's later books, but this one just did nothing for me.more
In "Somewhere I'll Find You" Kleypas cuts down on thrills and focuses on carefully setting up the advance-and-retreat of the romance between Julia and Damon.

In fact, she does such a good job of it that she doesn't have to fall back on the premise from which the novel begins: that Julia and Damon are already married. Rather than using that hook to lasso them together, by the time Julia and Damon recognize one another as husband and wife their relationship continues to develop with a momentum of its own.

Julia is wonderful and vivacious. Damon was not a very well-defined hero, in my opinion; a little wooden. I never felt like I knew him well or understood him thoroughly. This is problematic because Kleypas devotes quite a bit of space in this novel to setting up the sequel, and the character of its hero Logan Scott is compelling and believable in a way that Damon isn't.

Still, this is a better-than-average Kleypas, and Kleypas is always a cut above the rest in romance. It's worth a read.more
A pleasant read with a slight mystery. I enjoyed the setting of late-forties rural England more, perhaps, than the story itself, but that is not really a criticism. Certainly not as plotty or suspenseful as others of Stewart's, but an afternoon's visit to an appealing time gone by with just enough goings on to keep one going on.more
Kathy Herrick's mother had left her when she was a little girl and gone off with the gypsies. Thinking that her mother is now dead, Kathy has returned to her childhood home - Rose Cottage - to claim it for her own. I liked this story very much and give it a C+!more
Lovely. A little romance, a little mystery - the Mary Stewart patented kind, with lots of maybe-nastiness that dissolves away into happiness at the end. The final convention in the cottage is laugh-out-loud funny, starting with the bit about Bunny. The setting is fascinating, too - 1948 and still under rationing, and the similarities and differences between Scottish Strathbeg, English Todhall, and London. A highly enjoyable story.more
I unfortunately read this one after Because You're Mine, the second in the series, but I enjoyed it all the same. I LOVE these books involving London’s theatre scene in the nineteenth century. It seems the general consensus is Lisa Kleypas’ later books are better – I won’t argue either way – but for me, anything involving the theatre is going to capture my interest. This book has an original idea in that the heroine struggles with the fact she’ll have to give up her career for marriage – not exactly standard historical romance fare! Julia Hargate and Damon Savage were forced into marriage as young children, and some years later Julia is disowned by her family when she runs away to London and becomes a famous actress – under a new name. Damon has been searching for his wife for years, with the intention of dissolving the marriage. When he is introduced to her as a potential patron for the theatre, they fall in love. It looks as though Julia will be forced to choose between her career and her marriage. Some reviewers have expressed dislike at Julia’s indecision, but that is what makes the story so good. I’m glad this heroine had something in her life beyond balls and fancy outfits, and I suppose it was the break from tradition that upset some. I adore books set in a theatre environment, and Lisa Kleypas really paints a realistic picture of the theatre world and the passion that comes with it. This is one of the most fascinating facets of London, and I only wish there were more books to the series. The story also takes us to beautiful Bath, which was another aspect of the story I really enjoyed. The relationship is wonderful – not only is the ‘big reveal’ brought out early enough for the characters to deal with their issues, but both Damon and Julia face the fact they are in love with each other quite early on. It is straight-laced Damon’s struggle with social conventions, and Julia’s passion for life that causes the conflict between them. As with the other Capital Theatre book, I love that we get to meet such a cross-section of London society in this book. This is a city functioning on all levels, not just a group of pretty little virgins lining themselves up at a ball. It really brings the story to life. The Capital Theatre books have been really great reads for me. The combination of the theatre, the characters, the conflicts and the romance is wonderful. I’d definitely recommend them.more
Having recently moved, some old favorite authors came to my attention while moving boxes. My husband kept getting irritated with me when I would get distracted by the books, pulling them out and making stacks of “to be read” books instead of putting the books away. Unfortunately, my desire to read is always greater than my free time so the stacks will quickly get out of control unless I am reminded that I own the books and just have to pull them out when I want to read them. I decided to read Mary Stewart’s Rose Cottage. Mary Stewart has been a favorite for years because I love her Arthurian series but I don’t remember reading anything else by her.The novel is set in England in 1947 (I debated about tagging it as historical but to me historical feels at least 100 years old so I didn’t), right after the end of World War II. I have read numerous books, both fiction and nonfiction, that take place during WWII but this is the first that takes place in post WWII England.The story is a great one about family, community and the mistakes that can greatly impact our lives. I really like the main character, Kathy’s attitude. Instead of whining about the sad events in her life, she just quietly moves forward making the best of things. It reminds me that no matter how tough things are, you can always be happy.The story was a little slower moving than most other books but I actually enjoyed the pace as a change to the normal. It is a quick read and most of the plot revolves around the main characters search for answers about her past but there is some romance woven within the story.more
Reading is always a gentle pleasure when Mary Stewart is involved. Rose Cottage was mystery that moved/unfolded at a perfect pace. Nothing too crazy or disturbing... just a fun read. I found it relaxing during a stressful week. It reinforced my love for this author.more
This is not one of Kleypas's best books, although it is still completely readable. While the main characters are good enough - although maybe not entirely interesting - I found myself interested more by Logan Scott - who to me was a far more interesting character than Damon. Kleypas does a lot more "telling" than "showing" - which I see as a fault - and I think she has Julia give in to Damon too quickly. It seems that one moment she's convinced she can't marry him, and then switches her opinion in an instant. I would have liked to see that better developed. Still, all in all, not a bad read.more
Load more
scribd