Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Influence, the classic book on persuasion, explains the psychology of why people say "yes"—and how to apply these understandings. Dr. Robert Cialdini is the seminal expert in the rapidly expanding field of influence and persuasion. His thirty-five years of rigorous, evidence-based research along with a three-year program of study on what moves people to change behavior has resulted in this highly acclaimed book.

You'll learn the six universal principles, how to use them to become a skilled persuader—and how to defend yourself against them. Perfect for people in all walks of life, the principles of Influence will move you toward profound personal change and act as a driving force for your success.

Some images that appeared in the print edition of this book are unavailable in the electronic edition due to rights reasons.

Topics: Communication, Leadership, and Cognitive Science

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061899874
List price: $12.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Influence
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
You're an individual, right? You have your own thoughts, your own opinion, right? Wrong.... Read this book, and you'll know why. An eye-opener about persuasion, business trick and generally about why we say yes when we don't even want...more
Author Cialdini began the research that would lead to this book when he got tired of being taken advantage of. He’s not unintelligent, yet he would find himself talked into buying things he didn’t want at all. What was happening? It turns out that there are some basic ways that humans are influenced, and most people follow them without questioning. Some are just the easy way to deal with situations, while some actually create discomfort when one refuses to follow the social conventions. Cialdini breaks it all down into six methods of getting people to do things the way the user wants them to: reciprocation- if someone does something for you, no matter how small, you must then do what they want you to do, hence all those charities that send you return address labels; commitment and consistency-if they can get you to establish yourself as something, say, someone who likes to go out to dinner by asking you about your habits in a survey, then ask you to buy a coupon book for dining out, you are more apt to buy the thing rather than risk the image built in the survey; social proof- if other people think a certain way, so should you- the canned laughter on sitcoms is the most common use of this; liking- this comes into play in ploys like Tupperware parties, where because the person benefiting is your friend you feel you *have* to buy something, it is brought into play by having the seller be someone attractive and dress like and have similar values to you; authority- 9 out of 10 doctors recommend this drug!; and scarcity- hurry, only 10 left! -or limited edition items. We’ve all seen these ploys; we’ve all fallen prey to them. The author gives a few suggestions as to how to prevent yourself from doing so in the future. Basically it comes down to being willing to break social rules, like the one of reciprocity. One must remember to think about every interaction where someone wants something from you, rather than running on auto pilot. It’s an interesting book. Not only does Cialdini have a lot of studies to back up his thesis, but he’s an entertaining writer.more
A good review of literature in easy to read format. A must for sales and marketing folks looking to dig deeper. However most of the research comes from college students in the USA so it may be more narrow than indicated. Great way to be on the lookout for manipulation as well.more
Been wanting to read something by Cialdini for a while, actually ever since I listened to one of his lectures - which was great. A day after I finished it, someone stopped us in the street selling timeshare. The commitment-consistency; contrast & reciprocity techniques were all there in the pitch (...and we didn't buy) [Sep-07:]more
Read all 18 reviews

Reviews

You're an individual, right? You have your own thoughts, your own opinion, right? Wrong.... Read this book, and you'll know why. An eye-opener about persuasion, business trick and generally about why we say yes when we don't even want...more
Author Cialdini began the research that would lead to this book when he got tired of being taken advantage of. He’s not unintelligent, yet he would find himself talked into buying things he didn’t want at all. What was happening? It turns out that there are some basic ways that humans are influenced, and most people follow them without questioning. Some are just the easy way to deal with situations, while some actually create discomfort when one refuses to follow the social conventions. Cialdini breaks it all down into six methods of getting people to do things the way the user wants them to: reciprocation- if someone does something for you, no matter how small, you must then do what they want you to do, hence all those charities that send you return address labels; commitment and consistency-if they can get you to establish yourself as something, say, someone who likes to go out to dinner by asking you about your habits in a survey, then ask you to buy a coupon book for dining out, you are more apt to buy the thing rather than risk the image built in the survey; social proof- if other people think a certain way, so should you- the canned laughter on sitcoms is the most common use of this; liking- this comes into play in ploys like Tupperware parties, where because the person benefiting is your friend you feel you *have* to buy something, it is brought into play by having the seller be someone attractive and dress like and have similar values to you; authority- 9 out of 10 doctors recommend this drug!; and scarcity- hurry, only 10 left! -or limited edition items. We’ve all seen these ploys; we’ve all fallen prey to them. The author gives a few suggestions as to how to prevent yourself from doing so in the future. Basically it comes down to being willing to break social rules, like the one of reciprocity. One must remember to think about every interaction where someone wants something from you, rather than running on auto pilot. It’s an interesting book. Not only does Cialdini have a lot of studies to back up his thesis, but he’s an entertaining writer.more
A good review of literature in easy to read format. A must for sales and marketing folks looking to dig deeper. However most of the research comes from college students in the USA so it may be more narrow than indicated. Great way to be on the lookout for manipulation as well.more
Been wanting to read something by Cialdini for a while, actually ever since I listened to one of his lectures - which was great. A day after I finished it, someone stopped us in the street selling timeshare. The commitment-consistency; contrast & reciprocity techniques were all there in the pitch (...and we didn't buy) [Sep-07:]more
I learned a lot from this book. I wasn't in the mood to read this book at this time but glad that I did. It sure opened my eyes. Those sales men sure know how to presuade us to do things we might not have normally done. Now that I know their secrets I am going to show them. I am not just a pretty blonde anymore. tee hee.more
Required reading for all marketing professionals. The book details the most common approaches to influencing the decisions of others, backed up by the authors time spent infiltrating direct marketing companies and the like. Offers handy hints on how to spot when you're being manipulated and how to handle it.A very enjoyable read, should leave you much more aware of how you're being played next time you're in the market for a used car.more
Load more
scribd