Reader reviews for Stardust

Very different from the movie. I enjoyed reading this book and like the character development. It does not skimp on the fantasy and lightheartedness of a children's novel, but does delve into some darker elements that make it more interesting to older readers.
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Very different from the movie. I enjoyed reading this book and like the character development. It does not skimp on the fantasy and lightheartedness of a children's novel, but does delve into some darker elements that make it more interesting to older readers.
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have watch the movie its a great book
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I listened to this as the audiobook and thoroughly enjoyed this adult fairy tale. Well done, and well read.
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By the 5th chapter the main man was rounding 2nd base, with no signs of slowing... I turned it off right there. I like a little romance in my books as much as the next but that is not what I consider romance. I turned it off before he could get any father. Fondling the breast of some fairy chick he had only spoken to once before? Not cool, more like objectification to me.
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This and "The Princess Bride" are my favorite fairy tale themed books. Both books are a humorous, satirical take on "fairy tale" adventures. "Stardust," however, is more adult than "The Princess Bride." I liked it's raw sense of humor. The characters all had unique and interesting voices. And the story was entertaining (I especially loved the family fued over who will rule the kingdom beyond Wall). The story is magical and enchanting. I also liked the subtle theme of woman empowerment (which was lacking in "The Princess Bride" but was seen in Peter Beagle's "The Last Unicorn").
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Listen to this book! Don't read it! All the things I've said before about loving to hear authors read their works are doubly reinforced here. Neil says the same thing in the interview after the reading. I suppose he read my reviews because he says he loved hearing Stephen King too.In the interview he also mentions the various incarnations of Stardust. I'll probably read the book and the illustrated version and watch the movie. So read the book if you want but do yourself a favor and listen to it too.
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This was a wonderful read ... it gives off a different vibe from the movie though, so be prepared.
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Anyone who loves to revisit that childhood mystical innocence will appreciate Stardust. For some reason I thought of Ray Bradbury (Dandelion Wine) and I'm not sure but the tempo of the work reminded me of it in the beginning.It is a fast read for the most part and really enjoyable. Very Neil Gaiman.
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A day’s drive from London is the small village of Wall, named for a long stone wall that runs through a field near the town. There is only one break in this wall, and it is guarded night and day. The wall, you see, divides the fields we know from the world of Faerie. Only once every nine years is the guard let down, so that the inhabitants of Wall may mingle with the Faerie-folk at their market fair. Tristan Thorne, an inhabitant of Wall, was conceived at this fair, though he doesn’t know it. Now, as a young man, he has the bad luck to fall in love with spoiled beauty Victoria Forester and rashly promises her that he’ll bring her a star that’s fallen on the far side of the wall. In this enchanting modern fairy tale (now a major motion picture!), Tristan sets out to find the star, only to discover that the fallen star he seeks is a living, breathing, and rather cranky young woman named Yvaine. He also discovers that he is not the only one searching for the star. The corrupt sons of the Lord of Stormhold seek her in order to determine which will succeed to their father’s throne, and three evil and ancient witch queens seek her as well, for eating a star’s heart will grant them youth and beauty. Tristan and Yvaine must face these and other fantastical dangers on their way back to Wall and the woman Tristan thinks he loves. Lyrical and deceptively simple, this richly nuanced tale proves that there is more to fairy tales than happily ever after.
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