This title is not available in our membership service

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible.

Request Title

A fiercely ambitious TV talk show host finds she must choose between national stardom in New York and a husband and child in San Francisco. Caught in the middle is their longtime friend, a gay man whose own future is even more uncertain. Wistful and compassionate, yet subversively funny, Sure of You could only come from Armistead Maupin.

Topics: California

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061843044
List price: $8.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Sure of You
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
I'm almost sure that my reading of this one suffered for the fact that I hadn't read the earlier works, but still, in the first half of the book, I'm not sure how reading the rest of the series would have changed my reactions all that much--simply, I was bored, and couldn't bring myself to care about the characters. Their superficiality and inconsiderateness might have been meant to come across as humorous...but for me, they were just annoying and thoughtless. Having read the earlier books, I might have been better able to quickly catch onto the backstories...but the more I learned, the less I wanted to know. All that said, the second half of the book moved much more quickly--and, strangely enough, as the characters moved apart, I had a bit more patience for them. In the end, though, I can't say that the book really ever pulled me in to a space where I wanted to go on or wanted more from Maupin in the future. Chances are, I won't be searching out more of his work, but I certainly won't be searching out more of the series.more
Fantastic, but goddamn it Mary Ann is a bitch. We'll see how I feel about her after I read the new book...more
Definite sense of an ending: the family at 28 Barbary Lane is breaking up, the seventies are a distant memory, and Mary Ann is turning into even more of a monster than she was in Babycakes. Maupin is evidently in a hurry to get rid of the whole bunch of them and start writing something else again. All the same, this is a good, solid novel that stands up by itself, not just a winding-up session for the series.The Greek interlude is quite amusing (and it's nice to have Mona back for a few pages); presumably Maupin didn't know when he put in the bit about Mrs Madrigal going to see the birthplace of Michael Dukakis's father that she would be played in the TV adaptation of the first three books by Dukakis's cousin?more
Maupin’s Tales of the City series (this is No.6) set in San Francisco is easy to read, gently amusing, lightweight, often sentimental and saccharine. Probably a big influence on TV shows like Friends and Sex In The City. More recently, Alexander McCall Smith has successfully emulated Maupin's achievement of writing his novels in the 44 Scotland Street series as daily newspaper instalments (in The Scotsman).more
Maupin's delightful and fascinating characters find their way through San Francisco in the late 70s. AIDS and social awareness has crept into the lives of the inhabitants of Barbary Lane. The party is winding down. People are growing up.more
Read all 9 reviews

Reviews

I'm almost sure that my reading of this one suffered for the fact that I hadn't read the earlier works, but still, in the first half of the book, I'm not sure how reading the rest of the series would have changed my reactions all that much--simply, I was bored, and couldn't bring myself to care about the characters. Their superficiality and inconsiderateness might have been meant to come across as humorous...but for me, they were just annoying and thoughtless. Having read the earlier books, I might have been better able to quickly catch onto the backstories...but the more I learned, the less I wanted to know. All that said, the second half of the book moved much more quickly--and, strangely enough, as the characters moved apart, I had a bit more patience for them. In the end, though, I can't say that the book really ever pulled me in to a space where I wanted to go on or wanted more from Maupin in the future. Chances are, I won't be searching out more of his work, but I certainly won't be searching out more of the series.more
Fantastic, but goddamn it Mary Ann is a bitch. We'll see how I feel about her after I read the new book...more
Definite sense of an ending: the family at 28 Barbary Lane is breaking up, the seventies are a distant memory, and Mary Ann is turning into even more of a monster than she was in Babycakes. Maupin is evidently in a hurry to get rid of the whole bunch of them and start writing something else again. All the same, this is a good, solid novel that stands up by itself, not just a winding-up session for the series.The Greek interlude is quite amusing (and it's nice to have Mona back for a few pages); presumably Maupin didn't know when he put in the bit about Mrs Madrigal going to see the birthplace of Michael Dukakis's father that she would be played in the TV adaptation of the first three books by Dukakis's cousin?more
Maupin’s Tales of the City series (this is No.6) set in San Francisco is easy to read, gently amusing, lightweight, often sentimental and saccharine. Probably a big influence on TV shows like Friends and Sex In The City. More recently, Alexander McCall Smith has successfully emulated Maupin's achievement of writing his novels in the 44 Scotland Street series as daily newspaper instalments (in The Scotsman).more
Maupin's delightful and fascinating characters find their way through San Francisco in the late 70s. AIDS and social awareness has crept into the lives of the inhabitants of Barbary Lane. The party is winding down. People are growing up.more
scribd