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Of especially naughty children it is sometimes said, "They must have been raised by wolves."

The Incorrigible children actually were.

Thanks to the efforts of Miss Penelope Lumley, their plucky governess, Alexander, Beowulf, and Cassiopeia are much more like children than wolf pups now. They are accustomed to wearing clothes. They hardly ever howl at the moon. And for the most part, they resist the urge to chase squirrels up trees.

Despite Penelope's civilizing influence, the Incorrigibles still managed to ruin Lady Constance's Christmas ball, nearly destroying the grand house. So while Ashton Place is being restored, Penelope, the Ashtons, and the children take up residence in London. Penelope is thrilled, as London offers so many opportunities to further the education of her unique students. But the city presents challenges, too, in the form of the palace guards' bearskin hats, which drive the children wild—not to mention the abundance of pigeons the Incorrigibles love to hunt. As they explore London, however, they discover more about themselves as clues about the children's—and Penelope's—mysterious past crop up in the most unexpected ways. . . .

Published: HarperCollins on Feb 22, 2011
ISBN: 9780062069719
List price: $5.99
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So I like Wood's writing. It is very Lemony Snickett. But...I wonder about the appeal. I enjoy the humorous references and winks to the time period but I wonder how much kids will pick up on this. Which is why I gave it a tween and ya. But still a fun book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The worst part about this book was that it was compared to Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. Comparing one book to another, arguably, more popular book, or series, or author, or what have you is very dangerous, as it causes the astute reader to view the work at hand through a more critical lens usually reserved for books and series and authors who have proven their worth enough to get there.This gave me a terrible first impression of the book, as I've read other books in the past that have been likened to other, more popular books, series, and authors, some even to the point of declaring themselves superior, only to be let down.So, what can I say about the author, Maryrose Wood, and her ability to overcome these publisher-laden handicaps?One word: Wow.Now other words: Wood has crafted here an atypical governess story, clearly inspired by the Victorian-era chick-lit, but also with a healthy dose of modern-day humor, and a bit of the hair of the dog that bit ya.The premise of the series as a whole, The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, is that some feral foundlings, the eponymous children who are dubbed with the surname Incorrigible are put under the charge of a governess named Penelope who has more pluck than anything else. By the end of the first volume, she's managed to convince them to sit up straight, use utensils, and stop eating most woodland creatures. Nevertheless, their surrogate lupine parentage comes through at the most inopportune times.In the second volume, the one I'm reviewing, the Ashtons, their servants, the Incorrigibles, and Penelope all go to London, where many mysteries are reveled, some are only slightly uncovered, and many, many more are introduced.While Maryrose Wood is not exactly Lemony Snicket, she is Maryrose Wood, and that should be enough.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the sequel to The Mysterious Howling, which I loved when I read it last year. I didn't think The Hidden Gallery reached quite the same level as the first, but it's still an entertaining book and the series as a whole is one that I'd wholeheartedly recommend. I just found this installment a bit frustrating because for about the first two-thirds of the book, no progress at all was made towards resolving the various mysteries that had been introduced in the first one, and even when certain pieces of information were revealed toward the end, we were often left with more questions than answers. One the one hand, this is a good thing because it means that the series can go on longer, and I do enjoy reading about these characters. On the other hand, I'd like the main plot lines to progress at least a bit more in 300+ pages. Maryrose Wood can certainly write a tantalizing story, but in the end it felt like we hadn't gotten very far. Still, Wood remains one of my favourite new authors, and I'm eager to see how the story unfolds in the coming books.read more
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Reviews

So I like Wood's writing. It is very Lemony Snickett. But...I wonder about the appeal. I enjoy the humorous references and winks to the time period but I wonder how much kids will pick up on this. Which is why I gave it a tween and ya. But still a fun book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The worst part about this book was that it was compared to Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. Comparing one book to another, arguably, more popular book, or series, or author, or what have you is very dangerous, as it causes the astute reader to view the work at hand through a more critical lens usually reserved for books and series and authors who have proven their worth enough to get there.This gave me a terrible first impression of the book, as I've read other books in the past that have been likened to other, more popular books, series, and authors, some even to the point of declaring themselves superior, only to be let down.So, what can I say about the author, Maryrose Wood, and her ability to overcome these publisher-laden handicaps?One word: Wow.Now other words: Wood has crafted here an atypical governess story, clearly inspired by the Victorian-era chick-lit, but also with a healthy dose of modern-day humor, and a bit of the hair of the dog that bit ya.The premise of the series as a whole, The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, is that some feral foundlings, the eponymous children who are dubbed with the surname Incorrigible are put under the charge of a governess named Penelope who has more pluck than anything else. By the end of the first volume, she's managed to convince them to sit up straight, use utensils, and stop eating most woodland creatures. Nevertheless, their surrogate lupine parentage comes through at the most inopportune times.In the second volume, the one I'm reviewing, the Ashtons, their servants, the Incorrigibles, and Penelope all go to London, where many mysteries are reveled, some are only slightly uncovered, and many, many more are introduced.While Maryrose Wood is not exactly Lemony Snicket, she is Maryrose Wood, and that should be enough.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the sequel to The Mysterious Howling, which I loved when I read it last year. I didn't think The Hidden Gallery reached quite the same level as the first, but it's still an entertaining book and the series as a whole is one that I'd wholeheartedly recommend. I just found this installment a bit frustrating because for about the first two-thirds of the book, no progress at all was made towards resolving the various mysteries that had been introduced in the first one, and even when certain pieces of information were revealed toward the end, we were often left with more questions than answers. One the one hand, this is a good thing because it means that the series can go on longer, and I do enjoy reading about these characters. On the other hand, I'd like the main plot lines to progress at least a bit more in 300+ pages. Maryrose Wood can certainly write a tantalizing story, but in the end it felt like we hadn't gotten very far. Still, Wood remains one of my favourite new authors, and I'm eager to see how the story unfolds in the coming books.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"Ahwoooooooooooo!"As Agatha Swanburn says, "She who waits for the perfect moment to act will never make a turn at a busy intersection." And so we are delighted by this and other revelations of a Victorian lady as related by her student Penelope. I haven't read the first book but I intend to now. I was afraid this boook might just be fluff. However, as I got more into the book I really enjoyed the developing mystery surrounding this family.My only fear is that it will start leaning to the supernatural which I would not enjoy...we'll see. But so far the Incorrigible Children have been wonderwooooo!!!!
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The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Wood is the second book in the Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place series. The first book in the series is currently a YRCA selection for 2013. The book picks up right where the first left off, with the mess of the ball still on everyone's mind. The heroine, Miss Penelope Lumley, decides it might be a good idea to take the children to London for a trip to clear their heads and get away from Ashton Place for awhile. She also wishes to visit with the headmistress of her former school whom she formed a close relationship with. When she asks Lady Constance, the wife of Lord Ashton, she agrees immediately, but to Penelope's dismay she decides to come along as well. When they arrive in London, things immediately begin to get mysterious again. Penelope receives a strange guidebook from her former headmistress and an old gypsy in the street yells some rather cryptic words at the children. Then, when Penelope finally meets with Miss Mortimer, her former headmistress she also gives her a rather mysterious warning regarding the moon and wolves. Through the rest of the book adventure and mystery ensue, including inebriated actors, questionable judges, and of course a hidden gallery. More questions arise about the origins of the children, of Lord Ashton, and even of Miss Penelope Lumley herself. We can only hope that some of these questions will be answered in the next book, The Unseen Guest. I enjoyed this book just as much as the first, once again for the humorous writing and the sense of mystery which permeated throughout. Jon Klassen's illustrations throughout helped to further the plot and provide some humorous asides. Maryrose Wood's writing is very strong again, particularly when she breaks from the plot to go of on humorous tangents. One such tangent that I particularly enjoyed is:"On the other hand , perhaps Mr. Burns was using his poetic license. This is the license that allows poets to say things that are not precisely true without being accused of telling lies. Anyone may obtain such a license, but still, the powers it grants must be wielded responsibly. (A word to the wise: When asked, "Who put the empty milk carton back in the refrigerator?" if you reply, "My incorrigible sister, Lavinia," when in fact it is you who are the guilty party, at the ensuing trial, the judge will not be impressed to hear you defend yourself by claiming that your whopper was merely "poetic license.")All in all, an enjoyable easy read that could be enjoyed by readers of almost any age.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Greatly enjoying this series; looking forward to reading the rest. I like how the clues to the series long mystery are slowly unveiled while the book-specific issues are resolved (at least mostly); paying attention is rewarded in the long run. I'm actually really looking forward to listening to this series on audio as well.
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