The Case of the Missing Lady
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Summary

When a six-foot-tall tan giant of man comes into Albert Blunt’s International Detective agency, Tommy and Tuppence—married couple and detective aficionados—are in for a treat. Not only has Mr. Stavansson emerged after a two-year Arctic adventure, but he’s lost his fiancée Hermione too. What telegrams and scraps of information Tommy and Tuppence can gather are all the hope the adventurer has in finding her. But this information leads the duo into dangerous situations, investigating secluded country houses in the dead of night, and that’s only the start of it….

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062129741
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The Case of the Missing Lady

A Tommy & Tuppence Short Story

by Agatha Christie

Contents

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Title Page

The Case of the Missing Lady

About the Author

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The Case of the Missing Lady

‘The Case of the Missing Lady’ was first published in The Sketch, 15 October 1924. Sherlock Holmes was created by

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930).

The buzzer on Mr Blunt’s desk – International Detective Agency, Manager, Theodore Blunt – uttered its warning call. Tommy and Tuppence both flew to their respective peepholes which commanded a view of the outer office. There it was Albert’s business to delay the prospective client with various artistic devices.

‘I will see, sir,’ he was saying. ‘But I’m afraid Mr Blunt is very busy just at present. He is engaged with Scotland Yard on the phone just now.’

‘I’ll wait,’ said the visitor. ‘I haven’t got a card with me, but my name is Gabriel Stavansson.’

The client was a magnificent specimen of manhood, standing over six foot high. His face was bronzed and weatherbeaten, and the extraordinary blue of his eyes made an almost startling contrast to the brown skin.

Tommy swiftly made up his mind. He put on his hat, picked up some gloves and opened the door. He paused on the threshold.

‘This gentleman is waiting to see you, Mr Blunt,’ said