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Jeff Winston, forty-three, didn't know he was a replayer until he died and woke up twenty-five years younger in his college dorm room; he lived another life. And died again. And lived again and died again -- in a continuous twenty-five-year cycle -- each time starting from scratch at the age of eighteen to reclaim lost loves, remedy past mistakes, or make a fortune in the stock market. A novel of gripping adventure, romance, and fascinating speculation on the nature of time, Replay asks the question: "What if you could live your life over again?"

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062030696
List price: $9.99
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Can't get enough of this book - one of my all time, hands-down favorites. Oh, it's a little sappy and wanders here and there, okay, fine but I tell you, there's something about it. more
Leo is the middle child in a large family. He often feels invisible among his loud siblings and relatives. Leo is also a dreamer, who uses his imagination to picture how he would like the world to be. This book is about Leo growing up and learning about family history, and thinking about what he would like to become in the future.This book had a lot of elements that I should have loved (the school play, the family dynamics, the imaginative main character) . . . but I didn't love it. It was all right, but not fantastic. All in all, a book that I don't mind having read once, but not one that I would want to read again.more
Creech has done it again! Deftly mixing family life, growing-up issues and humor she weaves the tale of Leo "fog boy" or "Sardin-o" to his family as he balances feeling unseen in his big, boisterous Italian family and finding his voice onstage in the school play. Another great story from a master storyteller for children.more
Although Leo often feels overshadowed by his siblings, he knows he was meant for something big. His class play seems like the perfect opportunity to shine, until he is given the minimal part of the old crone. Meanwhile, Leo finds his father’s journal from when he was thirteen and struggles to reconcile the short-tempered father he knows and the fun loving boy of the journal. This is the story of a boy’s attempt to find his role in his family, the play, and in life. Sharon Creech’s book covers a wide range of emotions effectively. Its ending is uplifting, but also realistic, leaving some problems unsolved. Written in the present tense with special attention to actions, Replay almost reads like a play. It even starts with a list of scenes and a description of the cast of characters. Although it frequently jumps from the present into Leo’s memories and dreams, it is always easy to follow. Replay is a unique book for children in fourth through eighth grade. This book is highly recommended for the children’s section of public libraries and elementary school libraries.more
Personal Response:While, I did not think this was the greatest book ever, it still had a lot of good points. It was somewhat reminiscent to Creech's "Walk two Moons" in the way that Leo tries to figure out his father is similar to how Sal in "Walk two Moons" tries to learn more about her mother. I liked how this book didn't sugarcoat some of the issues that families often face. I think a lot of kids could fine something to relate to in this book. Library/Classroom Uses:This book has a lot of over-the-top dramatic characters in it, and would work well for a read-aloud.If I were a classroom teacher, I think this would be a fun book to read to my students right before beginning to work on performing a play. This book includes the script for play Leo was in, so the class could even act the same play out.The play in this book would be a fun one for a group of students to act out or do a puppet show of at a public library.more
Grade: 4-6Genre: Realistic FictionThemes: Family life, Father and son, deathIn this book, Leo lives with his 3 siblings and father and mother. Leo feels he gets lost in the bunch. Much of this book happens in Leo's mind as he replays scenes from his normal day and becomes the hero in his mind. He has a small part in a play and wonders if his dad will be as proud of him as he is of his brother, Pietro, the football player or his sister, Conttento, the soccer player. This book is filled with reading and writing strategies that kids understand because it is filled with humor. I would use this book as a read aloud and focus on writing strategies such as repetition, descriptive writing, writing from a different perspective, writing a play. The actual play is in the back of the story and I would also have students do this as a reader's theatre. There are so many teaching possibilities in this book.more
This would have a been good school play!more
Read all 12 reviews

Reviews

Can't get enough of this book - one of my all time, hands-down favorites. Oh, it's a little sappy and wanders here and there, okay, fine but I tell you, there's something about it. more
Leo is the middle child in a large family. He often feels invisible among his loud siblings and relatives. Leo is also a dreamer, who uses his imagination to picture how he would like the world to be. This book is about Leo growing up and learning about family history, and thinking about what he would like to become in the future.This book had a lot of elements that I should have loved (the school play, the family dynamics, the imaginative main character) . . . but I didn't love it. It was all right, but not fantastic. All in all, a book that I don't mind having read once, but not one that I would want to read again.more
Creech has done it again! Deftly mixing family life, growing-up issues and humor she weaves the tale of Leo "fog boy" or "Sardin-o" to his family as he balances feeling unseen in his big, boisterous Italian family and finding his voice onstage in the school play. Another great story from a master storyteller for children.more
Although Leo often feels overshadowed by his siblings, he knows he was meant for something big. His class play seems like the perfect opportunity to shine, until he is given the minimal part of the old crone. Meanwhile, Leo finds his father’s journal from when he was thirteen and struggles to reconcile the short-tempered father he knows and the fun loving boy of the journal. This is the story of a boy’s attempt to find his role in his family, the play, and in life. Sharon Creech’s book covers a wide range of emotions effectively. Its ending is uplifting, but also realistic, leaving some problems unsolved. Written in the present tense with special attention to actions, Replay almost reads like a play. It even starts with a list of scenes and a description of the cast of characters. Although it frequently jumps from the present into Leo’s memories and dreams, it is always easy to follow. Replay is a unique book for children in fourth through eighth grade. This book is highly recommended for the children’s section of public libraries and elementary school libraries.more
Personal Response:While, I did not think this was the greatest book ever, it still had a lot of good points. It was somewhat reminiscent to Creech's "Walk two Moons" in the way that Leo tries to figure out his father is similar to how Sal in "Walk two Moons" tries to learn more about her mother. I liked how this book didn't sugarcoat some of the issues that families often face. I think a lot of kids could fine something to relate to in this book. Library/Classroom Uses:This book has a lot of over-the-top dramatic characters in it, and would work well for a read-aloud.If I were a classroom teacher, I think this would be a fun book to read to my students right before beginning to work on performing a play. This book includes the script for play Leo was in, so the class could even act the same play out.The play in this book would be a fun one for a group of students to act out or do a puppet show of at a public library.more
Grade: 4-6Genre: Realistic FictionThemes: Family life, Father and son, deathIn this book, Leo lives with his 3 siblings and father and mother. Leo feels he gets lost in the bunch. Much of this book happens in Leo's mind as he replays scenes from his normal day and becomes the hero in his mind. He has a small part in a play and wonders if his dad will be as proud of him as he is of his brother, Pietro, the football player or his sister, Conttento, the soccer player. This book is filled with reading and writing strategies that kids understand because it is filled with humor. I would use this book as a read aloud and focus on writing strategies such as repetition, descriptive writing, writing from a different perspective, writing a play. The actual play is in the back of the story and I would also have students do this as a reader's theatre. There are so many teaching possibilities in this book.more
This would have a been good school play!more
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