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Bestselling author Bernard Cornwell takes us back four thousand years, to a vibrant world of ritual and sacrifice that is at once timeless and wholly original. This historical novel unlocks the mystery of Britain's most haunting and puzzling structure, and tells a tale of three brothers—fierce rivals—who are uneasily united in their quest to create a temple to their gods. Lengar, the eldest brother, kills his own father to become chief of his tribe. Camaban, the illegitimate middle brother, is determined to have a massive temple built in his own honor. And Saban, the youngest, who actually builds Stonehenge, must act as mediator between the other two. Stonehenge is the enthrallingly dramatic story of patricide, betrayal, and murder; of bloody brotherly rivalry; and of the never-ending quest for power, wealth, and spiritual fulfillment.

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061841002
List price: $10.99
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I'm a huge Cornwell fan, but this book is pretty bad. It's hard to keep track of which charicter is which, and is just not written like his other books. Stick to the Sharp books.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An entertaining read, that kept me interested right to the end.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I didn't think I was going to like it after the first few pages. But it got better and about half way through, I couldn't put it down.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I found this to be a fascinating story about the building of Stonehenge. The story takes place in 2000BC when men believed that gods and goddesses ruled over everything in the world and that the two most powerful were the Sun and the Moon. Three brothers lives were wrapped up in the building of this great temple. The oldest was the fierce warrior who left the village only to come back and kill his own father and took over the leadership of the his people. The middle son was born with a twisted leg and was going to be sacrificed to the gods. His own intellect saved him from being sacrificed when he presented himself as a great preist and told everyone he was favored by the gods. Stonehenge was his life's passion - he thought it would change the world. The youngest son, the most diplomatic and kind, was first sold into slavery by his oldest brother then saved by his middle brother in order to build the temple. The story ranges the lifetime of these three men and describes the culture of the time in great detail. It was a most interesting read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In my opinion one of Cornwell's best efforts yet. Trully excellent characterisation and, arguably unusually a well developed major female character, possibly following on from Nimue in the Warolrd Chronicles. It is a quite plausible narrative of the origins of Stonehenge and a highly probable characterisation of life in ancient Britain. Any fan of the Warlord Chronicles series should love this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The novel Stonehenge 2000BC by Bernard Cornwell is an illuminating novel addressing what events brought about the inspiration and building of Stonehenge. The story is based on historical information gathered from archaeological digs and sociological information gleaned from many researchers about that period in time. The protagonist of the story, twelve year old Saban (his name meaning favored one), is followed through his development to manhood and finally, as the chief of his tribal home, Ratharryn. His story aligns closely to the people's changing ideas towards their gods and their ever-changing loyalties. There are several sub plots in the novel outlining the political and social unrest between the villages that are near, as well as villages from afar. Although all the villages have similar lifestyles and worship patterns, they all prioritize different gods, leading to social unrest, human sacrifice and war. Bernard Cornwell does an outstanding job of developing each character and building suspense throughout the novel. I had a difficult time putting the book down as I was anxious to see what would happen next. I highly recommend this book. It is very interesting and thought-provoking.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Two-dimensional characters struggle for power and survival against a bronze age background that is only marginally believable. The author did research (based on the historical note) but little of it came through in this fictionalization of the creation of Stonehenge.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
a real page turner; the ways of camaban remind me of bernard cornwells merlin or nimue in respect of the old druidic way of distorting their own gods will to their own will; just as enchanting as "the animal wife" by a different author.bernard seems to have an afinity with those in power within the old ways and his understanding of british history almost makes me forget this is fiction.the first time i read this book i flew through it with barely a pause; this time round i'm reading it at a more leisurely pace and it still captivates me.let's thank the gods for second hand book shops :)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Stonehenge: A Novel is a stand-alone adventure from the fascinating and ever surprising mind of Cornwell about the creation of Stonehenge. Cornwell realistically captures, imo, the time and travails of the various people who created Stonehenge. A remarkable read, although not quite chock full of the blood and guts as his usual stories are, but nevertheless engrossing. Not for those who believe only a peaceful matriarchic fantasy filled society created the stones.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've always been fascinated and intrigued by Stonehenge and in this book Cornwell takes us back in time. We are introduced to the landscape, the settlements, the people and their beliefs in such a realistic fashion I almost forgot that this was fiction! Of course, Cornwell has conducted extensive research and this is a spectacular work of fiction for any reader who has ever wondered about the meaning of Stonehenge or its construction. The people worship many Gods, including the God of the Sun and the Moon, and sacrifice is part of their everyday life. The reader also learns a little about the customs of the people and the cultures of those in faraway settlements.I thoroughly enjoyed reading about how and why Stonehenge was constructed (according to Cornwell) and marveled at the human effort required. I also have a better understanding of what the stones represent having finished this work.I thoroughly recommended this book for anyone who enjoys historical fiction or who has ever wondered about Stonehenge.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A stranger appears one day at an old unused temple near Ratharryn. He is not a member of any of the local tribes. He is also injured, and with a little help from the two who found him, soon dies from his wounds. This stranger carried gold with him and it is this gold that will bring forth a feud that will tear brothers apart, inspire religions, and cause war among the local tribes.Brothers Lengar, Saban, and Camaban have little in common. Lengar is strong, defiant, and always willing to fight; Saban is the peacemaker and builder; and Camaban is unacknowledged by his father and cast out of the tribe because of a deformed foot. Lengar uses fear and brutality to eventually take over the tribe, overthrowing his father and virtually enslaving his own people. He casts Saban out but is unaware of a plan by Camaban to keep him safe until he can return to rule the tribe. In the end, it is Camaban who cleverly uses religion and sorcery to inspire the building of Stonehenge and bring about the near destruction of his people. Saban, who unwillingly shares his brother's vision for the temple, is the one that is able to finally bring it to fruition and peace to his people.As with most Cornwell novels I have read, there is usually a long list of characters and this one is no exception. There are several tribes, sorcerers, gods, and places to keep track of in this book. He manages to blend the stories of the different people well and it feels cohesive even when several events are taking place at the same time.I put this book down at one point and wasn't sure if I would go back to it. Eventually I did and once a certain character was out of the picture, I found I liked the book much more and found the remainder quite interesting. The building of the temple was fascinating --- the way the stones were moved, fashioned, and positioned was a story unto itself. The religious aspect and invoking of several gods was also intriguing. The superstitions and rituals were so ingrained in the characters that it felt very natural for some of the events to take place even if they were barbaric and not something one would consider necessary for religion.I didn't like this book as much as other Cornwell books I have read but found it rather interesting in terms of the religious aspects portrayed here and how the societies were torn apart by gold and gods. Cornwell's imagining of the building of Stonehenge is engrossing and made me want to find out more about it in the end.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Stonehenge is a pretty interesting book, in terms of surmises about how the henge was built and the reasons for various things being there and so on. Unfortunately, as a novel it didn't work for me. The writing style, for a start, is very simplistic. I've read and enjoyed Bernard Cornwell's writing before -- namely the Warlord Chronicles -- which unfortunately made me notice that characters are very much recycled. It's easy to see some of Ceinwyn in Aurenna, and a bit of Nimue in both Aurenna and Derrewyn. Saban isn't quite Derfel, but it's close, and I can see a bit of Arthur in him too. Camaban is Merlin, and Camaban's goals are just about the same as Merlin. Aurenna's betrayal is the same as Guinevere's, and not even as interesting and heart-wrenching.

Easy to read, reasonable to curl up with and just relax, but it doesn't have the same life in my head as the Warlord Chronicles, and I'm not keeping it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really like historical fiction especially those that follow one person through their life and trials. This is great conjecture on why and how Stonehenge was built-the tribes and gods that were involvedread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Action packed with excellent characterizations, the book races through the lives of a father (Hengall) chief of the Rathharryn tribe, and his three sons who each in turn also becomes chief of the tribe. The peace of the tribe is shattered by a fugitive from the coastal region of Wales, who steals his tribes ceremonial gold and is killed by Lengar, the oldest son when he comes into Rathharryn territory. There is much fighting and death in the book. The people are bound by fear and superstition, brutality and sickness abound. There is war between Rathharryn and the neighbouring tribe Cathallo.For a modern novel, the role and position women receive is a shock. No doubt it is more credible than the soapy stories of the Earth Stories of Jean Auel for what life had in store for women – and is far more insightful of the male psyche.Loved the book, had trouble putting it down. True to his style the violence and fighting is very graphic, but sex is an allusion only. The pagans of old England lived “short brutish lives”.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A fairly enjoyable romp through Mr Cornwell's vision of a possible building of Sronehenge, with sorcery and violence, sacrifice and blood, slavery and whelping. In my view it would have benefited from less B-movie-esque females and some rather more bronze age dialogue sans modern English sensitivities. The historical note at the end is welcomed.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I am not a fan of prehistoric fiction, but I am a fan of Bernard Cornwell. Having recently finished the Sharpe series, and the Grail series I was ready for a stand alone novel and picked up Stonehenge. The story takes place over a period of about 20 years and focuses on the three sons of Hengall, particularly upon Saban the youngest son. From the beginning of the story, Saban is a man of integrity; in some ways he reminds me of Thomas of Hookton in the Grail Series. I really like both Saban and Thomas of Hookton, because they each are decent men who get caught up in great events and faithfully carry an unwelcome burden with wisdom and intelligence.The great event in Stonehenge is, of course, how the Stonehenge might have come to be built. The maelstrom of events created by people as they strive to follow dieties, get caught up in power struggles and madness, and endure the difficulties involved in the creation, engineering, and building of the Stonehenge are intriguing, and seem highly plausible. As usual, I appreciated the explanatory Historical Note at the end.I did not find this novel to be a page turner. As I have come to expect of Cornwell, the characterizations and plot were tight, but this was a slower-paced read than the other stories I have read by this author. I recommend it to fans of Bernard Cornwell, and of Neolithic fiction.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

I'm a huge Cornwell fan, but this book is pretty bad. It's hard to keep track of which charicter is which, and is just not written like his other books. Stick to the Sharp books.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An entertaining read, that kept me interested right to the end.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I didn't think I was going to like it after the first few pages. But it got better and about half way through, I couldn't put it down.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I found this to be a fascinating story about the building of Stonehenge. The story takes place in 2000BC when men believed that gods and goddesses ruled over everything in the world and that the two most powerful were the Sun and the Moon. Three brothers lives were wrapped up in the building of this great temple. The oldest was the fierce warrior who left the village only to come back and kill his own father and took over the leadership of the his people. The middle son was born with a twisted leg and was going to be sacrificed to the gods. His own intellect saved him from being sacrificed when he presented himself as a great preist and told everyone he was favored by the gods. Stonehenge was his life's passion - he thought it would change the world. The youngest son, the most diplomatic and kind, was first sold into slavery by his oldest brother then saved by his middle brother in order to build the temple. The story ranges the lifetime of these three men and describes the culture of the time in great detail. It was a most interesting read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In my opinion one of Cornwell's best efforts yet. Trully excellent characterisation and, arguably unusually a well developed major female character, possibly following on from Nimue in the Warolrd Chronicles. It is a quite plausible narrative of the origins of Stonehenge and a highly probable characterisation of life in ancient Britain. Any fan of the Warlord Chronicles series should love this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The novel Stonehenge 2000BC by Bernard Cornwell is an illuminating novel addressing what events brought about the inspiration and building of Stonehenge. The story is based on historical information gathered from archaeological digs and sociological information gleaned from many researchers about that period in time. The protagonist of the story, twelve year old Saban (his name meaning favored one), is followed through his development to manhood and finally, as the chief of his tribal home, Ratharryn. His story aligns closely to the people's changing ideas towards their gods and their ever-changing loyalties. There are several sub plots in the novel outlining the political and social unrest between the villages that are near, as well as villages from afar. Although all the villages have similar lifestyles and worship patterns, they all prioritize different gods, leading to social unrest, human sacrifice and war. Bernard Cornwell does an outstanding job of developing each character and building suspense throughout the novel. I had a difficult time putting the book down as I was anxious to see what would happen next. I highly recommend this book. It is very interesting and thought-provoking.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Two-dimensional characters struggle for power and survival against a bronze age background that is only marginally believable. The author did research (based on the historical note) but little of it came through in this fictionalization of the creation of Stonehenge.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
a real page turner; the ways of camaban remind me of bernard cornwells merlin or nimue in respect of the old druidic way of distorting their own gods will to their own will; just as enchanting as "the animal wife" by a different author.bernard seems to have an afinity with those in power within the old ways and his understanding of british history almost makes me forget this is fiction.the first time i read this book i flew through it with barely a pause; this time round i'm reading it at a more leisurely pace and it still captivates me.let's thank the gods for second hand book shops :)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Stonehenge: A Novel is a stand-alone adventure from the fascinating and ever surprising mind of Cornwell about the creation of Stonehenge. Cornwell realistically captures, imo, the time and travails of the various people who created Stonehenge. A remarkable read, although not quite chock full of the blood and guts as his usual stories are, but nevertheless engrossing. Not for those who believe only a peaceful matriarchic fantasy filled society created the stones.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've always been fascinated and intrigued by Stonehenge and in this book Cornwell takes us back in time. We are introduced to the landscape, the settlements, the people and their beliefs in such a realistic fashion I almost forgot that this was fiction! Of course, Cornwell has conducted extensive research and this is a spectacular work of fiction for any reader who has ever wondered about the meaning of Stonehenge or its construction. The people worship many Gods, including the God of the Sun and the Moon, and sacrifice is part of their everyday life. The reader also learns a little about the customs of the people and the cultures of those in faraway settlements.I thoroughly enjoyed reading about how and why Stonehenge was constructed (according to Cornwell) and marveled at the human effort required. I also have a better understanding of what the stones represent having finished this work.I thoroughly recommended this book for anyone who enjoys historical fiction or who has ever wondered about Stonehenge.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A stranger appears one day at an old unused temple near Ratharryn. He is not a member of any of the local tribes. He is also injured, and with a little help from the two who found him, soon dies from his wounds. This stranger carried gold with him and it is this gold that will bring forth a feud that will tear brothers apart, inspire religions, and cause war among the local tribes.Brothers Lengar, Saban, and Camaban have little in common. Lengar is strong, defiant, and always willing to fight; Saban is the peacemaker and builder; and Camaban is unacknowledged by his father and cast out of the tribe because of a deformed foot. Lengar uses fear and brutality to eventually take over the tribe, overthrowing his father and virtually enslaving his own people. He casts Saban out but is unaware of a plan by Camaban to keep him safe until he can return to rule the tribe. In the end, it is Camaban who cleverly uses religion and sorcery to inspire the building of Stonehenge and bring about the near destruction of his people. Saban, who unwillingly shares his brother's vision for the temple, is the one that is able to finally bring it to fruition and peace to his people.As with most Cornwell novels I have read, there is usually a long list of characters and this one is no exception. There are several tribes, sorcerers, gods, and places to keep track of in this book. He manages to blend the stories of the different people well and it feels cohesive even when several events are taking place at the same time.I put this book down at one point and wasn't sure if I would go back to it. Eventually I did and once a certain character was out of the picture, I found I liked the book much more and found the remainder quite interesting. The building of the temple was fascinating --- the way the stones were moved, fashioned, and positioned was a story unto itself. The religious aspect and invoking of several gods was also intriguing. The superstitions and rituals were so ingrained in the characters that it felt very natural for some of the events to take place even if they were barbaric and not something one would consider necessary for religion.I didn't like this book as much as other Cornwell books I have read but found it rather interesting in terms of the religious aspects portrayed here and how the societies were torn apart by gold and gods. Cornwell's imagining of the building of Stonehenge is engrossing and made me want to find out more about it in the end.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Stonehenge is a pretty interesting book, in terms of surmises about how the henge was built and the reasons for various things being there and so on. Unfortunately, as a novel it didn't work for me. The writing style, for a start, is very simplistic. I've read and enjoyed Bernard Cornwell's writing before -- namely the Warlord Chronicles -- which unfortunately made me notice that characters are very much recycled. It's easy to see some of Ceinwyn in Aurenna, and a bit of Nimue in both Aurenna and Derrewyn. Saban isn't quite Derfel, but it's close, and I can see a bit of Arthur in him too. Camaban is Merlin, and Camaban's goals are just about the same as Merlin. Aurenna's betrayal is the same as Guinevere's, and not even as interesting and heart-wrenching.

Easy to read, reasonable to curl up with and just relax, but it doesn't have the same life in my head as the Warlord Chronicles, and I'm not keeping it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I really like historical fiction especially those that follow one person through their life and trials. This is great conjecture on why and how Stonehenge was built-the tribes and gods that were involved
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Action packed with excellent characterizations, the book races through the lives of a father (Hengall) chief of the Rathharryn tribe, and his three sons who each in turn also becomes chief of the tribe. The peace of the tribe is shattered by a fugitive from the coastal region of Wales, who steals his tribes ceremonial gold and is killed by Lengar, the oldest son when he comes into Rathharryn territory. There is much fighting and death in the book. The people are bound by fear and superstition, brutality and sickness abound. There is war between Rathharryn and the neighbouring tribe Cathallo.For a modern novel, the role and position women receive is a shock. No doubt it is more credible than the soapy stories of the Earth Stories of Jean Auel for what life had in store for women – and is far more insightful of the male psyche.Loved the book, had trouble putting it down. True to his style the violence and fighting is very graphic, but sex is an allusion only. The pagans of old England lived “short brutish lives”.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A fairly enjoyable romp through Mr Cornwell's vision of a possible building of Sronehenge, with sorcery and violence, sacrifice and blood, slavery and whelping. In my view it would have benefited from less B-movie-esque females and some rather more bronze age dialogue sans modern English sensitivities. The historical note at the end is welcomed.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I am not a fan of prehistoric fiction, but I am a fan of Bernard Cornwell. Having recently finished the Sharpe series, and the Grail series I was ready for a stand alone novel and picked up Stonehenge. The story takes place over a period of about 20 years and focuses on the three sons of Hengall, particularly upon Saban the youngest son. From the beginning of the story, Saban is a man of integrity; in some ways he reminds me of Thomas of Hookton in the Grail Series. I really like both Saban and Thomas of Hookton, because they each are decent men who get caught up in great events and faithfully carry an unwelcome burden with wisdom and intelligence.The great event in Stonehenge is, of course, how the Stonehenge might have come to be built. The maelstrom of events created by people as they strive to follow dieties, get caught up in power struggles and madness, and endure the difficulties involved in the creation, engineering, and building of the Stonehenge are intriguing, and seem highly plausible. As usual, I appreciated the explanatory Historical Note at the end.I did not find this novel to be a page turner. As I have come to expect of Cornwell, the characterizations and plot were tight, but this was a slower-paced read than the other stories I have read by this author. I recommend it to fans of Bernard Cornwell, and of Neolithic fiction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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